Thumb sm
Brazilian Families Affected by Zika i...
Recife
By Flavio Forner
26 Jan 2016

Photos of Brazilian families affected by the outbreak of the Zika virus in the city of Recife, in northeast Brazil, as mothers seek help for their babies born with microcephaly.

The Brazilian army is deployed on the streets of Recife in a door-to-door campaign in search of vestiges of Aedes mosquito larvae, responsible for spreading the Zika virus. The population receives instructions on how best to protect and prevent the emergence of mosquitoes in their homes.

The Zika virus, first detected about 40 years ago in Uganda, has long been seen as a less-painful cousin to Dengue and Chikunguya, which are spread by the same Aedes mosquito. Brazilian health authorities are convinced that microcephaly is related to the Zika virus when a pregnant woman is bitten by this insect. This rare condition known as microcephaly often results in mental retardation.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 19
Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Mother holds her baby, born with microcephaly, waiting medical attention at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 20
Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Pregnant woman waits for consultation at a clinic in Recife, Brazil.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 17
Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, takes her 4 month-old daughter Alice to a medical consultation by Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden. Alice was born with microcephaly.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 18
Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden measures Alice's skull. The 4 month-old baby was born with microcephaly. Alice's mother is Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 07
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Recife's Health Department workers and soldiers from the Brazilian military work together in detecting mosquito outbreaks.The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 08
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier checking a house in Recife for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes Aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 09
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier and Recife's Health Department worker talk to local resident to check for Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 10
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A biologist works in a laboratory at Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 11
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 12
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 13
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 14
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 15
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Because of the mild symptoms of Zika virus, few people visit a doctor so the government does not know how many Brazilians are already infected. Pernambuco state is the leader with 33 percent probability of microcephaly. The regional government declared a state of emergency in last September.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 16
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 01
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela Rocha, 67, infectologist at the Oswaldo Cruz hospital in Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil).

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 02
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Mothers awaiting care in the waiting room at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 03
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator with her 4 month-old daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 04
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Erika Roque with her son Eric, born with microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, where he receives physical therapy.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 05
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela, infectious disease specialist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, shows an image of the skull of a child with microcephaly.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 06
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Rafael, an official from Recife's Health Department at a meeting on actions to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, insect that spreads the Zika virus.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 21
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his daughter Alice, one of many Brazilian babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 22
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Jonathan Gomes Bezerra, a 14 year-old student, holds his sister Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 23
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator baths her daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 24
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, worker at Recife airport, and Nadja Gomes bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, with their daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 25
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his crying daughter Alice. She is one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children in Bulgaria
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
29 Sep 2014

Bulgaria is one of the countries in the world most affected by the abandonment of children. Every year, 2,000 babies are placed in state institutions, while over 7,000 infants and teenagers live without parents. This practice of abandoning children is a by-product of the family policy in the countries that were part of the Soviet Union. In these countries, the state or "homeland" acted as the surrogate mother for abandoned children and took care of families. As a result, thousands of children in Bulgaria have grown up without proper care and affection. The shocking images of the Rumanian orphanages in the eighties opened the eyes of the authorities and public opinion about these child prisons. In 2009, a BBC report showing wild children in Bulgaria fighting for food and living in terrible conditions greatly upset the population. Over the last few years, NGOs, the European Union, and Unicef have mobilized in an effort to close these orphanages. The state of Bulgaria also decided on a national plan to close the institutions. The authorities made a commitment to provide alternative housing and care for these children, which involves developing a network of host families, facilitating adoption processes, helping the biological families financially to encourage them to keep their children, and creating small institutions to help handicapped children (42 % of the abandoned children suffer from a disability). But what really needs addressing is the causes behind the high level of abandonment. Poverty, lack of access to healthcare (among the Roma minority in particular), poor sexual education, and the high price and inaccessibility of contraceptives are all issues that contribute to the problem. This is a colossal challenge for the poorest country in the European Union, compounded by corruption. Another angle to the story: ‘Mothers in Chains’ After being abandoned, the child has to grow up without a mother. Placed in an institution, they are surrounded by women who will give them care and affection. Nurses, nannies, volunteers and, in the best cases, a family assistant if there is placement in host family or foster mother if they are lucky enough to be adopted. To make up for the absence of the biological mother, surrogate mothers' chain is going to be set up. Who are these women who devote themselves to taking care of these abandoned children? How do they work? What are the aftereffects on the children after having so many different maternal relationships?

Thumb sm
IMG_5425.jpg
Shumen
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A nurse plays with two children in the garden of Shumen Institution, the oldest institution in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 13
Shumen, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 12
Targovishte, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Zlatka Rizaeva, a nurse at the Turghovist Institution, takes care of a young disabled boy in the room where all the seven disabled children sleep at the institution.
As Rizaeva introduces us to the seven children, a girl holds on her two legs. Others spend their days sleeping, coiled in their colored sheets, sometimes unable to move. "It is very hard this work with them," admits Rizaeva. "They need a lot of care. And then, our job is often depreciated. People have difficulty understanding our everyday life here. They do not think of the many positive things this kind of institution offers."

Thumb sm
Children Of Agent Orange (26 of 32)
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
By hiroko tanaka
03 Mar 2013

A child with severe hydrocephalus, or swelling of the brain, caused by a buildup of fluid in the skull is seen in Peace Village ward at Tu Du Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, home for surviving child victims of Agent Orange, the herbicide used by the U.S military during the Vietnam War. According to the United Nations, Agent Orange and its active ingredient dioxin is "one of the most toxic compounds known to humans.". It is claimed that children born to parents exposed to Agent Orange can be stillborn or born with birth defects, including skin disease, mental illness, and deformities. After decades of Vietnam War, effects of Agent Orange still runs silently through generations.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (22 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows twin baby girls recently born, under a malnutrition state.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (35 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows , a baby girl, affected by the guinea worm, in severe conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Guinea worm, is another serious pathology, in remote areas of Uganda.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (44 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows a nurse taking care of a recent twin babies born.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (45 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows orphans of HIV/AIDS victims.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (48 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows a child with his mother, waiting in line, before testing for HIV/AIDS, in Luweero general hospital.

Thumb sm
HEALTH CARE IN UGANDA
Kampala, Uganda
By U.S. Editor
09 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.

Thumb sm
Island of Twins (9 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

Jane and joy are the youngest twins on the island at 5 months old.

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

Thumb sm
Island of Twins (1o of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

The youngest twins found on the island.

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.