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Cyclone Yuva.
Karachi
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
09 Jun 2019

Police Constables on horses alerting public coming on sea view beach for fun because of Cyclone Yuva alerts, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Sea View Beach, Karachi, Pakistan.
The hot weather conditions prevailing in the city of Karachi might lose or increase their intensity depending on whether the system developing in the Arabian Sea turns into a cyclone, Cyclone Vayu is likely to intensify further into a severe cyclonic storm during the next 24 hours, an alert issued by Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD).

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Cyclone Yuva.
Karachi
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
09 Jun 2019

Public enjoying camel ride and watching beautiful clouds formation because of Cyclone Yuva 1100 km away from the sea lines of Karachi, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Sea View Beach, Karachi, Pakistan.
The hot weather conditions prevailing in the city of Karachi might lose or increase their intensity depending on whether the system developing in the Arabian Sea turns into a cyclone, Cyclone Vayu is likely to intensify further into a severe cyclonic storm during the next 24 hours, an alert issued by Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD).

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Cyclone Yuva.
Karachi
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
09 Jun 2019

Police Constable on Horse stopping motorcyclist at sea view beach and alerting them about cyclone Yuva , Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Sea View Beach, Karachi, Pakistan.
The hot weather conditions prevailing in the city of Karachi might lose or increase their intensity depending on whether the system developing in the Arabian Sea turns into a cyclone, Cyclone Vayu is likely to intensify further into a severe cyclonic storm during the next 24 hours, an alert issued by Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD).

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Cyclone Yuva.
Karachi
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
09 Jun 2019

Beautiful clouds formation because of Cyclone Yuva 1100 km away from the coastal area of Karachi, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Sea View Beach, Karachi, Pakistan.
The hot weather conditions prevailing in the city of Karachi might lose or increase their intensity depending on whether the system developing in the Arabian Sea turns into a cyclone, Cyclone Vayu is likely to intensify further into a severe cyclonic storm during the next 24 hours, an alert issued by Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD).

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Electric Skies: Chasing Catatumbo Lig...
Lake Maracaibo
By Transterra Media
08 Jul 2016

Buried deep in the jungles of Venezuela exists one of the world’s most unknown natural phenomenon: Catatumbo Lightning. Every year, Bahamian photographer and Catatumbo Lightning expert Alan Highton guides small groups of storm chasing tourists on a rugged 4-day journey through the precarious Venezuelan backcountry to his jungle guesthouse. Armed with waterproof bags, mosquito nets and other backcountry gear, the group must travel first by plane, then by road, and finally by boat. Once at the guesthouse they wait to witness Catatumbo Lightning first hand.

Catatumbo Lightning is a thundering symphony of relentless lighting storms concentrated in a small area. Occurring 140 to 160 nights a year, 10 hours per day and striking up to 280 times per hour, the storms are unmatched in their ferocity and unrelenting power. The Guinness Book of World Records will be adding Catatumbo Lightning to their list of record holders for the highest amount of average lightning bolts (250) per square kilometer, per year.

The lightning is a one of a kind natural phenomenon resulting from the particularly unique geographic conditions in the area where the Catatumbo River and Lake Maracaibo meet. At this nexus point, hot, wet winds blowing in from the lake collide with the mountain ridges of the Andes to create a perfect storm. The conditions are like nowhere else on earth and result in continuous lightning storms which start and finish like clockwork.

This story documents the journey of Alan Highton and his tour group as they push deep into the Venezuelan backcountry in search of Catatumbo Lightning.

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Electric Skies: Chasing Catatumbo Lig...
Lake Maracaibo
By Transterra Media
20 Jun 2016

Buried deep in the jungles of Venezuela exists one of the world’s most unknown natural phenomenon: Catatumbo Lightning. Every year, Bahamian photographer and Catatumbo Lightning expert Alan Highton guides small groups of storm chasing tourists on a rugged 4-day journey through the precarious Venezuelan backcountry to his jungle guesthouse. Armed with waterproof bags, mosquito nets and other backcountry gear, the group must travel first by plane, then by road, and finally by boat. Once at the guesthouse they wait to witness Catatumbo Lightning first hand.

Catatumbo Lightning is a thundering symphony of relentless lighting storms concentrated in a small area. Occurring 140 to 160 nights a year, 10 hours per day and striking up to 280 times per hour, the storms are unmatched in their ferocity and unrelenting power. The Guinness Book of World Records will be adding Catatumbo Lightning to their list of record holders for the highest amount of average lightning bolts (250) per square kilometer, per year.

The lightning is a one of a kind natural phenomenon resulting from the particularly unique geographic conditions in the area where the Catatumbo River and Lake Maracaibo meet. At this nexus point, hot, wet winds blowing in from the lake collide with the mountain ridges of the Andes to create a perfect storm. The conditions are like nowhere else on earth and result in continuous lightning storms which start and finish like clockwork.

This story documents the journey of Alan Highton and his tour group as they push deep into the Venezuelan backcountry in search of Catatumbo Lightning.

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Dead Sea
Dead Sea
By Ralf Falbe
09 May 2015

Salty crust of the Dead Sea on the Israel-Jordan border. Due to climate change the Dead Sea is shrinking every year.

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Blizzardnyc ttm-1
Crown Heights, Brooklyn, NY
By Hugo Massa
27 Jan 2015

Brooklynites prepare themselves to face Winter Storm Juno on the eve of what "could be the the biggest snowstorm in the history of this city," according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Blizzardnyc ttm-2
Crown Heights, Brooklyn, NY
By Hugo Massa
27 Jan 2015

Brooklynites prepare themselves to face Winter Storm Juno on the eve of what "could be the the biggest snowstorm in the history of this city," according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Blizzardnyc ttm-3
Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, NY
By Hugo Massa
27 Jan 2015

Brooklynites prepare themselves to face Winter Storm Juno on the eve of what "could be the the biggest snowstorm in the history of this city," according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Blizzardnyc ttm-4
Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, NY
By Hugo Massa
27 Jan 2015

Brooklynites prepare themselves to face Winter Storm Juno on the eve of what "could be the the biggest snowstorm in the history of this city," according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Blizzardnyc ttm-5
Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, NY
By Hugo Massa
27 Jan 2015

Brooklynites prepare themselves to face Winter Storm Juno on the eve of what "could be the the biggest snowstorm in the history of this city," according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Blizzardnyc ttm-6
Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, NY
By Hugo Massa
27 Jan 2015

Brooklynites prepare themselves to face Winter Storm Juno on the eve of what "could be the the biggest snowstorm in the history of this city," according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Blizzardnyc ttm-7
Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, NY
By Hugo Massa
27 Jan 2015

Brooklynites prepare themselves to face Winter Storm Juno on the eve of what "could be the the biggest snowstorm in the history of this city," according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Heat
Sibuyan Island
By Ralf Falbe
18 Jan 2015

Women students protect their heads with umbrellas against the heat of the sun, Sibuyan Island, Philippines.

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Bangladesh 'at Risk' due to Climate C...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
28 Jun 2014

Rising global temperatures have been accompanied by changes in weather and climate, and many places have seen changes in rainfall, resulting in more floods, droughts, or intense rain, as well as more frequent and severe heat waves. Climate change is now one of the greatest threats facing the planet.

Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable countries, as the lives and livelihoods of millions of Bangladeshis are challenged due to climate change. A study by UK researcher Maplecroft cites Bangladesh at the top of a list of 32 nations at risk due to the alarming effects of climate change.

Low lying coastal areas are speculated to be submerged as the sea level rises, and as world temperature continues to go up. Two recent cyclones, Sidr (2007) and Aila (2009) totally devastated the coastal territories of Satkhira and Barguna along with many others in Bangladesh.

Hundreds if not thousands of people have lost their land and their homes to erosion along riverbanks and coastal areas. Bangladesh is one of the countries in the world with the highest proportion of the population living in coastal areas. Some 32% of the habitable land lies in coastal areas, equivalent to 47,211 square kilometers. According to the population census in 2001, about 35 million people, or 28% of the total population, live in these low-lying coastal areas.

Another cause for alarm that exacerbates the effects of climate change on the population in Bangladesh is pollution. By throwing waste chemicals and oil from factories into canals and rivers, soil and groundwater become polluted. Industrial processes are not only a factor in climate change, but also produce toxic waste that threatens Dhaka's natural resources.

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Philippine Air Force readies for typh...
villamor airbase
By Sherbien Dacalanio
07 Jun 2014

Villamor Airbase, Philippines - As wet or rainy season is set this June, soldiers from the Philippine Air Force (PAF) begin to check their rescue ambulance aircraft and conduct drills to prepare for possible rescue missions. The Air Force are among the first responders during calamities and with the country now experiencing the El Nino phenomenon, local weather agency, Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA predicts strong typhoons once the season starts.

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Folgefonna Glacier
Fjordland
By Ralf Falbe
16 Aug 2013

Ice climbing in heavy rain on the Folgefonna Glacier, Norway

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All gone
Moore, Oklahoma
By Daniela Gallardo
21 May 2013

Devastated house and car in the heart of the city of Moore, Oklahoma.

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Missing Parts
Moore, Oklahoma
By Daniela Gallardo
21 May 2013

A roof goes to the ground in an upside down world of devastation in Moore, Oklahoma.

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Ruins of Moore, Oklahoma
Moore, Oklahoma
By U.S. Editor
21 May 2013

Homes are reduced to rubble after the devastating tornado in Moore, Oklahoma.

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A Storm in Africa
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
07 May 2013

this picture was taken on our way from the Lagos international Airport to Bayelsa State.

Storms are very common in Nigeria during the spring and summer seasons, it mostly starts suddenly and can last anything from 10 minutes to several hours and sometimes days

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Drought in Brazil (24 of 25)
Bahia, Brazil
By Flavio Forner
18 Mar 2013

Animal cemetary where bones and carcasses are deposited. Many dead animals still transmit diseases. Many ranchers deposit carcasses in a specific place for the flies and vultures consume the dead animals.

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Drought in Brazil (25 of 25)
Bahia, Brazil
By Flavio Forner
18 Mar 2013

Farms are for sale. Many homeowners put their properties for sale and migrate to the coast in search of work.

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Drought in Brazil (7 of 25)
Vera Cruz, Bahia, Brazil
By Flavio Forner
17 Mar 2013

A private Truck sells potable water. (15,000 L for $ 90.00). Some travel 100km away in search of drinkable water. Many people can not afford to pay the price.

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Drought in Brazil (5 of 25)
Andaraí, Bahia, Brazil
By Flavio Forner
17 Mar 2013

A farmer walks with his cattle to graze on the side of highway.

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Drought in Brazil (4 of 25)
Andaraí, Bahia, Brazil
By Flavio Forner
17 Mar 2013

A Former farmer. After many years of drought, this is his biggest in 50 years

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Drought in Brazil (3 of 25)
Andaraí, Bahia, Brazil
By Flavio Forner
17 Mar 2013

A closed up house near the city of Andaraí where drought strongly affects the inhabitants, stands solitary except for a political poster farmers allow politicians to post in exchange for aid.

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Tens of thousands of children studyin...
Pakistan Administered Kashmir (PAK)
By objectivereporter
03 Mar 2013

Around 2, 800 schools were decimated by an earthquake that hit a large part of northern Pakistan in 2005. The government failed to reconstruct those schools even after 8 years, risking the lives of thousands of children who are forced to take lessons under the open sky in harsh winter and scorching summer. The government claims that it faces a paucity of funds to rebuild decimated schools while on the other hand, critics of government say most funds provided by the international community for rehabilitation have been directed to other projects. Officials say around 200,000 children in areas located above 5000 feet high altitude are compelled to continue study either in wall-less, roofless shelters or worn-out tents. Government claims that 1,100 schools out of total 2, 800 have so far been built while construction work 900 schools has been suspended due to want of funds. The construction work on 700 schools yet to be started. Due to non-availability of funds number of drop out of children have been increased as parents are reluctant to send their children to such schools due to health hazards.
The October 8, 2005 earthquake, which originated in the Himalayan mountains of Pakistan was the worst disaster in the history of the country; it left more than 70,000 dead, injured twice that number, left up to 1 million homeless and 1 million in immediate need of assistance.
The Government of Pakistan estimated that 17,000 children died, 23,000 children suffered disabilities and long-term injuries while more than 39,000 children lost one parent and 1,700 lost both parents. Thousands more were left homeless and vulnerable. Most of children died when they were in schools when earthquake struck the area razing sub-standard constructed schools buildings to ground and burying thousands of children alive

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Flooded Camp
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

The camps often flood due to poor drainage and the winter snowfall.

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Ground Water
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Ground water often floods the camps due to poor drainage and the winter snowfall.

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Drought in Brazil (9 of 25)
Vera Cruz, Bahia, Brazil
By Flavio Forner
10 Jan 2013

The cattle are too thin. The little grass that remains is taken by stronger animals.

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Jerusalem Snow (6 of 13)
Jerusalem, Israel
By Nili Bassan
09 Jan 2013

Late night walk thru the snow in downtown Jerusalem