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India' Third Gender
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
19 Jun 2017

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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Mobile App Combats Gender Violence in...
Tbong Khmum
By Ana Salvá
31 Mar 2015

Three women have received funding and technological support from the Asia Foundation to develop mobile applications in order to raise awareness of domestic violence in Cambodia and open the door for women who want to report abuses by mobile phone. According to the organization, 93.7% of Cambodians currently have a phone.

Sum Dany’s application is the first under development. "There will be four videos. One will give an explanation of the meaning of violence. Another will explain the risks faced by women and girls. The third will show the laws of violence and victims’ protection that can help them. Finally, the fourth will explain how traditional conduct discriminates against women. Some recommendations will be made. Then there will be a game with questions about gender violence”, she says.

22% of Cambodian women claim to have suffered from physical, sexual or emotional abuse from their husbands. 5% of Cambodian men have participated in at least one gang rape, one of the highest percentages of countries in Asia. Moreover, 38.4% of Cambodian men who committed an act of sexual aggression did not suffer any consequences for doing so.

Some women are discouraged from reporting the facts to the authorities out of fear they will not be believed. They consider going forward to the police a useless means of seeking justice. Worse, it could even worsen the situation by putting them in danger of retaliation, shame and the loss of reputation within their communities.

In cases of rape or abuse, the most common solution is to settle in court or employ the traditional code of conduct taught to girls in school that teaches them to remain silence in view of their husbands’ abuse. “Women in many cases are compensated with money. They are asked to keep quiet or leave home when their husband is angry”, says Dany. This code was removed from school curriculums in 2007 but its influence continues to be taught outside the classroom. 96.2% of Cambodian men and 98.5% of its women still think a woman should obey her husband.

Changing attitudes, whether online or in schools, is one of the basic tasks needed to break the silence imposed by Cambodian society on its women and girls.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Sample media
TALPAPRIL2017-12
London
By Tom Price
10 Mar 2015

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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Living Transgender in Pakistan
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
13 Dec 2014

Transgender people live in a precarious position in Pakistan. Despite gains made by the trans community in recent years - Pakistan’s Supreme Court allowed them to get national identity cards recognizing them as a third gender - transgender still face a lot of discrimination in society.

In some sectors of life they are tolerated, though in very defined roles. They often perform as a dancers at weddings and other celebrations where man and woman are strictly segregated. However, most transgender people, called “hijras” in Pakistan, live at the margins of society with very low status. The very word “hijra” is sometimes used in derogatory manner. Transgender have few employment opportunities available, so those who cannot get income performing at ceremonies often resort to begging or sex work.

To fight against discrimination and violence, a group of educated transgender activist are working at the Khawaja Sira Society (KSS) under the umbrella of a local Pakistani NGO called Naz Male Health Alliance. This center provide services for the local transgender community which include HIV/AIDS and STD diagnoses and treatment, and condom and lubricant distribution both via outreach as well as through clinics. At KSS the community find a secure and friendly environment where the  transgender community hopes to strengthen its people.

The United Nations and government estimates in 2012 put the number of HIV/AIDS cases around 87,000 in Pakistan alone with an overall prevalence of HIV infection in adults aged 15 to 49 is 0.1%. However, due to the conservative religious culture, political volatility and security matters, activists have to operate with minimal visibility.

As an Islamic Republic, Pakistan punishes same-sex behavior under Pakistan Penal Code Section 377,  an outdated, colonial law punishing same-sex relationships.

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Women in Construction
new york
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2014

If women are today represented in all professional sectors, they remain marginal in construction, a traditionally male realm. In the United States, they now account for around 13% of the workforce in New York, but only 3% nationally. Yet, the progress made is huge. In forty years, they have gradually shaken up the conventional ideas and earned their place on the field, by dint of skill and perseverance. In Manhattan, a school run by a non-profit organization trains every year as many as 500 women to get them into higher-paying jobs in construction trades. Often more involved than their male counterparts in the projects, these women impress with their professionalism. As Elise Harris, a journalist in the process of reconversion, Pia Hofmann, one of the few American women to operate a crane, or Barbara Armand, who runs a respected and successful construction management company. Here’s an overview of these New-Yorker women in construction and the challenges they face to achieve integration on a field which was until recently 100% male.

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Rumah Singgah: A Home for Jakarta's A...
Depok
By Elisabetta Zavoli
28 Feb 2014

Length: 7:01
English subtitles

"Rumah Singgah" literally means “shelter house." A project developed by Mami Yulie (Yulianus Rettoblaut), the leader of waria community (transgender M to F) in Indonesia, the shelter hosts elderly transgender with no means of living on their own for free. There, they create a sort of microcosm, a small community ruled by tight family-like bonds. Rumah Singgah is also Mami Yulie's home, where she lives with her own family: her foster children, her husband and sometimes her relatives. Almost all waria (transgender M to F) in Indonesia are chased away from their families of origin when relatives find out they are transgender people. When they are young they can survive thanks to prostitution, but when they become old and sick, many are left without others to help care for them. Rummah Singgah is a space where elderly waria care for each other and are looked after by Mami Yulie and the shelter's caretaker.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender01
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender02
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender03
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender04
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender05
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender06
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender07
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender08
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender09
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender10
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender11
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender12
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender13
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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Life in Malawi 5
Karonga, Nothern Region, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
16 Dec 2013

Maize Cultivation
At some point the lagoon used for irrigating the fields of the village ran dry. Investigation showed that the forest in the catchment area had been cut down for firewood. Now the forest is maintained, and cutting is made illegal. The water returned and the fields got irrigated again. Sweet potatoes from the field provide a meal for the family.

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Life in Malawi 3
Karonga, Nothern Region, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
16 Dec 2013

Sweet Potato Field
At some point the lagoon used for irrigating the fields of the village ran dry. Investigation showed that the forest in the catchment area had been cut down for firewood. Now the forest is maintained, and cutting is made illegal. The water returned and the fields got irrigated again. Sweet potatoes from the field provide a meal for the family.

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Life in Malawi 2
By Arjen van de Merwe
16 Dec 2013

Sweet Potato Cultivation
At some point the lagoon used for irrigating the fields of the village ran dry. Investigation showed that the forest in the catchment area had been cut down for firewood. Now the forest is maintained, and cutting is made illegal. The water returned and the fields got irrigated again. Sweet potatoes from the field provide a meal for the family.

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Life in Malawi 1
Karonga, Nothern Region, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
16 Dec 2013

Cooking Sweet Potatoes
At some point the lagoon used for irrigating the fields of the village ran dry. Investigation showed that the forest in the catchment area had been cut down for firewood. Now the forest is maintained, and cutting is made illegal. The water returned and the fields got irrigated again. Sweet potatoes from the field provide a meal for the family.

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Transgender in Nepal 5
Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
20 Sep 2013

Neelam, cleaning spinach, for her lunch on Sept 13, 2013. She loves cooking and likes Chinese food.

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Gay Rights Rally In Russia 7
St. Petersburg, Russia
By Yury Goldenshtein
17 May 2013

Some of several dozens of gay rights activists shouting slogans and hold posters during their rally in St. Petersburg.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Jhelum is located about 140 km from the capital Islamabad in northern Punjab. Jhelum city is located on the banks of the Jhelum river and is famous for having housed British soldiers during the colonial era.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Jhelum city is famous for a nearby military cantonment, which is one of the biggest in Pakistan. Grand Trunk road, also called GT road, runs through the city, making it a vital junction along the mighty road from Lahore to Peshawar.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Jhelum has been a stronghold of the Pakistani Muslim League during the last elections, and even in local body elections during the Musharaff rule.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

At 46 years old, Lubna is transgendered and an independent elections candidate.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Rejected because she is transgendered, Lubna lives away from her family.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna sits with Sidra, her friend and assistant in her election campaign. Lubna shares this home with 6 other transgenders who make their living by dancing in wedding ceremonies.

Very popular among the transgender community in Jhelum, Lubna is a former wedding dancer who decided to run for a seat in the provincial assembly. Now legally recognized, several transgender people are running for elections and working toward equal rights for the community.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna sits in her home, which she shares with other transgendered people, in the suburbs of Jhelum city.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna sits in her home with her friend and assistant Sidra. Very popular among the transgender community in Jhelum, Lubna is a former wedding dancer who decided to run for a seat in the provincial assembly. Now legally recognized, several transgender people are running for elections and working toward equal rights for the community.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Election campaign material for transgender candidate Lubna. She is using the electoral sign of a Cow in her campaign.

Very popular among the transgender community in Jhelum, Lubna is a former wedding dancer who decided to run for a seat in the provincial assembly. Now legally recognized, several transgender people are running for elections and working toward equal rights for the community.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna shares her small house with six wedding dancers, all of whom are transgendered.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna in her days as a dancer. Lubna does not dance anymore, but manages a group of transgendered dancers.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna leaves her home early in the morning to campaign for the upcoming election.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna leaves her home in suburbs of Jhelum city to campaign for elections.

Very popular among the transgender community in Jhelum, Lubna is a former wedding dancer who decided to run for a seat in the provincial assembly. Now legally recognized, several transgender people are running for elections and working toward equal rights for the community.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Election posters of Lubna Lal, also known as Madam Lubna Lal, can be see along the road to her home in the suburbs of Jhelum city in north Punjab.

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Lubna trying to convince a shopkeeper in inner city bazaar of Jhelum to vote for her. She is running for a provincial assembly seat.

Very popular among the transgender community in Jhelum, Lubna is a former wedding dancer who decided to run for a seat in the provincial assembly. Now legally recognized, several transgender people are running for elections and working toward equal rights for the community.