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Goma Refugees 11
Beni
By Luke Dennison
23 Jun 2016

A pygmy woman rests near Oicha, Beni territory, not far from the recent attack on July 5th. Pygmy’s, who have been forced out of their homes in the bush by the ADF, now seek refuge in mud huts closer to the village. June 23rd, 2016

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Goma Refugees 12
Beni
By Luke Dennison
23 Jun 2016

A pygmy man poses inside his mud hut near Oicha, Beni territory. The only aid remaining outside of Goma is RRMP (Rapid Response to Movement of People), an aid group helping those in immediate crisis from the conflicts. Refugees around the nation are all facing the same crisis – no more aid. June 23rd, 2016.

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Goma Refugees 03
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A child resident of Mugunga refugee camp. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 14
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A woman in Mugunga refugee camp makes charcoal, a common resource used by the refugees and sold at market. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 04
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

Children gather rain water in Mugunga refugee camp for drinking. Without aid supplying free water, many refugees cannot afford the commodity of clean drinking water. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 06
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A woman inside her home in Mugunga refugee camp washes dishes after preparing a meal of beans. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 08
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A child resident of Mugunga refugee camp stands outside her home. Many children have no memory of what their parents call home, as their entire life has been spent in the camps. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 13
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A man in Mugunga refugee camp expresses his frustration, saying, “It is better to go home and risk the rebels than die of starvation here. It is better to die and be buried at home.” He also explains that the plastic bottles he holds are what they are forced to used as firewood, when they cannot afford to purchase it. June 18, 2016.

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Goma Refugees 01
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

A view of Bulengo refugee camp on the outskirts of Goma, DRC. June 17, 2016

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Goma Refugees 02
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

Children watch as Mercy Corps distributes its last supply of water containers in Bulengo refugee camp. Mercy Corps was the last aid group to leave the camps surrounding Goma. June 17, 2016

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Goma Refugees 05
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

A man in Mugunga refugee camp sews material to be sold at market. June 17, 2016.

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Goma Refugees 07
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

Women residents of Mugunga refugee camp carry large bags of charcoal to be sold at the camps market. June 17, 2016

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Goma Refugees 09
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

Children in Mugunga refugee camp rest after hauling large bags of lava rock to be sold for building material. Since the eruption of Mount Nyiragongo in 2002, refugees have used the lava rock as foundation support around the tents as well as a means of survival. June 17, 2016

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Goma Refugees 10
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

A woman in Mugunga refugee camp sells potatoes at the market located in the center of the camp. Other popular vegetables being sold include cassava, maize, and beans. June 17, 2016

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 4
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Living spaces for recently arrived refugees from Kobane in the Darashakran refugee Camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 6
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Children playing in front of one of the more permanent settlements in the Darashakran refugee camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 7
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Boy staring at the distribution taking place in the Darashakran refugee camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 8
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Two boys dragging a small cart with goods for a woman from the distribution area to her home in Darashakran refugee camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 9
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

An old woman carries a box from the distribution area to her home through the heat along an empty street in Darashakran refugee Camp on 24 June 2015.

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 2
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

A woman waiting to receive items at distribution area in Darashakran refugee camp in the Kurdish Region of Iraq on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 3
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
23 Jun 2015

Two girls with a younger brother among the tents of Basirma refugee Camp in the Kurdish Region of Iraq on 23 June 2015.

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 5
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
23 Jun 2015

Children playing among the tents in Basirma refugee camp on 23 June 2015.

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Escaping Boko Haram: Nigerians Adapt ...
Jos
By jfaden
04 May 2015

Nigeria is a very diverse country, sometimes starting a new life in a different community other than one's own is a daunting task. However, the displaced people from Boko Haram dominated enclaves have no choice.

Samson, his two brothers, their wives, and their children fled their homes in Uvakh'a, about 5 kilometers from Gwoza, in northeastern Nigeria. They fled Boko Haram's onslaught and their hometown is now a stronghold of the militant group. The family is currently sheltering in the central Nigerian city of Jos, trying to start a new life, form a new community, and preserve their identity as they have little hope of going back to their village in the near future.

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The Refugee Crisis Continues in Iraq
Iraq
By Faysal Mortada
06 Jan 2015

Refugees from all over Iraq, who fled their homes in the wake of ISIS attacks, are now living in al Khazer camp near the Turkish border. Living conditions are hash and the refugees are suffering from a lack of food and water, and proper shelter against the winter.

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Iraqi Refugees Desperate for Healthcare
Diyala
By mushtaq mohammed
09 Dec 2014

November 9, 2014
Khanaqin, Diyala, Iraq

Refugees in the UNHCR camp, near the town of Khanaqin, are living in life threatening conditions. They were promised free check ups and treatment by the local government and NGOs but have so far received none. Forced to flee their homes in Mosul and other parts of the Nineveh province, after ISIS took over vast areas of northern Iraq, many of the refugees require urgent medical attention or suffer from incurable diseases. In desperation, some are using what little money they have for appointments with independent doctors who charge 1500 Iraqi Dinars ($1.30) just for a check up.

Transcription:

Um Majed, refugee, (Woman, Arabic):
(02:06-02:28) "I am a refugee from al-Saadeya, al-Asreya village. We fled five months ago. We were not offered any doctors or medication. I am sick and I have a slipped disc in my spinal chord. I cannot afford to go to a doctor. My husband had a stroke two years ago, we have to buy his medications for 4000-5000 Dinar ($3-4) a box and we cannot afford it. Nobody has came to check on us."

Mustafa, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:06-03:33) "I am a sick man, I suffer from five illnesses. I have had a heart attack and a stroke, I have diabetes, hight blood pressure and asthma. I suffer from so many diseases and we are here in the camp. We have no medication. My five year-old son has diabetes, it started six months ago, ever since the problems started."

Abdulqader, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:59-04:22) "If a doctor comes here, he charges 1500 Dinar ($1.30), We ask him to minimize the charge, he says that he has official receipts form the health directory of Diala. For chronic diseases he charges 1500 Dinar. How can people afford that? The doctor writes the prescription, and without providing any medications, he charges 1500 Dinar. None of the refugees have an income to afford that."

Abu Mohamed, refugee, (Man, Arabic): (04:44-04:56) "I have been running to help my daughter who is sick. I took her to the health care unit, and they have no medication. I spent over 40,000 Dinar ($35) on my sick daughters, all of them are sick."

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Philippines: Mindanao's Displaced Fac...
Mindanao
By Carlos Sardiña Galache
19 Nov 2014

Journalist Carlos Sardiña Galache travelled to Zamboanga, Philippines in October to cover the situation of IDPs and, more generally, the conflict in Mindanao in the light of the ongoing peace process between the MILF and the government. He interviewed several IDPs, Philippine army officers, Muslim activists, members of the MNLF and the MILF, and members of the local authorities, including the Mayor of Zamboanga.

FULL ARTICLE UPON REQUEST

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Tens of thousands of internally displaced people (IDPs) are still waiting to go back to their homes in the city of Zamboanga, in the restive island of Mindanao, in southern Philippines.

The conditions in the IDP camps are far from ideal and 186 people have died due to the unsanitary conditions in this and other camps since they were established.

A battle last year between a disgruntled faction of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) and the Philippine Army in the streets of the city left 218 people dead, more than ten thousand houses were destroyed and at least 120,000 people were left displaced. It was one of the latest violent episodes in a conflict between the government and Muslim militant groups which has been going on for more than four decades and has left at least 160,000 people killed.

“My house was burned after the fighting,” said 38 year-old IDP and activist Gaman Hassan. “The problem is that when we wanted to take some belongings from the house, the military didn’t allow us to go back, because it seemed to us that they are thinking we are also part of the rebels, and that’s why they don’t allow us to go back to our area, Rio Hondo. Our belongings were stolen. We believe that the soldiers burned many houses to better locate the rebels. It’s also a way to justify the looting.”

With an ongoing peace process between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), it is widely believed that the attack on Zamboanga was launched by the faction led by the MNLF founder and former chairman Nur Misuari, as an attempt to derail the peace negotiations.

“We will try to get Nur Misuari back in the fold, but sometimes he doesn’t agree with our ideas,” said MNLF Field Marshall Al-Hussein Caluang. “We can’t exclude Misuari from the MNLF, because there are a lot of people who follow him, particularly in Sulu and Zamboanga del Norte.”

The future is uncertain for the thousands of people displaced by the violence last year. Some of the areas where they used to live have been declared no-build zones for security reasons, amidst accusations by Muslim activists that the real motivation behind this decision by local authorities is purely political.

“The no-build zones are places with geo-hazards, which suffered big storm-surges between 2007 and 2013,” said Zamboanga’s Mayor Maria Isabel Climaco Salazar. “We can’t send back people there to stay, we can’t put them in dangerous areas. During the attack against Zamboanga City, those same places were the first areas that the MNLF used as entry points.”

In 2016 there will be a referendum by which each district will decide whether it wants to join the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region, and some suspect that the authorities are doing everything they can to get Zamboanga, a Christian-majority city with strong Spanish influences, out of the autonomous region.

“The local government in Zamboanga City is working against the inclusion of Zamboanga in Bangsamoro,” said Arasid Daranda, a local information officer for the MILF. “Their main purpose is to prevent the Muslim authority from operating in Zamboanga City. They want Zamboanga City out of the Moro grip, but publicly they claim they want peace.”

With extremist groups like Abu Sayaf operating in the area, kidnapping both Filipino nationals and foreigners, Mindanao is one of the most dangerous and potentially explosive areas in the Philippines and Southeast Asia.

“This ‘Asian’ latino city’ is a myth,” said Father Ángel Calvo, who has lived and worked as a missionary in Mindanao since 1972. “That belongs to the past. There’s nothing Latin in Zamboanga anymore. This is a multi-cultural community. We have eight or nine ethno-linguistic groups here, everybody with their own interests, naturally. This is very explosive. The government doesn’t realize this.”

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Securing the Sanctuary: YPG Fighters ...
Afrin
By Shirwan Qasim
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Afrin, Syria

While the Syrian-Kurdish cantons of Kobane and Qamishle remain under ISIS pressure and siege, the third Kurdish canton of Afrin is preparing to face any threats that may come its way and continue to be a refuge for minorities and other civilians fleeing ISIS, al-Nusra Front, and the Syrian Government. Part of these preparations involve the establishment of training camps for fighters from the Kurdish People's Protection Units, also known as the YPG. The commando training camp on the outskirts of Afrin is run by a woman named Busayna, who honed her military skills in the Qandil mountains of Iraq and now teaches them to the fighters of Afrin. Together with their male counterparts, the women of the YPG are now playing an integral part in securing one of the last safe Kurdish refuges in Syria.

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Fighting continues to displaced Afgha...
Kabul
By LK
04 Jul 2014

International combat troops may be preparing to withdraw from Afghanistan at the end of the year, but the escalating insurgency continues to drive Afghans from their homes. Helmand Province has been hit hardest by the Taliban insurgency, sending thousands of families fleeing to Kabul for safety. Some find shelter, but little else, at an IDP camp on the outskirts of Kabul. Lucy Kafanov reports. NOTE: THIS VIDEO IS NOT FOR SALE BUT FOR SAMPLE PURPOSES ONLY.

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Burma: 40 Year War Continues to Displ...
Kachin State
By Antolo
10 Jun 2014

Kachin State, Burma

Tens of thousands in Burma's Kachin state have been forced from their homes as fighting continues between Burmese government forces and the autonomist guerrilla group, the Kachin Independence Army (KIA). The ethnic Kachin, from the mountainous north of Burma, speak a different language than that of Burma’s Bamar majority and are also Christian, in contrast with the country's Buddhist majority. Since 1961, both sides have been at war for political and economic control over the Kachin state, which is rich in natural resources.

While there is hope that a dialogue between the government and the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO, the political wing of the KIA) will bear fruit, sporadic fighting continues and it is taking a huge toll on the local population. Many fields are strewn with landmines and tens of thousands of Kachin have had to relocate to temporary camps.

Most of these internally displaced people (IDPs) are sheltered in camps within the strip of territory along the Chinese border controlled by the KIO/KIA. There are also some camps in government controlled zones. For almost two years, the Burmese government has blocked any international aid to the IDPs and they have had to rely solely on help provided by local organizations. Many have been living in camps since the fighting resumed and are losing all hope of ever returning home.

In government-controlled areas, some IDPs have been arrested on spurious charges of collaboration with the KIA and tortured under detention. This has created a climate of fear in camps that are closely watched by Burmese security forces.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in Shansharah ruins in the north-west of the country are acting as cadavers crawling out of the grave. When they arrived, families cleaned the graveyards of bones, foliage and detritus.

Les enfants qui vivent dans les ruines de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent à mimer la sortie des cadavres des tombeaux où ils vivent. Lorsqu’elles sont arrivées les familles ont nettoyé les caveaux de leurs ossements, feuillages et détritus.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in the Shansharah archeological site in the north-east have fun in the ruins. They lauch stones into the tall herbs where the insects live that transmit leshmania are. This skin disease devastates this rural region.

Les enfants qui vivent dans le site archéologique de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent dans les ruines. Ils en profitent pour lancer des cailloux dans les herbes hautes où se trouvent les insectes qui transmettent la leishmaniose, maladie de peau qui fait des ravages dans cette région rurale.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

It has been one year since the child refugees on the Shansharah archeological site in the Idlib region have gone to school. :Our school has been bombed by the army, we hope to start studying again when everything will be over."
Depuis un an les enfants réfugiés du site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb ne vont plus à l'école. « Notre école a été bombardée par l'armée, on espère retourner étudier quand tout se terminera ».

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

The children show an olive tree branch which they dry to add to some soup. The hundreds of displaced living on the Shansharah archeological site have very restricted access to food. Very few organizations assist them. Only the jihadist Ahrar el-Sham group provide a regular humanitarian help to them.
Les enfants montrent des branches d’oliviers dont ils font sécher les feuilles pour cuisiner de la soupe. Les centaines de déplacés vivant sur le site archéologique de Shansharah ont un accès restreint à la nourriture. Peu d’organisations les assistent. Seul le groupe djihadiste Arrar el Cham leur distribue une aide humanitaire régulière.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib Province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Child infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.
Un enfant atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Child infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.
Un enfant atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children living in the Shansharah archeological site swim in the ancient baths. Microbes proliferate in the water of this artificial swimming pool which is used both for washing the dishes and laundry. Those unhygienic conditions exacerbate the spread of disease.

Les enfants qui vivent sur le site archéologique de Shansharah se baignent dans les anciens thermes. Les microbes pullulent dans l’eau de cette piscine artificielle qui sert à la fois à la lessive et à la vaisselle. Ces conditions d’hygiène aggravent la propagation des maladies.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Entry of a graveyard occupied by a refugee family on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. It has been one year since hundreds of displaced people have taken shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes. The young Ahmad is complaining about the very hard living conditions of his daily life. There is no running water and electricity. « When it is raining we have to go out of the graveyard because it is full of water ».

Entrée d'un tombeau occupé par une famille réfugiée sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord-ouest du pays. Eloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne. Le petit Ahmad se plaint des conditions de vie déplorables dans lesquelles ils vivent. Ils ne disposent ni d'eau courante, ni d’électricité.
« Quand il pleut trop, nous sommes obligés de sortir car le tombeau se remplit d'eau ».

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

This woman holds the jacket of her dead son while he was fighting against the regime with the FSA. Her four sons, all fighters, died fighting the regime.

Cette femme tient le blouson de son fils mort au combat aux cotés de l’armée syrienne libre. Ses quatre fils, tous combattants contre le régime sont décédés.