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Brazilian Families Affected by Zika i...
Recife
By Flavio Forner
26 Jan 2016

Photos of Brazilian families affected by the outbreak of the Zika virus in the city of Recife, in northeast Brazil, as mothers seek help for their babies born with microcephaly.

The Brazilian army is deployed on the streets of Recife in a door-to-door campaign in search of vestiges of Aedes mosquito larvae, responsible for spreading the Zika virus. The population receives instructions on how best to protect and prevent the emergence of mosquitoes in their homes.

The Zika virus, first detected about 40 years ago in Uganda, has long been seen as a less-painful cousin to Dengue and Chikunguya, which are spread by the same Aedes mosquito. Brazilian health authorities are convinced that microcephaly is related to the Zika virus when a pregnant woman is bitten by this insect. This rare condition known as microcephaly often results in mental retardation.

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zika in brazil 19
Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Mother holds her baby, born with microcephaly, waiting medical attention at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil.

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zika in brazil 20
Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Pregnant woman waits for consultation at a clinic in Recife, Brazil.

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zika in brazil 17
Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, takes her 4 month-old daughter Alice to a medical consultation by Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden. Alice was born with microcephaly.

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zika in brazil 18
Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden measures Alice's skull. The 4 month-old baby was born with microcephaly. Alice's mother is Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator.

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zika in brazil 07
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Recife's Health Department workers and soldiers from the Brazilian military work together in detecting mosquito outbreaks.The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

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zika in brazil 08
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier checking a house in Recife for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes Aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

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zika in brazil 09
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier and Recife's Health Department worker talk to local resident to check for Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

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zika in brazil 10
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A biologist works in a laboratory at Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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zika in brazil 11
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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zika in brazil 12
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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zika in brazil 13
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

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zika in brazil 14
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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zika in brazil 15
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Because of the mild symptoms of Zika virus, few people visit a doctor so the government does not know how many Brazilians are already infected. Pernambuco state is the leader with 33 percent probability of microcephaly. The regional government declared a state of emergency in last September.

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zika in brazil 16
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

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zika in brazil 01
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela Rocha, 67, infectologist at the Oswaldo Cruz hospital in Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil).

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zika in brazil 02
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Mothers awaiting care in the waiting room at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife.

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zika in brazil 03
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator with her 4 month-old daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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zika in brazil 04
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Erika Roque with her son Eric, born with microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, where he receives physical therapy.

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zika in brazil 05
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela, infectious disease specialist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, shows an image of the skull of a child with microcephaly.

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zika in brazil 06
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Rafael, an official from Recife's Health Department at a meeting on actions to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, insect that spreads the Zika virus.

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zika in brazil 21
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his daughter Alice, one of many Brazilian babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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zika in brazil 22
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Jonathan Gomes Bezerra, a 14 year-old student, holds his sister Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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zika in brazil 23
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator baths her daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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zika in brazil 24
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, worker at Recife airport, and Nadja Gomes bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, with their daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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zika in brazil 25
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his crying daughter Alice. She is one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Life after Ebola in Liberia: A Diffic...
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to everyday life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems. Survivors living on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia share their experiences of illness, loss, and coping with a new reality as the disease is slowly but surely eradicated from their area.

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

After one week of throwing up, Bindu, 23, went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

Helena Henry (30) and her brother were the first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Ebola Survivors 01
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

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Maternal issues through Ebola 05
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Health workers were afraid to accept Comfort at the local hospital when she needed to give birth. They thought she might be caught with Ebola, so they turned her away. Comfort is aiming at the spot right on the streets where she gave birth. To twins. In the rain.

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Ebola Survivors 08
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Rosanna's organization helps Ebola survivors to cope with the loss around Ebola.

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Ebola Survivors 09
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 10
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 11
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU) lies all but condemned on the outskirts of Monrovia.

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Ebola Survivors 12
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

All of this woman's family members died; only grand children remain. Now, her house is empty.

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Ebola Survivors 13
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola survivor does the dishes outside her home in Monrovia. Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 14
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 02
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

After one week of throwing up, Bindu (23) went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

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Ebola Survivors 04
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Helena Henry (30) and her brother the were first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

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Ebola Survivors 06
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 07
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.