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Witches Compass
New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
10 Oct 2014

Brooklyn, 10/14
The season of the witch is back. From American Horror Story: Coven to a new exhibit at the British Museum called “Witches and Wicked Bodies,” witches are once again ascendant. The current neo-pagan revival is less evocative of the cutest witches we met in 1990’s – it is distinctly feminist. The new witch culture blends a kind of radical eroticism with metaphysical liberation — and it aims to change the world.
On the weekend of October 10th, we attended and shot the first anniversary of the Witches Compass, a monthly gathering of appropriately attired occultists at Kateland, a bookstore in Bushwick, Brooklyn that is at the epicenter of the local pagan universe. Katelan Foisy (also a painter, model, and tarot card reader) lead attendees through an immersive ritual cleansing to honor the Hunter’s Moon — with massive paper moons on display. Katelan and her witch-colleague Damon Stang are pioneers of the occult revival happening in this hipster enclave. A few days after the Witches Compass, I sat down for an interview with Katelan and Fred Jennings, the co-owner of Kateland. They explained what makes the third contemporary resurgence of the occult so different than the ones that have come before. Intrinsically feminist, LGBT-friendly, and politically active by nature, the new witches are in it for far more than just love spells.

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Egypt’s National Council for Women Re...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
22 Oct 2012

Egypt’s National Council for Women expressed rejection of the first draft of the country’s new revolution for allegedly limiting women’s rights, feminists said on Monday, October 22, in a press conference held at the Journalists Syndicate headquarters in Cairo.

Many male political activists also attended the conference to show solidarity with women and voice rejection of the new constitution draft.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mervat Tellawy, head of the National Council for Women:
“The new constitution that comes after January 25 Revolution must not diminish the rights of women, children, family, judiciary institutions, Al-Azhar honorable institution, the freedom of expression and creativity.”

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – George Ishaaq, political activist and founder of Kefaya Movement:
“We want Egypt’s women to be on equal footing with Egypt’s men, particularly in the Constituent Assembly (CA) that drafts the constitution. The CA is invalid.”

Feminists and human rights activists stressed that women worked side by side with men during January 25 Revolution in 2011 that ousted former president Hosni Mubarak.

Among the controversial articles in the draft constitution is one replacing “trafficking of women” to “violating the rights of women,” which feminists see as evasive and rubbery that doesn’t address the crime of human trafficking in the international law.

The attendees said that the articles about women’s right in the draft constitution are considered “repressive.”

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 22, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 22, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Medium shot, the Syndicate of Journalist in Cairo
2. Various shots, a number of women raising signs demanding women’s rights and equality with men
3. Wide shot, the press conference, the attendees applauding for Mervat Tellawy, head of the National Council for Women, during her speech
4. Various shots of the attendees
5. Medium shot, Tellawy speaking during the press conference
6. Close shot, a reporter taking notes
7. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mervat Tellawy, head of the National Council for Women:
“The new constitution that comes after January 25 Revolution must not diminish the rights of women, children, family, judiciary institutions, Al-Azhar honorable institution, the freedom of expression and creativity.” 8. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – George Ishaaq, political activist and founder of Kefaya Movement:
“We want Egypt’s women to be on equal footing with Egypt’s men, particularly in the Constituent Assembly (CA) that drafts the constitution. The CA is invalid.” 9. Various shots of the conference and the attendees
10. Various shots of the attendees
11. Wide, pan left shot, Syndicate of Journalist in Cairo