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Life Along The Railway (15 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A boy is sitting on the railway tracks next to a makeshift home where he is living with his family.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (9 of 11)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

An old woman in her cluttered makeshift home near the railway tracks in an area populated by slums in Dakha, Bangladesh. Dakha is home to more than 10 million people, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Hundreds of people live beside the railroad in the Kawran Bazar slum, where residents face dire conditions in the unsanitary environment. Dhaka, Bangladesh, June, 2013.

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Life Along The Railway (17 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

Old woman inside her home living right next to the railroad tracks.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (18 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A woman is sleeping with her son inside one of the makeshift homes next to the railroad tracks.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (19 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A colorful woman is walking through a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (5 of 11)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

People sleeping inside a makeshift home in a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (23 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A girl is eating inside her home in a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (24 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A skinny man is on his way to collect tap water which is scarce in the slum.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (25 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

An old couple is preparing food outside their makeshift home in a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (26 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A woman is sleeping outside a makeshift home in a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (27 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

An old woman is wearing darf sunglasse after she recentley underwent an eye surgery.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (28 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A group of kids is standing in fron of their makeshift home in a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Italy under eviction
Milan, Italy
By Alice Sassu
14 Jun 2013

Arnold, his wife Mardy and their sons Adrian, Alessa and Angel Mauhay used to live in a 35 sq.m. two-room apartment.

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Asian Families Face Evictions In Italy
Milan, Italy
By U.S. Editor
14 Jun 2013

Technically, it's called “arrearage innocent”: indicating people will be evicted because with their scarce income they are unable to pay the rent.
The families with many members are the most vulnerable; families of up to 6 often live in a 40 square meter apartments with little or no means to apply to public housing to relocate.
While social emergency demands increase rapidly, just in the city of Milan 5.000 public houses remain empty, waiting to be surveyed and put in condition to be inhabited.

The Mauhay family is from Philippines. Arnold, Mardy and their children Adrian, Alessa and Angel, were living in a house in the north of Milan. The building was very badly maintained, the stairs had no lights and the dangerous electric wiring affected their house. After their eviction they are living in a hotel with the support of the municipality.

Kumara and Mary are from Sri Lanka. They, as many others, are victims of the illegal rent black market. As they are undocumented migrants it is impossible for them to register without permits for a housing contract. When they tried to ask the owner to give them a proper lease, he increased the rent. They were unable to pay and soon after received an eviction notification. Now Kumara is living in his car, and Mary is hosted in protection housing with their son, Nathaka.

During the realization of this project I've built a close relationship with several families. In the beginning I tried to follow their stories from the notification to the eviction, but when the police and the legal officer avoid me to take photos during these moments, I had to focus my attention on other aspects of their stories, like details that could reveal the dramatic experience they were experiencing. After the eviction, in fact, some families went to hosting structures, another part moved to hotels with the support of the municipality, while many others had no other choice but to sleep on the streets while they wait for a public social house, to which they are entitled.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (7 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

The miniature carnival out front of the mosque is a large draw for families, giving children an opportunity to ride swings and play games.

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Kenya Kibera Infrastructure (8 of 22)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
03 May 2013

Residents from Kibera walk past roadworks and sewage as a road expansion project is widening a road in Kibera, one of the largest slum's in Africa, 3 May 2013 .The work forms part of a bypass road that will run around and through the slum of Kibera and will benefit residents by bringing more business to the area.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
01 May 2013

Workers in Lahore, Pakistan, observe International Labor Day. Workers in Pakistan face dangerous working conditions, often supporting their families on a dollar a day.

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A Story of A Syrian Village
Homs, Syria
By Smart Media
01 May 2013

Oyoun Hsain is a small village located in the northeastern countryside of Homs with a population of less than 4000 people.
The area was not subjected to either armed or peaceful revolutionary movements, but it fell victim to shelling and other destructive measures.
A massacre was on the verge of occurring, but the Free Syrian Army intervened and stopped it by evacuating the villagers away.

However, many people were killed due to the continuous shelling by warplanes, artillery and tanks from the battalion next to the village. Mercenaries also broke into the village several times and killed people. In addition to that, more than 120 people were kidnapped. Until this moment, nobody knows anything about what happened to those kidnapped people.
The film shows the destruction in the village after the evacuation of its inhabitants.
The buildings’ ruins embed the village’s memory, the people’s properties and their children’s food.

The film authenticates the story of the village. The film is a call for humanity sent to the neighboring villages, where mercenaries live in and still support the regime. It reminds them of the past years when they lived peacefully together; when all the sects in Syria lived in peaceful coexistence.
The film aims to wake up the remnant of humanity and mercy in neighbors’ hearts; the friends yesterday and the executioners today.

Transcript:
00:47 This is Oyoun Hsain Al-Janoubiah with a population of 1700 to 2000 people

00:53 It was living a normal life with its neighbor villages, one of them is Al-Ameriah, Hsain Al-Shamaliah Oyoun Al-Dananeer and Al-Misherfih villages

01:01 The regime recruited these villages a long time ago to prevail the sectarian nature on the revaluation. We lived with them in peace and we had a cordiality relationships; real normal relationships

01:15 In the recent period, The Al-Ameriah people who were supported by Al-Asad gang. They were harassing the village all the time

01:24 They were threatening us by Dushka guns and Armed Ganges and striking us from near areas until they deported their own villages' people, then suddenly, and with no warning, they started to shell this small village

1:43 God is great, God is great, God is great!

01:51 Doesn't he have any mercy shelling us like? We don't have any guns. We don't have any thing. We don't have any weapons. We don't have anything

01:59 To take out our children from the debris. What did we do to him? Look at this. Have a look at how he shelled us. Look at that, people? Doesn't he fear God? What did we do to him ? What did we do? Look at that.

02:09 He destroyed the water tanks. He destroyed the lands, the windows, too. We have nothing anymore, nothing at all

02:16 This house, this house; he destroyed it above its people. The children and their mother were sitting here. They were sitting here, in this specific house. Does he need to pull it down on us? What did we do to him? The mercenaries came and stole the doors and the windows of the houses They left us nothing. They left us nothing. They stole everything.

02:26 What did we do to them? These are our houses. Destroyed, they are all pulled down

02:46 I couldn't take a Jar of Makdouse or olives from my house. I paid for this jar and preserve it to feed my children. He made me throw it away

02:57 This teapot, which I want to make tea with; I couldn't make tea for my children. He made me lose it

03:03 These are my children's clothes. Doesn't he fear God? What are these? These dishes, he broke these dishes to prevent us from eating or drinking, he wants to kill us. What is worse than that?

03:15 These lentils, I brought for my children and I couldn't take it with me

03:20 Doesn't he fear God to do that? Doesn't he fear God? What did we do to him?

03:26 My house, can I live in it now?

03:32 We called the free army, God bless them. They came and took out our children and wives and the old people. And we, the young people went with our wives and old people because we have nothing.

03:43 We don't have guns or weapons because we were living in peace. We were like a family.

03:47 The free army comes and asks us: what is the situation in here? We say, they are our family, our people, our brothers. Don't hurt them.

03:55 When the free army came we told them: don't harm them. They are our family, our brothers. We are living together, they wouldn't hurt us.

04:04 The free army goes. Until some day we went to beg the free army to ask them to take out our children and wives from the destroyed houses.

04:12 There were people sitting in here, people were sitting here. Imagine, people were sitting here, he shelled us with MiGs

04:19 Doesn't he fear God? I swear to God that is unbelievable

04:23 Look at that! We were sitting and watching TV. We were sitting, in the house here. Look at that, we didn't move anything.

04:32 Look at the glass. We were sitting peacefully. If the free army didn't come,

04:36 God bless them, God bless them, we wouldn't get out alive from here, we and our children and wives

04:41 And let them deal with the Asad gangs. We have nothing to do with them

04:45 We will come back to the village, against your will, against your will Asad gangs. We will come back to our village, God willing, with the free army's help.

04:55 The free army will bring us back to our village and protect us. We don't want your protection. We want the free army to protect us, because you betrayed us. We were with you, but you betrayed us.

05:05 You said the free army is armed gangs. They are not armed gangs. Now you are the armed gangs

05:10 You are shelling us with missiles. At least the armed gangs you were talking about is the free army, who is better than you. They didn't shell us with missiles. They took out our children from the debris, from the bricks. did you do for us? Tell me what did you do for us? You broke the electricity pedestals. These are your reforms?You are shelling us with cannons. Do it. Do it, we don't fear anyone but God.

05:31 We don't fear anyone but God. What do you have more? Do you have anything else to shell us with? You don't have any? Shell us, as much as you want.

05:45 My neighbors of the other sect. We sit together, eat the same food, drink the same water and we stay together. What did we do to them? Ask them, people, did we hurt them? We didn't hurt them, we didn't fight with them.

05:58 If they need anything, they come to me. If I need anything I go to them. What did we do to them? He destroyed our houses. He shelled us with cannons and tanks. What do we have to shell him back with? What do we have?

06:11 Where are the people? The people left are living in wild, under trees. Who is with us?Just us. Let him come to us. Let him come to kill us. What more does he have?

06:24 He shelled us with MiG, helicopters and exploding barrels. What these things are, we didn't know them before him. He threw barrels on us; cannons and tanks, he doesn't have anything else

06:35 He brought MiGs here to shell this store, MiG! A warplane! Squadron …Because we have? What makes him send a warplane? We have bomb action guns to fire on the Warplane. He sent the warplane, because we are making two hundred Syrian pounds a day.

06: 49 We thought that he has warplanes to fight Israel. He has it to fight us, Oyoun Hsain Al-Janoubiah village

06:56 Read this "Oyoun Hsain Al-Janouby school"

07:01 This school is for our children or not! Say that we are lying and this is not a school; that this is not a school. Is this a school or what? Whose this for? Isn't it for my children? Isn't it for my children?

07:14 Look at it, they shelled it. Look at it. They made holes in it

07:18 Have a Look inside it. They broke windows and doors. Have a look in here Look, This is the school, This is the school

07:54 "avant-garde promise""I promise in front of my classmates to be a perfect avant-garde -1" "To do my duty to the country, the party and the leader -2" to act according the law of the avant-garde and do good every -3"

"day "Directorate of Education in Homs" "Oyoun Al-Hsain Al-Janoubiah school C2" "first term exam 2006/2007" ":class" ":course" ":number" ":paper numbers" ":absence" ":corrector" ":checker" "Directorate of Education in Homs"

08:47 "Oyoun Hsain Al-Janouby school" "first circle"

08:50 Now, the shelling still going on in the village areas. So he shelled it with helicopters and MiG warplane. And he shelled the sensitive positions in this village.

09:03 He destroyed the mosques. He made them debris

09:07 He shelled the main water tank which nourishes the village with water and removed all life factors in it

09:33 We used to pray in this mosque, he destroyed it.

09:41 He destroyed this mosque; we were praying in it. He destroyed it by tanks

09:47 swear to God, he destroyed our mosque by tanks. Have a look, he destroyed all. We were praying in it

09:55 What were we doing but praying in here? He shelled us with cannon because we were praying? Doesn't he fear God? Don't you fear God? We were praying here. What were we doing? I swear we were praying here. Should you shell us with cannon because we were praying in here? Should you shell us with tank because we were praying? What are we doing against you?

10:22 There is a cannon near here, it's 130 caliber which is shelling the village constantly, also with tanks and mortars until it destroyed this village almost completely.

10:38 God is great, God is great. God is great, God is great. God is great - God is great.

10:53 Now there are no people in this village. Nobody lives in it but the resistor free army

11:32 Keep your head down

11:35 There is a tank over there. I hope that we hurt it. We attacked it last time. And there is a village over there. In the south, there is lots of mercenaries in it. There is a tank there, it attacks us, too. the cannons and the barracks are behind it

11:54 they are fortified and hiding

11:58 They made trenches

12:04 Of course we came in to take out the people. We took out all the people from the village to repel the Asad gangs who tried to make a Massacre in Oyoun Hsain village, I mean here in this village. We went in and took out all the people. Now we are sitting here in the front line to repel the gangs of the tyrant

12:28 He really is a tyrant

12:33 As you see, we are in the front lines, in rain, wind and cold weather. Thank God we are defeating them. God willing, they will not come forward any step here, God willing, we will go forward until we defeat him. Him and his mercenaries.

13:00 As you can see, here are our brothers. Here are our brothers

13:11 There is one hole, one sniper. You can come to see through the hole

13:27 They wanted to come in this small village to do a massacre here. Certainly nobody would know about this small village until a massacre takes place in it. Nobody knows about it so far. If a massacre took place in it, all people would know about it. We are a few in numbers who came in to take out the people

13:46 We have light weapons not big weapons, I mean small weapons. But thank God we made trenches. We are taking positions and can't leave this place at all because it's facing them.

14:04 We are completely facing them. So If we leave this place, they can come forward then as they have tanks, and they made trenches inside their area.

14:17 For what? We don't know

14:20 I hear you Abo-Abdo. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul

14:40 Our neighbors are from the other sect; we are living together, eat same food and drink same water. We have nothing against them. He kept shelling us until he separated us and made it a sectarian issue. He is the one who made it like this. We were not sectarian people

14:55 He is shelling everyday. He calls for mercenaries to attack us. Why? What did we do to him? We don't want anything

15:02 We don't want anything anymore

15:07 Attack us. Leave, we don't want you anymore. We don't want you to stay in here

15:12 We are one family, we are neighbors. Our lands are next to yours. If the regime leaves or not, we are going to live together again. Don't think about it. Don't be drifted by the regime. Don't be drifted by the tyrant Bashar

15:25 Wake up, come back to your families, to your neighbors. We will be neighbors, families, forever.

15:32 He will do with you as he did with us. Don't think that he will leave you in peace. But we still one family

15:37 Wake up and go back to your village, to your people. I won't say more

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos
Luang Prabang, Laos
By U.S. Editor
26 Apr 2013

Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations, and relies heavily on foreign aid and donations. People in Laos continue to struggle with severe poverty, and have extremely low life expectancy despite the country's booming tourism industry.

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International Children's Day (14 of 18)
Ankara, Turkey
By Amy Hume
23 Apr 2013

Anıtkabır
Turkey's International Children's Day, April 23, was created in 1927. In addition to local school celebrations, many people pay their respects to the Turkish Republic's founding father, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk on this day. Atatürk, who adopted 13 children, stressed the importance of education for future success of the Republic.

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International Children's Day (11 of 18)
Ankara, Turkey
By Amy Hume
23 Apr 2013

Changing of the Guards
Turkey's International Children's Day, April 23, was created in 1927. In addition to local school celebrations, many people pay their respects to the Turkish Republic's founding father, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk on this day. Atatürk, who adopted 13 children, stressed the importance of education for future success of the Republic.

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International Children's Day (10 of 18)
Ankara, Turkey
By Amy Hume
23 Apr 2013

Turkey's International Children's Day, April 23, was created in 1927. In addition to local school celebrations, many people pay their respects to the Turkish Republic's founding father, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk on this day. Atatürk, who adopted 13 children, stressed the importance of education for future success of the Republic.

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Homemade oil refineries (11 of 12)
Ad darbasiyah, syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
18 Apr 2013

Abu Zecharia sells diesel and petrol per liter, and sometimes per half-liter, in Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in Shansharah ruins in the north-west of the country are acting as cadavers crawling out of the grave. When they arrived, families cleaned the graveyards of bones, foliage and detritus.

Les enfants qui vivent dans les ruines de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent à mimer la sortie des cadavres des tombeaux où ils vivent. Lorsqu’elles sont arrivées les familles ont nettoyé les caveaux de leurs ossements, feuillages et détritus.

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Serekaniye or Ras al Ayn?
Ras al Ain, Syria
By U.S. Editor
13 Apr 2013

A photojournalist captures the forces that are involved in the conflict of Ras al-Ayn, Syria, and the civilians effected by the ongoing conflict. The photographs lead-up to the fighting that drove members from Jabhat al-Nusra and the FSA from the city on July 17. It is a battle for control over the identity of this ancient city — called Serekaniye by the Kurdish fighters and Ras al-Ayn by Arabs — that exemplifies the complexity of Syria’s civil war and the different ideologies involved. The YPG want autonomy. Jabhat al-Nusra is fighting for an Islamic state. The Free Syrian Army, who are allied with Jabhat al-Nusra, is losing morale and desperate for weapons and supplies. The journalist was in the city during the time of the second ceasefire. Pictured are the homes of Assad supporters who have since disappeared, Jabhat al-Nusra fighters, YPG and the Kurdish Women Defense Forces (YPJ), who were the catalyst for the most recent fighting.

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Life In The Graves
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By U.S. Editor
13 Apr 2013

In the Idlib region, North-Western Syria, hundreds of families take refuge in the "dead cities", which are Byzantine and Christian archeologic sites from the 3rd to the 6th Century.
In the Shansharah site, 80 km from Aleppo, Syrian displaced people have transformed graves into shelters: these dark and humid places are the only safe place they found to protect themselves from rockets, mortar and air attack.
Even if this part of the Idlib region has been liberated from the regime by rebels, bombings and air attacks from the Syrian army still are the daily fate of the inhabitants. Most of the Shansharah refugees are coming from Kafr Nabel and Kafr Rouma, two free cities regularly targetted by the Syrian army.
Living conditions are extremely hard in the Shansharah site : there is no electricity and running water. The closest water well is three kilometres far from the site. Displaced people go there everyday to get water. In the site there is only an ancient thermae with stagnate water that can be used to wash dishes and the clothes. Children often dive into this microbes nest. As a consequence, diseases are proliferating because of the lack of hygiene. The first disease is however coming from an insect: the leshmaniose, which gives big and red spots that erode the skin; it is spreading among Shansharah's displaced people, especially children. No organization is providing them any treatment.

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

A child rides his bike in Gadaffi's compound

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

Abdul Baset Al-Shibl
Security Guard

‘We try to make Bab Al-Azizia safe, but it’s not safe. Recently we found four bodies. Three of them were women and all of them had been shot in the head.

My militia helped to make a database of everyone living here. There’s more than 300 families and each one has its number spray painted on the wall next to its home. We gave a copy of the database to the interior ministry but never heard anything back.’

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
03 Apr 2013

Abdul Baset Al-Shibl
Security Guard

‘We try to make Bab Al-Azizia safe, but it’s not safe. Recently we found four bodies. Three of them were women and all of them had been shot in the head.

My militia helped to make a database of everyone living here. There’s more than 300 families and each one has its number spray painted on the wall next to its home. We gave a copy of the database to the interior ministry but never heard anything back.’

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Holi: The Festival Of Color Observed ...
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
26 Mar 2013

Holi, the Hindu festival of color, is being celebrated across the country. The Hindu community celebrates Holi in their neighborhoods, smearing colored powders and throwing water balloons at one another on this colorful and joyful event.

Photo By Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Nowroz In Kurdistan
Batman, Turkey
By U.S. Editor
19 Mar 2013

A concert of traditional Kurdish music is held at a festival for Nowroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring, as well as the start of the new calendar year in the Persian system. Nowroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds, Afghans, Tajiks and Iranians in the Middle East and Central Asia by wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Nowroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marred by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey

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Newroz in Kurdistan (32 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

A woman holds her brightly colored chid at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (31 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

A girl is dresssed up as a PKK flighter at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (26 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Men play traditional instruments at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Children, victims of Syria's war (12 ...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
16 Mar 2013

A boy walks through what once was the market in Azaz, Syria. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.