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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 2
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Zinnahtul Islam, a football player in the Savar team, is one of many local volunteer rescue workers. He is holding the photo of a woman he rescued.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 1
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

One year after the tragedy, the rubbles of the Rana Plaza building are still there. Dusty pieces of jeans and flowery cloth, strewn across the remnants of what used to be ceilings and floors. Street kids roam around the rubbles searching for pieces of iron and other things they can sell.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 3
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Rehanna, who used to work in Rana Plaza, lost one of her legs in the accident.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 4
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein, who worked on the fourth floor of the Rana Plaza, remembers falling and feeling an incredible pain. Then, everything went black. After having been unconscious for 11 days, he woke up with his both legs missing.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 5
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Rehanna, who had one of her legs amputated, is now getting accustomed to walking with her artificial leg at a physiotherapy clinic in Savar. 9 year-old Monira lives in the room next to her – her father also lost one of his legs in the accident.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 6
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

The location where the eight-story building Rana Plaza once stood.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 7
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

Nurjahan Begum had two daughters working in Rana Plaza. The youngest, is alive – the other one is still missing.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 8
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

One year after the Rana Plaza collapsed, people are still digging through the rubble.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 9
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

Signs saying "Rana Plaza, Tazreen – Never Again", on the site where Rana Plaza used to be.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 10
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein, who worked on the fourth floor of the Rana Plaza, remembers falling and feeling an incredible pain. Then, everything went black. When he regained consciousness eleven days later, both of his legs were missing. He's now trying his new prosthetic legs for the first time.

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Rana Plaza and the long recovery 11
By Karim Mostafa
17 Apr 2014

Hasina used to work on the 6th floor of Rana Plaza. The building's four upper floors had been constructed illegally. It was built without observing proper building codes and laws, and using poor materials. Hasina's arm was hurt when the building collapsed. She neither can nor want to go back to "the garments".

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 12
By Karim Mostafa
17 Apr 2014

Shilpy says the employees didn't want to enter the building on the morning the building collapsed – they had seen the cracks. But the management told them it was safe, and said that if they didn't work, they salary wouldn't be paid. She is now staying at a rehabilitation clinic, getting accustomed to her new artificial leg.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 13
By Karim Mostafa
17 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein lost both his legs in the Rana Plaza accident. He's now trying his new legs for the first time. "I feel strange, like I'm floating. Not connected to the ground. But God gave me my life back."

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 14
By Karim Mostafa
16 Apr 2014

Younus Ali and his daughter. The man had never heard of Rana Plaza until the morning of April 24, 2013. He was visiting a nephew in Savar when he heard the sound of the building collapsing. He ran to building and joined local rescuers who were the first on the site. He saved three people before being hit unconscious. Today, he cannot move the lower part of his body.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 15
By Karim Mostafa
15 Mar 2014

In a small alley, not far from the hospital where victims were brought, survivors have a chance at a better future. A small factory was opened by two volunteer rescuers. Profits are divided between the employees.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 16
By Karim Mostafa
15 Mar 2014

In a small alley, not far from the hospital where victims were brought, survivors have a chance at a better future. A small factory was opened by two volunteer rescuers. Profits are divided between the employees.

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Tawergha Houses Looted (3-24)
Tawergha, Misrata, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
26 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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A Destroyed Misrata (18-24)
Tripoli, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
24 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Wounded Prisoner (21-24)
Misrata, Libyen
By Karim Mostafa
23 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Detained Milad Mohammad Yousef From T...
Misrata, Libyen
By Karim Mostafa
23 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Refugee Mizna Muhammad And Daughter (...
Bengahzi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
21 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Intisar Mohammad Camp Security (16-24)
Benghazi ,Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Mother And Child In Camp (17-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Children Going To Class (14-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Lonely Boy (15-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Camp School (12-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Children In School (13-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Camp Street View (8-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? Th Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Children In Refugee Camp (9-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

The kids are passing their days in th...
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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View From Refugee Camp (7-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.