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Keamari: Karachi deep blue sea
Karachi
By NSK
24 Apr 2016

Keamari is the main coastal area of Karachi, comprising the western parts of the city, including the Port of Karachi with an extensive coastline of sandy beaches, small islands and Mangrove forests. ‪

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Yemenis, Foreigners Flee Aden by Sea
Main Street, Aden,Yemen
By Amged Sabeeh
21 Apr 2015

April 21, 2015
Aden, Yemen

Dozens of Yemenis and foreigners are seen in this video, filmed at a seaport in Aden, preparing to travel in small boats to Djibouti or Somalia. According to local sources, around 400 people are fleeing through the port of Aden every day. Most of them travel illegally to east Africa.

The trip to Somalia costs 50 US dollars per person and takes about 16 hours, while it costs 90 dollars per person to reach Djibouti, in a trip that takes about 12 hours by sea.

SHOTLIST

Various of boats near the dock
Various of Aden port entrance
Various of passengers and militiamen inside the seaport
Wide of travellers waiting in seaport parking lot
Traveling of boat carrying passengers
Various of people embarking on boat hoisting Yemeni and Djiboutian flags
Interview with Yemeni man fleeing to Djibouti

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Yemeni Fleeing Aden
01:56

“In the name of God, I am one of the people who have been affected by this war – the aggression by Houthi and his aides, who have bombed our homes. We are unarmed people and now we are homeless. We have become refugees in our homeland.”

02:10
“We were forced to flee to Djibouti. We do not want to leave our country, but we do not have homes any more. We are suffering a lot because of the invasion by [Abdul Malik] Houthi, who does not fear God. He has no mercy for women or children. As you can see, many people are fleeing. Their homes have been destroyed. Children have become homeless.”

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ISIS Checkpoints in Libyan Port
Derna, Libya
By MENA Desk
15 Mar 2015

Fighters affiliated to ISIS have set up checkpoints on Sunday 15 March both within and at the entrances of the eastern Libyan port of Derna. According to eyewitnesses, each checkpoint is manned by 10-15 fighters equipped with Kalashnikov rifles and hand grenades, as well as 4x4 vehicles with mounted anti-aircraft machine guns. Different groups of fighters take shifts in guarding the checkpoints for specific periods of time. The head of the sentries is equipped with a walkie-talkie. The fighters confiscate any liquor and tobacco they find and destroy it on the spot. People deemed guilty of violating Islamic law are taken to the offices of the Islamic police inside the city. When aircraft are spotted flying overhead the fighters disperse, fearing their checkpoints might be targeted.

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Lebanese Fisherman Battle Pollution a...
Sidon, Beirut, Lebanon
By David Shaw
30 Jun 2014

July, 2014
Lebanon

Lebanon's coastline has been a vital part of sustaining lives for thousands of years. However, in recent years, it has become unproductive as a means of subsistence due to privatization and pollution. Local fishermen of many different religions and backgrounds still attempt to scrape a living despite the depleted fish sources and pressure to move away by big business and government.

The Daliyeh, one of the last public spaces left in Beirut, contains the Daliyeh Marina, a small but fully working fishing port which provides a work base for an estimated 60-70 fisherman. The marina is under serious threat of permanent destruction due a hotel project that is due to be built on the Daliyeh rock. The project is funded by the Hariri family, one of the most economically and politically powerful families in Lebanon. The hotel would result in a significant loss to the fishermen and their families who have been working in this area their whole lives. The proposed project would also destroy one of the last places that the local Lebanese can use as a beach for leisure.

The loss of the marina isn't the only pressing issue that is affecting the livelihoods of these men and the families they support. Most of Lebanon's solid waste is deposited in landfills which border the coast, slowly leaking pollution into the ocean. Many fishermen admit that they sometimes purposely salvage large pieces of metal to sell as scrap. The sewers also deposit straight into the Mediterranean, usually completely untreated and containing industrial waste from factories.

Perhaps one of the biggest problems is overfishing. The use of illegal nets, which are used even during the spawning seasons, are having a devastating effect on the fish population, threatening to put many fisherman out of work. Each fishing community seems to have a different viewpoint on managing overfishing in Lebanon; any rules in place are not strictly enforced. Illegal fishing is a product of desperation due to the hardship these fishermen are facing as they continue to work in what appears to be a doomed profession. They often earn as little as $30 US Dollars a day which means that what they catch is often what they and their families eat. Many of the fishermen have no training or skills in any other potential occupation, so they will press on despite the many problems they face. “Fishing is all I know”, Says Hamzi Khalil, 63, “We fish, we eat. We don’t fish – we don’t eat.”

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 21
Florida, Montevideo 11100, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
28 Jan 2014

Two men talk through a window at Bar Iberia in Montevideo. 50 years ago Russian and Polish sailors returning from fishing squid and sunfish in the South Atlantic popularized the bar, leaving behind their stories of the sea. Now "Iberia" remains a place where locals talk politics and football all the time, among them trade unionists, activists, workers and sailors. Wine, beer, empanadas and socialism.

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I am 220
Trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Number 220 gets a disposable camera to take photos of life inside the refugee camp. All refugees get a number upon arrival in Trapani. Photo by: Berta Banacloche

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
The sun sets over the old gym that now serves as a refugee camp.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
A refugee lays on one of the mattresses in the old gym that now serves as a refugee camp. Days are filled with idle time for most refugees.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
Nigerian refugees flock together on the patio of the old gym that now serves as a refugee camp.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
Refugees pass time sitting on the patio of the old gym that is now their home. They are allowed out about three hours per day, the rest of the time they spend inside.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
A refugee scavenges the garbage for valuables. Most of them left Libya in small fishing boats without much space for possessions.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
A refugee lays on his mattress in the old gym that now serves as a refugee camp.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
Dinner through the eyes of refugee no. 220.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
Days are filled with idle time for the refugees who now live in an old gym.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
View through the door of the gym that now serves as the new home of refugee no. 220

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I am 220
Trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
A refugee walks through the old gym that now serves as a refugee camp.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
15 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
The floor of the gym, that now serves as a refugee camp, is covered in mattresses.

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I am 220: Surviving a Migrant Boat Di...
Trapani, Italy
By Transterra Editor
11 Oct 2013

October 15, 2013
Trapani, Italy

"I am 27 years old, originally I came from Nigeria. I crossed from Libya to Italy in a small boat. 105 people went with me and 103 of them survived," said Refugee 220.

In Sicily I stumbled upon a fenced camp in the harbor town of Trapani. At this camp I met number 220. He is one of about 800 people who crossed over from Africa to Italy in the last three weeks. After the tragedy of the third of October, the sea has become a human cemetery. Number 220 is one of the lucky ones. He made it to land.

Number 220 says he was living in Libya, but the situation there drove him to attempt the crossing. He survived, but two women on his small boat died before a commercial ship took them on board. Eventually they ended up in an old gym in Trapani. He spends his days here with 85 other young men. ‘This is already better than Libya, I feel safe here and don’t hear gunshots anymore.’

The men in the gym have no idea what will happen to them. They don’t speak a word of Italian and the guards of the camp don’t speak English. They are totally in the dark about their status and tell me I am the first person to speak English to them since they arrived.

Since the guards don’t give me any information either, and won’t let me enter the camp, number 220 and me decide to meet outside the camp. Here I give him a disposable camera, so he can show me his life inside the camp. ‘I don’t do much inside, mainly sleep and sit on the patio with other guys from Nigeria. And wait.’

The quality of these analogue photos is not the best. Number 220 is not a professional photographer. But in my opinion his slightly dark, bleakly colored and out of focus photos perfectly reflect 220’s life at the moment. He lives on the edge of our society. His name is Louis. He could be a friend.

Photos and Text By:
Berta Banacloche / Jeffry Ruigendijk / Refugee 220

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
11 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
The scarce possessions of the refugees are laid out on their mattresses. Approx. 85 refugees live in this gym at the moment.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
11 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
Refugees pass time on their mattresses inside the old gym that now serves as a refugee camp.

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I am 220
Trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
11 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
The basket now serves as a drying rack for refugees in an old gym in Trapani.

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I am 220
trapani, italy
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
11 Oct 2013

Photo by: Refugee 220
View from the patio, through the eyes of refugee no. 220.

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A fisherman stares at his fisherboat. A port has been destroyed by the tsunami and a prospect that fishing reopens is not yet in sight. Yuriage, Miyagi, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Ultras protest in Tahrir for justice
Cairo
By elking.ecw
18 Jan 2013

Hardcore football fans (known as Ultras) of Ahly football club marched on Friday 18th January to call for justice for their fallen comrades who were killed in a post-match riot with the host fans of Al Masry club. More than 70 supporter were killed with many accusations pointed at police for either being involved or not preventing the riot. The protest which was attended by thousands comes a week before the verdict is issued against the ones accused in the riots.

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Port Gabtoli (5 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (4 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (3 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (2 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (1 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (7 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By U.S. Editor
05 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Libya (17 of 40)
Benghazi, Libya
By George Henton
24 May 2011

Crowds wait to board a passenger ferry leaving from Benghazi, Libya, to the besieged eastern Libyan city of Misrata, 23 May 2011. Despite the large numbers of people attempting to return to Misrata, at the time forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi continue to surround the city with the only open entry point via sea routes from Benghazi and Cyprus. GEORGE HENTON.

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Libya (3 of 40)
Benghazi, Libya
By George Henton
24 May 2011

A migrant family from West Africa waits at the port in Benghazi, Libya, for a bus to take them across the border into Egypt, having just disembarked from a boat sailing from the Libyan city of Misrata, 23 May 2011. Thousands of migrant workers and their families have been forced to flee to neighbouring countries as a result of the fighting in Libya. GEORGE HENTON.

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Libyan refugees arriving in the port ...
Taranto, Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

Taranto (Puglia region), Italy
The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows a Libyan refugee emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.

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Libyan refugees arriving in the port ...
Taranto, Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

Taranto (Puglia region), Italy
The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows a Libyan refugee emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.

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Libyan refugees arriving in th eport ...
Taranto, south Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows a Libyan refugee emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.

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Libyan refugees arriving in the port ...
Taranto, Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows a Libyan refugee emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.

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Libyan refugees arriving in the port ...
Taranto, Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows Libyan refugees emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.

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Libyan refugees arriving in the port ...
Taranto, Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows Libyan refugees emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.

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Libyan refugees arriving in the port ...
Taranto, Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows a Libyan refugee emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.