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Israel Border Police
West Bank
By Ralf Falbe
09 May 2015

Israel Border Police in the West Bank, May 9, 2015.

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Easter Celebration in conflict Zone I...
Kramatorsk, Ukraine
By Andrey Samerkhanov
14 Apr 2015

Liberated Kramatorsk residents celebrate Easter during an open air event.
Kramatorsk is still in the conflict zone in Ukraine and just to remind the city was heavily shelled with Russian MRLS BM9K58 Tornado by Russian mercenaries just two month ago during another day (on Feb 10 2015).
More materials: http://empr.media/news/kramatorsk-shelled-with-russian-missiles-1-civilian-killed-6-wounded
http://empr.media/video/conflict-zone/shelling-of-kramatorsk-by-russian-tornado-missiles
http://empr.media/video/conflict-zone/kramatorsk-shelled-by-russian-tornado-missiles
http://empr.media/video/conflict-zone/unexploded-russian-tornado-missile-at-kids-playground-in-kramatorsk
https://youtu.be/SFFFL36NKb4
Young and old people now are tired from warfare during a year of Russian military invasion into Ukraine and are glad to celebrate the spring coming.
Full English description and sound bites translation will be provided after request.

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Easter presents from volunteers for U...
Kramatorsk
By Andrey Samerkhanov
12 Apr 2015

Ukrainian volunteers bring homemade made Easter presents to Ukrainian border guards in Kramatorsk.

Full English description and sound bites translation will be provided after request.

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 01
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

Former Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen here with his 14 year old son Hussein, training in Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 02
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 04
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 05
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 11
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 07
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 08
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, (left) Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 06
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 10
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 09
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein (center) and 16-year old Ali (standing, center), son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 14
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 12
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 13
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 16
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Rise in the Manufacturing of Military...
baghdad
By Reda Kareem
09 Jul 2014

لم نعمل هكذا منذ ايام حرب ايران (الحرب العراقية الايرانية)، يقول ابو محمد، الرجل الذي يبلغ من العمر نحو ستين عاما، والذي يعمل في خياطة الملابس العسكرية منذ اكثر من خمسة واربعين سنة. "نحن الان نخيط من خمسة وثلاثين الى اربعين بدلة عسكرية يوما، كنا نخيط ثلاثة فقط في الايام العادية"، يضيف الرجل بنبرة اعتزاز ”أعتبر هذا جزءا من الالتزام بفتوى الجهاد التي اعلنها المرجع الاعلى"، في اشارة الى المرجع الشيعي علي السيستاني، وفتواه بـ"الجهاد الكفائي"، التي اطلقها بعد اجتياح مسلحين سنة لاغلب اجزاء محافظتي نينوى وصلاح الدين، واجزاء كبيرة من الانبار، والاطراف الغربية من ديالى، والشرقية من كركوك، لكن لايبدو ان الجانب الديني هو وحده الذي يجعل ابا محمد متحمسا هكذا. "كان سعر البدلة الواحدة ستين الف دينار (نحو 40 دولارا)، لكنه الان اصبح ثمانين الفا (60 دولارا)"، يتابع ابو محمد "تجار القماش هم اصل البلاء، فانا لم ارفع سعر اجرة عملي، لكنهم رفعوا سعر المتر من القماش العسكري ثلاثة اضعاف، بعد ان كان باربعة دولارات، هو الان باثني عشر دولارا". وبحسبة بسيطة، فان ابا محمد يجني اكثر من تسعمائة دولار يوميا، وهو مبلغ مرتفع بالنسبة لارباح يومية في العراق، "اشغل ستة عاملين، وادفع اجور الكهرباء المرتفعة، واتحمل تهديدات من مسلحين"، يقول ابو محمد مبررا. وقد يكون الجزء الاخير صحيحا، اذ قام مسلحون مجهولون يوم الاربعاء 25 حزيران، بتفجير محلات تعمل بخياطة البدلات العسكرية، في منطقة الباب الشرقي، وسط بغداد، وهي منطقة قريبة لمنطقة علاوي الحلة التي يعمل بها ابو محمد، لكن هذا لايبدو كافيا لجعل ابا محمد واصحاب نحو 15 عشر معمل خياطة في المنطقة التي يعمل بها، يرفعون اعينهم من على مكائن الخياطة، التي يعملون عليها من الصباح وحتى ساعة متاخرة ليلا. ويقول الرجل الستيني "نحن نخيط البدلات لمختلف صنوف القوات المسلحة، الصحرواي لقوات الجيش العادية، والازرق بتدرجاته لقوات الشرطة والشرطة الاتحادية، والاسود للقوات الخاصة"، لكن البدلة التي كان يخيطها في يده كانت باللون الاخضر المرقط "انها للمتطوعين، وتشكل مبيعاتها نحو 95 بالمائة من مبيعاتنا". يؤكد ابو محمد انه يطلب هوية تعريف قبل بيع بدلات الضباط، او رتبهم العسكرية، لكن باقي البدلات تباع بدون هويات "لاتوجد ضمانات من تسربها الى الميليشيات او المسلحين"، يقول ابو محمد، لكنه يستدرك "نحاول ان نسالهم عن وحداتهم او اية معلومات اخرى". الضابط في الجيش السابق، والمحلل الامني، عدنان نعمة سلمان، يحذر من ان "الميليشيات والقاعدة شنوا هجمات كثيرة بازياء الجيش العراقي التي استعملوها للتمويه وضمان عدم المقاومة في المناطق التي تسيطر عليها الحكومة". ويلفت سلمان ايضا الى ان "اعداد المتطوعين الكبيرة قد تكون عبئا على الجيش"، مبينا ان "في فترة الحرب العراقية الايرانية كان الجندي من الجيش الشعبي يحتاج الى ثلاثة جنود نظاميين لحمايته، كما ان حركة المتطوعين بطيئة، والتزامهم قليل"، ويؤكد ان "اعداد المتطوعين الكبيرة لن تؤدي الى حلحلة الاوضاع سريعا". لكن الجندي في القوات الخاصة، حمزة احمد، الذي كان يخيط بدلة له هو وزميل اخر، يقول ان تطوع الالاف من المواطنين اسهم بعدم انهيار الجيش معنويا، مع انه يعترف “أفضل القتال برفقة جندي نظامي واحد، على القتال مع خمسة متطوعين”. ويؤكد احمد ان "المتطوعين لم ينشروا في الاماكن الحساسة، او الوحدات الخاصة، وان دورهم اقتصر على اسناد فرق والوية المشاة الخفيفة"، فيما تحدث زميله الذي رفض كشف اسمه عن "ازمة طعام بدأت معسكرات التدريب في الجيش العراقي تعاني منها، بسبب الاعداد الهائلة للمتطوعين". ويقول الجندي في القوات الخاصة "ذهبنا الى معسكر تدريب التاجي، وجدنا حشودا من المتطوعين تتجمع حول فرن للصمون (الخبز العراقي)، الكثير منهم مدوا ايديهم الى داخل الفرن قبل ان ينضج الخبز، وتحملوا الاكتواء بالنار بسبب الجوع". خياط اخر في هذا السوق، المعروف بسوق الزرملي، يشهد عمله ازدهارا ايضا بسبب هذه الاوضاع، حازم الشويلي يعمل بخياطة الاعلام العشائرية واعلام الوحدات العسكرية بالاضافة طبعا الى العلم العراقي، ومن غير ان يدري، تبين الاحصاءات التي يطرحها حازم، مايبدو تغيرا في المزاج العام العراقي. "قبل الاحداث كانت مبيعات العلم العراقي مزدهرة، كان دائما المكون الثابت في اي قائمة مبيعات"، ويوضح "قادة الجيش مثلا كانوا يطلبون العلم العراقي بحجم كبير، ثم راية وحداتهم ورمزها بحجم اصغر قليلا، والشيوخ القبليون كانوا يخيطون العلم العراقي باحجام كبيرة، ويخيطون معها رايات تمثل رموز قبائلهم والوانها، قبيلتي الشويلات مثلا"، يبين حازم، "يكون لون رايتهم احمرا، وعليها نجمة وهلال، مشابهة تقريبا للعلم التركي". يؤكد حازم "بعد الاحداث قلت مبيعات العلم العراقي، نحن الان نبيع الاعلام العشائرية بكميات كبيرة واحجام لم نكن نصنع منها قبلا"، بينما يحرص القادة، يستدرك حازم بابتسامة، على شراء رايات وحداتهم، ومن قماش يتحمل المعارك ويكون ظاهرا لدى التصوير في التلفاز. ويتابع، في هذه الاوقات تتجول كاميرات التلفاز الرسمي على مضافات الشيوخ في المناطق الجنوبية، وكلهم يريد تبيان التزامه بفتوى السيستاني، ويحرص على ان تكون رايات عشيرته اكبر من غيرها في التجمعات والاهازيج التي تحتوي على اكثر من عشيرة، مضيفا، حتى العشيرة الواحدة بدات بيوتاتها بانتاج رايات مستقلة، تقوم برفعها في هذه التجمعات. فاروق بابان، وهو محلل سياسي، يفسر هذه الحالة بانها "بيان على ضعف الدولة"، موضحا، ان "شيوخ العشائر يعتاشون على عطايا الدولة، والحكومة الحالية توفر لهم الكثير من الدعم، لهذا فهم حريصون على ابراز ولائهم لها، كما ان للاقتتال المذهبي دورا كبيرا في تغذية النعرات القبلية". ويلفت بابان، الذي يبلغ الستين من العمر، الى خطورة هذا الامر، مؤكدا ان "الوطنية التي كانت الصفة الاسمى لدى جيلنا، اضحت مثارا للسخرية لدى الكثيرين من الشباب حاليا، في حين ازدهرت القيم العشائرية، والانتماءات الدينية اللتين تشظتا الى درجة ان مؤيدي رجل دين من مذهب ما، يقتتلون مع مؤيدي رجل دين اخر من نفس المذهب، ويقتتل ابناء العشيرة الواحدة احيانا، على خلافات بين افخاذها، قد تصل من التفاهة الى موضوع رعي بقرة فرد من العشيرة في مرعى يعود لفرد اخر من العشيرة ذاتها، لكن من فخذ مختلف". لكن المؤرخ صالح الخضيري له رأي اخر، اذ يقول ان "السكان يلجأون في فترات ضعف القانون الى الانتماءات الفرعية، مثل الدين والمذهب والقبيلة، من اجل البقاء ضمن محيط يحميهم، مع انه يفرض عليهم الكثير من القيود". ويتابع الخضيري، وهو عضو اتحاد المؤرخين العرب وعالم بالانساب معتمد من قبل الجامعة العربية ان "التاريخ يشير بوضوح الى ان السكان يميلون الى الانقسام الى كانتونات او مكونات اصغر في فترة تشظي الدولة او ضعفها"، مبينا "بغداد انقسمت ايام غزو المغول الى احياء سنية واخرى شيعية، كانت تقتتل بينها دائما، وللاسف يبدو ان ساسة العراق لايقرأون التاريخ، اللذي يقول ان الخراب ينتظر المجتمعات التي لاتزدهر فيها سلطة القانون، والعدل، والنظام".

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North Korea in Color 017
By Ulrik Pedersen
06 Jun 2014

A couple's marriage photoshoot in rural Hamhung.

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North Korea in Black and White 014
By Ulrik Pedersen
05 Jun 2014

school children walking up the stairs of the Russian inspired metro station. Pyongyang, North Korea.

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North Korea in Black and White 017
By Ulrik Pedersen
05 Jun 2014

High school students walking together in Pyongyang. Pyongyang, North Korea.

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North Korea in Color 021
By Ulrik Pedersen
05 Jun 2014

A newlywed couple have a marriage photo shoot at the new war museum in Pyongyang.

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Gendarmerie
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

A police officer observing villagers protesting against Chevron's fracking activities in the area. Pungesti is one of the poorest villages in Romania but its people have been standing up against the US giant corporation Chevron for months.

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
26 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art bei Sener Ozmen. © Claudia Wiens

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IN THE EYES OF THE LAW
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
30 Aug 2012

A Cambodian police officer observes his colleagues as they evict unwilling residents.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

Thumb sm
EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

Thumb sm
EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

Thumb sm
EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

Thumb sm
EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.