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The Woman with 100 Dogs
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
16 Mar 2015

Over fifteen years ago, Edina Prado, 70, adopted two stray dogs at the local college where she taught history. Little did she know how that day would affect her future. Over these fifteen years, her and her husband, Euracy Prado, 80, continued adopting stray dogs off the street. Today they have over 110 dogs at home, although they admit they’ve lost count. Despite bringing her waves of endless chores, she credits them for helping her overcome depression. The fact that they go though nearly a half-ton of dog food each month (400kg/880lbs) doesn’t deter them from trying to find homes for as many stray dogs as they can.

“What is our purpose on Earth?” she asked. “Some people take care of other people, I take care of dogs”. She added before finishing, “We should leave the world a better place than we found it.”

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100 Dogs 01
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, prepares to feed her two akitas. The akitas are only two of her more than 100 dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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100 Dogs 02
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, locking out two of his small dogs from the kitchen. Prado and his wife care for over 100 dogs in their home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 03
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreria Prado, 70, with four of her dogs. Prado and her husband care for over 100 dogs in their home in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 04
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreria Prado, 70, moves through her kitchen, careful not to step on any of her dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 05
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80 (center) with his wife Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, as they clean up after their dogs. They adopted their first two dogs 15 years ago. Ever since, Mrs. Prado slowly began adopting abandodned dogs from their neighborhood. Today they estimate thay have at least 100 dogs at home. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 06
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, shoos some of her many dogs with a broom. While the presence of so many dogs in such a small space gives off a feeling of chaos, Prado says the dogs are ultimately quite well behaved. Moments of fighting and aggression are outweighed by generally cooperative and playful behavior.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2016.

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100 Dogs 07
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferreria Prado, 70, in her backyard calling for her dogs in a kennel. Prado and her husband estimate they have between 110 and 120 dogs at home. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 08
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, (center) greets some of her many dogs in her backyard. She credits her dogs with helping her overcome depression. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 09
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, cares for a sick dog in her backyard. Medical costs, including having the dogs spayed and neutered, are some of the main expenses involved in taking care of the dogs. Some of the expenses are covered by the couple's pension, while others are covered by donations.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2016.

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100 Dogs 10
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, followed by some of her over 100 dogs as she cleans up after them. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2016.

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100 Dogs 11
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, plays with some of his dogs in his backyard. Prado says they go through over 400 kg (880 lbs) of dog food per month. Much of the food is donated, while the rest of it, along with other expenses are covered by the couple's pensions. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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100 Dogs 12
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

A dogs world in Edina Ferreira Prado's backyard. Her and her husband take it upon themselves to adopt stray animals from their community. In all, they have over 100 dogs at home. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2016.

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100 Dogs 13
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, (center) inspect a puppy that is about to be adopted for ticks and diseases. She
also screens the owners to ensure they will treat the animals well. The organizationshe volunteers for, Resgate de Animais, even visits people's homes to double check that the adopting owners are not somehow harmful to the dogs.
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015.

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100 Dogs 14
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, (center) looks on as his wife, Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, picks off a tick from a puppy that is about to be adopted. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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100 Dogs 15
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, nearly in tears as she gives a puppy away for adoption. Prado said she always fears new owners will mistreat them.

While Prado initially intended to keep the dogs she shelters, their numbers have grown so large that she puts many of them up for adoption. Every Saturday she takes around 10-15 of her dogs to an event to have them adopted. She tries to only give away dogs who have stayed with her for a short time.
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015

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100 Dogs 16
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

One of Edina Ferreira Prado's many dogs clamors for attention. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015.

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100 Dogs 17
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, removes ticks from one of her many dogs. Prado expressed frustatrion that people don't spay and neuter their dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015

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100 Dogs 18
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Euracy Aguiar Prado, 80, and his wife, Edina Ferreira Prado, 70, walk though a hall in their home. "What is our purpose on Earth?" Mrs. Prado asked. To leave it better than we found it. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-16-2015.

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100 Dogs 19
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Antonio Franco
15 Mar 2015

Edina Ferriera Prado, 70, in her yard and with some of her over 100 dogs. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 03-15-2015.

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Vets rush to save burned animals afte...
Chile, Valparaíso
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 Apr 2014

IVs in their snouts, bandages on their paws, a surgeon’s hand on their hearts – the port city dogs and cats of Valparaíso, Chile have not been forgotten in the outpouring of community support following the fire that destroyed 2,500 homes this weekend.

A makeshift animal hospital is one many centers sent up throughout the bright, graffiti-covered coastal city of Valparaíso, Chile. Victims of the fire who lost their homes are now either living in the dormitory-style shelters or in tents on top of the ashes of their former homes. Although the government estimates only 15 deaths from the disaster, more than 11,000 have been left homeless.

The fire came only two weeks following an earthquake in north of the country, where many of the volunteers at the animal hospital had been only days earlier.

Fundación Stuka, an organization founded to aid the thousands of animals injured in the massive Chilean earthquake in 2010, was one of the core suppliers of vets and medicine to the makeshift animal hospital.

"The majority of the animals came running out the hills [that were on fire] by themselves," said Fernanda Solari, the foundation's organizing director. "But a lot of our work was in situ care on with owners who did not want to abandon their dogs as they fled their houses."

Lucas Gacés, a young student veterinarian provided emergency care at the shelter for several days.

"We're seeing a lot of burns, and a lot of animals whose house fell down on top of them,” Garcés said. "Most of the animals have burns over 80 to 90% of their bodies."

While many of the pets were brought in by owners, the small entrance to the emergency veterinary shelter was largely crowded by strangers bringing in wounded animals that they found in the streets.

Many of those who brought animals stayed, volunteering to embrace wounded animals on the floors of the cages where they slept.

For the pets who have not been reclaimed by their owners, local animal lovers have lined up to adopt them. Leo and Ana Molina, a local couple, had been at the shelter every day since the fire broke out caring for animals.

“I have 30 dogs, all of which I’ve taken in from the street,” Ana said. “But I’m taking three of them [from the shelter] home with me today.”

Shelters for people who have been affected have also sprung up all over the city, servicing thousands of people, many whom lost everything in the fire – but those volunteering at the animal shelter noted how important it was to reach out to animals as well.

“There are people who help other people,” Leo said. “But we also need to worry about the the other souls in the world – animals.”

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PHOTOSTORY: Vets rush to save burned ...
By Zachary F. Volkert
14 Apr 2014

While many of the pets were brought in by owners, the small entrance to the emergency veterinary shelter was largely crowded by strangers bringing in wounded animals that they found in the streets.

Here, a dog waits for surgery on its burnt tail and paws.

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Heroes For The Strays (20 of 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
14 May 2013

Mak Intan is talking to the dog who save her life when she drowned at the nearby river

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Heroes for the Strays (4 0f 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
13 Apr 2013

-Villagers donate food to Pakmie. A close friend gives fish heads to feed the stray animals.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (9 0f 30)
Alor star, Malaysia
By syahrin
12 Apr 2013

-One of Pak Mie dogs in the shelter who previously suffered from mange.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan, have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes For The Strays (29 of 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
15 Mar 2013

Mak Intan is checking on one of the dogs who have save her from drowning at the near by river

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Heroes For The Strays (18 of 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
14 Mar 2013

Pak Mie plays with his rotweiller who paralyze half of his mouth from the beatings from the human

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Heroes For The Strays (15 of 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
14 Mar 2013

Mak Intan carries her dog in her car to give medicines