Thumb sm
The beach of Sao Condrado
Rochina, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
By Anna Karatvuo
31 Mar 2012

Beach of Sao Conrado lays in the south zone of Rio de Janeiro. It is the closest beach from Brazil's largest favela, Rochina. In Rio there are about 1000 slum areas like that and more than 1.2 million people live in them. For them beach of Sao Conrado is the only place to get away from the hustle. It's a place to play, swim and forget all the worries for a moment.

Thumb sm
A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Feb 2012

Kreet loves to do his work on his own. He makes sure to brush his teeth before he sleeps.

Thumb sm
Lonely Boy (15-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

Thumb sm
Business is business
Cairo, Egypt
By cbrog
24 Nov 2011

In the street Mohammed Mahmoud, after the end of the confrontations between police and demonstrators, this young man sells some Cotton candy.

Mohammed Mahmoud Street
Cairo - Egypt
11/24/2011

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 01
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

While dancing, Mugat wedding attendees put money in each other's headdresses. The money is meant to symbolize wealth. The tradition is an adaptation of a local Uzbek custom of throwing money at the dancers as a gift and allowing the children to collect the money. However, the Mugat are cautious of thieves and prefer to put the money directly into another person's headdress.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 02
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Guests also brings presents to the boy who is being circumcised. The gifts can be clothes, toys or just money.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 03
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

The 9 year old boy who will be circumcised. The age of circumcision varies, but is usually performed before the boy hits puberty. The primary determining factor is the family's ability to gather money for the ceremony. Mugat tradition forbids photographing of the actual circumcision.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 04
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Cars parked in front of the place of ceremony. Mugat are known for driving old Soviet cars, like those pictured here.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 05
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

However, the poverty of Mugat society means that most cannot afford cars and many still use donkeys.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 07
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Mugat children, including the boy to be circumcised stand in front of a Soviet era monument to fallen soldiers.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 06
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Relatives of the boy to be circumcized arriving at the ceremony

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 07
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

The boy's parents have to arrange the help of all of their relatives and friends in order to help feed the approximately 200 guests.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 08
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Photos of dead relatives are placed above a carpet depicting the Kabaa in Mecca. This is done as a sign of respect to the dead relatives.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 09
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Twin sisters. Their parents rented dresses for them for the ceremony.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 11
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Mugat love to decorate their houses with cheap Chinese landscape pictures.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 12
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Chickens and watermelons are very cheap and a common staple of any meal in Uzbekistan

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 14
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

According to tradition, every family at the ceremony will receive a dish full of fresh meat and a bottle of vodka. Despite the fact that the Mugat are Muslims, alcohol, and especially vodka is an accepted legacy of heavy Russian influence in the region.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 15
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Fresh meat and vodka are very desirable products for Mugat, symbolizing prosperity. Guests will take this meat home.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 17
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Like Roma gypsies, gold teeth are common fashion for the Mugat. The gun pictured in this photo is a toy gun intended as a gift for the boy being circumcised. Guns are strictly forbidden in Uzbekistan.

Thumb sm
Mugat Circumcision Ceremony 18
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
12 Sep 2011

Teenage Mugat girls enjoy their time at the ceremony. Most ethnologists believe the Mugat have Indian origins, causing many to draw parallels between the Mugat and the Roma gypsies of Europe. The comparison is not based solely on ethnicity, but also on lifestyle. The Mugat, like the Roma Gypsies, live on the fringes of society and have strong and insular communities.

Thumb sm
Somali Boy
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By MediaMikeDC
07 Mar 2011

A young boy on the streets of Hargeisa, Somaliland.

Thumb sm
Soccer
Tindouf, Southwest Algeria
By Docphot
04 Jan 2011

Soccer is popular in the camps, most follow Spanish teams such as FC Barcelona or Real Madrid.

Thumb sm
Cambodian Acid Attack Survivors (10 o...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
05 Jan 2010

Dep Da and his mother were doused with 3 liters of acid by their neighbors because of disputes in 2002. Dep Da's mother Long Cha Toul died, Dep Da received severe burns and has suffered from epilepsy since the incident.

Thumb sm
Dervishes of Prizren 02
Prizren, Kosovo
By Michele Pero
19 Apr 2009

Prizren, Kosovo. Rufaì sekt. Fakir dervishes celebrating the Newroz (Nevruz), the beginning of the new year with fakirism rituals. A young dervish with his piercing, proudly shown. The pin is a symbol of courage and the piercing demonstrated that the dervishes are brave.

Thumb sm
Dervishes of Prizren 04
Prizren, Kosovo
By Michele Pero
18 Apr 2009

Prizren, Kosovo. Rufaì sekt. Fakir dervishes celebrating the Newroz (Nevruz), the beginning of the new year with fakirism rituals. The teqe, dervishes listening to the schaik and his family praying and leading the ceremony, women are watching from the gallery.

Thumb sm
Dervishes of Prizren 05
Prizren, Kosovo
By Michele Pero
18 Apr 2009

Prizren, Kosovo. Rufaì sekt. Fakir dervishes celebrating the Newroz (Nevruz), the beginning of the new year with fakirism rituals. The teqe, dervishes are praying and listening to the schaik.

Thumb sm
Dervishes of Prizren 06
Prizren, Kosovo
By Michele Pero
18 Apr 2009

Prizren, Kosovo. Rufaì sekt. Fakir dervishes celebrating the Newroz (Nevruz), the beginning of the new year with fakirism rituals. The schaik and his family praying and leading the ceremony.

Thumb sm
Dervishes of Prizren 09
Prizren, Kosovo
By Michele Pero
18 Apr 2009

Prizren, Kosovo. Rufaì sekt. Fakir dervishes celebrating the Newroz (Nevruz), the beginning of the new year with fakirism rituals. A young dervish taking candies as a sign of hospitality but also as a energy source for the effort of the long ceremony.

Thumb sm
Dervishes of Prizren 12
Prizren, Kosovo
By Michele Pero
18 Apr 2009

Prizren, Kosovo. Rufaì sekt. Fakir dervishes celebrating the Newroz (Nevruz), the beginning of the new year with fakirism rituals.

Thumb sm
Dervishes of Prizren 13
Prizren, Kosovo
By Michele Pero
18 Apr 2009

Prizren, Kosovo. Rufaì sekt. Fakir dervishes celebrating the Newroz (Nevruz), the beginning of the new year with fakirism rituals. Sheikh Xhemali Shehu's nephew.

Thumb sm
The Killing of Channu Mandavi
Dantewada, India
By Javed Iqbal
13 Apr 2009

19 year old Channu Mandavi, a Muria tribal, was gunned down by the police as an alleged left-wing extremist on the 12th of April, 2009.

Thumb sm
Poverty And Tourism In Laos (4 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A barefoot Lao boy plays in a village near Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

Thumb sm
Children in poverty, Cambodia (10 of 20)
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By hiroko tanaka
02 Aug 2008

A Cambodian boy carries a bucket of water from the well by international aid in Floating Village in Tonle Sap Lake, one of areas suffer severe poverty, near Siem Reap.

Thumb sm
The People of Pingelap (23 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
15 Mar 2008

An 11 year-old colorblind boy protects his eyes from the bright sun.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.