Frame 0004
DJI_0203
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
05 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

Frame 0004
DJI_0179
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

Frame 0004
DJI_0175
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

Frame 0004
DJI_0181
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

Frame 0004
Made in China Container Harbor Aerial...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
DJI_0009
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
11 Mar 2018

Hong Kong skyline view seen from Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Shipyard workers pose for the camera in a year near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

A shipyard worker gets prepared to weld near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Two men are hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A boy stops to pose for a photo while playing near a ship recycling yard in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A man is hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

17 year-old Ashraful has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. He breaks down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers to be scrapped. Most of them live by eating rice and vegetables. Ashraful cannot remember when he last ate meat.

Frame 0004
Souk El-Khan in Hasbaya, an Old Style...
Hasbaya, Lebanon
By [email protected]
28 Dec 2014

Hasbaya, Lebanon

December 29, 2014

Souk El-Khan is one of the oldest public markets in Lebanon. Located in between Hasbayya, Arkoub and Marjaayoun, it is attended by the merchants and citizens from the South and the Bekaa. Also, in previous times, in was used by the people of Houla in the South Galilee in Palestine; and Houran and the Golan in Syria for all kinds of dealing and trading. Some of the market’s most common goods were cattle, olives and local farming products like seeds, lemons and bananas. Moreover, the market was used as a pit stop for herds of bulls, camels and donkeys coming from Mount Amel, Safad and Houla regions towards the Bekaa and Syria.

The market was given its name after the great hotel built by Wali Abu Bakr al-Shihabi in 1350. The hotel was built with old stones, lime and white sand, and maintains its traditional feel until now. Every Tuesday, merchants spread their carpets under tents of cloth and display their goods on rocks, wooden boards, or in front of their animals and old cars.

Since 2005, the market has witnessed a series of modernization and sophistication. Through a cultural project funded by USAID along with the implementation of Mercy Corps, which completed a full integrated outline, the market became not only a commercial epicenter but also a station to various cultural, artistic and social activities, a space for recreation in times of holidays and festivals, and a popular destination in the various political events and festivals.

The market occupies more than 30,000 square meters. All along the Hasbani river’s west bank, popular stalls are spread, offering nuts, falafel, and grilled meats to attract the people’s attention. Also found are affordable goods brought by traders from Nabatieh, the South and the Bekaa Valley. Moreover, the market has, since 2006, become the intent of many UNIFIL forces.

Nowadays, the market is cut by a tight road for the cars, around which small shops are present and to its sides tents are mounted to handle the products. There are many alleys and side streets to the market. To the right of the road, between eucalyptus and cypress trees, products like clothes, dresses, carpets, shoes and home utensils are displayed. To the left of the road, all kinds of fruits, vegetables and sweets are displayed. To the south, we find a big market for meats and barbecue products. Also to the south, exists a big animal market used for trading cattle. Additionally, there is a section for plants: fruit trees, forest trees and various flowers. The noises, sounds, discussions and variety of local dialects show the market goer that social interaction plays a major role in the market.

Hasbayya has kept the market within its interest. It has therefore cooperated with foreign funding entities aimed at updating the market’s infrastructure, while preserving its old-fashioned traditions and feel. Consequently, the work was distributed over 8,000 square meters, in addition to the renovation of the Khan over four thousand square meters. The project included the construction of eighty shops roofed with tiles, surrounded with parking lots that fit up to two hundred and fifty cars. Distributed inside are green spaces that hold old trees. In addition, the project holds a slaughterhouse, bathrooms and a multi-purpose exhibition room built of concrete, with a meat market on its roof. This is the heritage of Souk El-Khan. Also, the project includes a public park equipped with seats and amusements for children with ongoing security under the municipality’s supervision.

Shot List

Wide shot of Marjaayoun area
Close up on the sign boards
Various shots of the traffic, the merchants, and the people in the area of the market
Various shots of cattle in the market
Various shots of butchers in the market and people eating meat.

SOUNDBITES

(01:11-02:08)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Al-Khan market is the oldest vegetable market in Lebanon. A bit down from here, there used be a khan [a hotel], where people from many countries used to stay and sell their merchandise on camels and horses.
I am 70 years old now. I used to come here with my father to sell iron tools, for agriculture and so. Until this day, I still come here, I made a family, built a house, bought properties, and my pocket is full, thank God, all because of this market.

(02:32-03:08)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Al-Khan market is located in the center of Marjaayoun area in Hasbayya, it dates from the ottoman times. It is a very ancient market, and as we said, the inhabitants of the area come here to sell their products – grains, cattle, grapes, figs, nuts and almonds, and vegetables.

(03:51-04:07)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

We have been coming here for 20 years. We have to come to the market to trade and sell.
Interviewer: What do you sell?
I sell cattle. I have a butcher shop and I sell cattle.

(04:36-05:06)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

It is a very old market, over 200 years old. Caravans used to arrive here carrying agricultural products, silk, and fabrics. There used to be a khan a bit down from here; it used to be a station for merchants and their cattle. There, they were able rest and then to continue their journey to the south.

(05:18-05:35)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Now it is all about money, you buy something and you pay for it. Before, it used to be a trade system. People brought chickpeas, and took tomatoes in exchange for them, or exchange cabbage for bring tomatoes. Now, this does not take place anymore.

Frame 0004
Shark finning: A Cruel Dish is Disapp...
Hong Kong
By maltekol
30 Jun 2013

The trade in Shark Fins has declined in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong is the world's shark fin capital, where about half of all fins are traded. But according to figures from the Hong Kong government imports last year of Shark fins dropped by a third.

For most Chinese, eating shark's fin still remains a status symbol. But as Malte Kollenberg reports young people are starting to view it differently.

This is how Shark fins are ‘harvested….
The fins are cut off a living shark and then the torso is thrown back into the ocean. Most of these fins from countries like Indonesia end up in Hong Kong.In 2008 around 10.000 tons of fins passed the city’s ports according to environmental organization Oceana.

INTV (English): Stanley Shea, Activist with French founded Bloom Association
“In Hong Kong in the old times they provided banquets which is all settled by the restaurant and the fin is always included in the banquet. So it leaves the customer, they actually have no choice to remove the dishes from the banquet set.”

But things started to change three years ago.
Under pressure from Environmental groups Governments in Hong Kong and Mainland China have stopped serving shark fins at official banquets. And big corporations as well as hotel chains are announcing they will take shark fin soup off their menus.

INTV (English): Stanley Shea, Activist with French founded Bloom Association
“We have been talking to corporate and also hotels and restaurants. And we found in Hong Kong now awareness has been increased and many hotels and restaurants now offer something alternative in the banquet menus so people can choose not to have it.”

According to the World Wildlife Fund, appetite for the fins and other shark-related products has led to some shark species falling in numbers by 60-70%.
But in March this year five more species of Shark were added to the Washington Convention, ensuring endangered species are not threatened by overfishing and trade.This means tradingof eightshark speciesis not possible without official documentation anymore.
Here is the Sheung Wan District …. Shark Fins are still openly being sold.

But small shops merchants say business lately is slow and they are reluctant to talk about shark fins on camera…it has become a sensitive topic.But not far away at restaurant Lin Heung Kui staff will still proudly tell you that shark fin soup is on the menu.

INTV(Cantonese): Unidentified employee in Restaurant
“We prepare and serve the fins in lots of ways - with a clear soup or with shredded chicken. It is definitely more popular at night. We offer an especially cheap deal at $88 at the moment, but sometimes people come to get more expensive dishes.”

Shark fin soup has been the food of the rich and wealthy for hundreds of years in China. Consumption of the fins is said to increase health.

But anthropologist Veronica Mak says generational change is taking place.

INTV (English): Veronica Mak, Anthropologist at the Chinese University of Hong Kong
“Not consuming shark fins becomes a signifier to show you are a social responsible person. In the past people made shark fins a signifier in a banquet, but nowadays this signifier changes.”

Activists believe that awareness and education is the key to change consumer behavior. And less demand for shark fins here will result in fewer sharks left for dead in the world’s oceans.

Video footage of fishermen "harvesting" fins is courtesy of Greenpeace. The footage was licensed from Greenpeace to be included into the video report.

Frame 0004
Today's weapons trade in Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By salem_rizk
14 Jun 2013

Recently, weapon stores that sell and repair arms have been sprouting up in Aleppo, Syria. These stores are opening in rebel held areas in Syria and, due to the lack of regulation, are further destabilizing the fragile security situation. The omnipresence of arbitrary militias in civilian areas is creating discomfort among citizens. Citizens are demanding the Free Syrian Army and Sharia authority find a solution and enact laws that govern the sales of weapons in the area.

Shop owners have stated that most of their clients are rebels. They mention that their weapons supply comes from the Free Syrian Army. Members of the Free Syrian Army often barter their weapons for ammunition. Furthermore, some members of the Assad regime sell their weapons to civilians who then sell them back to the shops. In general, most of the arms that are available in the shops are Russian made.

First interview is with Abu Mohammed a weapons sales man 38 years
Second interview is with Abu Ibrahim, a weapon sales man, 36 years

Third interview is with Abdullah Karmo, a civillian, 33 years

Fourth interview is with Moustapha Amro, a civillian, 22 years

-----Transcription-----

00:30 Are they here?
00:31 Yes, they are.
00:32 How much is this one?
00:33 75 Syrian Pounds.
00:39 Most of my clients are Free Syrian Army soldiers. They gain weapons in the battles and exchange them for bullets because of the lack of ammunition.

Interview 1:
00:56 Regarding civilians, when they ask for weapons, I don't sell to them unless they have a permission slip from Al Sharia authority.
Even if the person is an FSA soldier, I ask about him before I sell him anything, or he needs to give me a paper that states which brigade he fights for.

Interview 2:
01:23 Here, we fix weapons as a service.
01:33 Some thugs sell weapons to civilians. so we get the weapons from them.
01:40: We have all types of Russian weapons, Russian bullets, Russian BKC, we have a variety of Russian weapons.

Interviews 3:
02:32 The city of Aleppo is witnessing a spread of weapons in a chaotic and random way. It's even a bit weird and strange. This is a very bad phenomenon, which is also unethical.
02:43 It's extremely messy, the way weapons are being spread.
02:48 There are many shops that sell weapons now and these shops are not legally organized.
02:54 To be able to control this, we must have a mechanism to monitor the process of selling and buying weapons, with both brigades and sellers.
03:06 Al Sharia authority should have a role in controlling this trade, and establish laws to organize the random spread of weapons.

Interview 4:
03:15 This phenomenon is not good at all, but as long as we are in a war situation, we must have these shops.
03:22 We need them because it helps us. If the army attacks us, we can defend ourselves with these weapons.
03:31 I know it' bad, but we have no other choice. What can we do ?

----- Arabic Description------

انتشرت في الفترة الاخيرة محلات بيع الأسلحة و تصليحها في مدينة حلب وباقي المناطق المحررة وسبّب ذلك حالة فلتان أمني.

و يلاحظ وجود المسلحين في أماكن تواجد المدنين مما خلق حالة انزعاج لدى المواطنين و يطالب المواطنين الجيش الحر والهيئة الشرعية بإيجاد حل لفوضى السلاح وإيجاد قوانين تنظّم بيع الأسلحة ويقول أغلب أصحاب محلات بيع السلاح أن أغلب زبائنهم من الجيش الحر وأغلب السلاح الذي لديهم يأتي من خلال الجيش الحر، حيث يقوم عناصر الجيش الحر بعملية التبادل مع صاحب المحل يعطونه سلاح فيعطيهم ذخيرة و في بعض الحالات يقوم الشبيحة ببيع السلاح للمدنيين فيقوم المدنيين ببيعه لمحلات بيع السلاح. و إن أغلب السلاح المتواجد في السوق هو سلاح روسي

المقابلة الاولى ابو محمد با ئع سلاح عمره ثمان وثلاثين سنة

المقابلة الثانية بائع ابوابراهيم عمره ستة وثلاثين سنة

المقابلة الثالثة مواطن عبد الله كرمو عمره ثلاث وثلاثين سنة

المقابلة الرابعة المواطن مصطفى عمره اثنان وعشرون سنة

Thumb sm
Wildlife Crimes (32 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

In light of the recent escalation in poaching the Thai government have assigned a unit of xxx to help tackle the poaching issue.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON