Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Two men are hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

A shipyard worker gets prepared to weld near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

17 year-old Ashraful has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. He breaks down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers to be scrapped. Most of them live by eating rice and vegetables. Ashraful cannot remember when he last ate meat.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A boy stops to pose for a photo while playing near a ship recycling yard in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A man is hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

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Child Labor in Venezuela's Andes
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

Pueblo Llano is at 800 km from Caracas, Venezuela's capital. This little town inside Los Andes is the main potatoes and carrot producer in the country. However, and despite the successful market with multinational companies like Frito-Lay as one the biggest clients, Pueblo Llano have deep social issues interconnected between them, child labor and high suicide rates.
Their main job is to plant and care for the crops of potatoes and carrots, using several toxic pesticides most of them prohibited by international laws. The landlord provides them with a precarious home, food and a US$ 1 daily salary. At harvest time, they make money depending on how many bags (of 70 Kg each) can be filled and carried down from the steep mountains.
The isolation of the town and the hard market between farmers make this town a place for avarice, most of the children from 9 to 13 years old leave the school and begin to work on the fields dreaming about making tons of money, however, the harvest not always become as they expected and, in some cases, they took their own lives away as the easiest exit.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

A 14 year old boy carry a 70 Kg bag of carrots in the field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers between 12 and 19 years old work on a carrots harvest in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

Gerson is 17, he came from Colombia at the age of 12 to work in Pueblo Llano. Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

The hands of workers after a day of work on a carrots harvest. Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

A 14 year old girl work on a carrots harvest in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers poses for a photograph before starting another day of work in the potatoes field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers take cover from the cold rain during work on a potatoes field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A teenager works on a potatoes harvest in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

Josein, a 13 year old worker, prepares his gloves during a potatoes harvest. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
04 Nov 2014

Cemetery of Pueblo Llano, Venezuela, a town with the highest suicide rate in Venezuela, 18 per 100.000 inhabitants.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
04 Nov 2014

Teenagers mark some words in a wall inside Pueblo Llano's cemetery. In this place women have been raped several times by drunk men. One of the reasons of suicides in Pueblo Llano is related with relationship problems.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Children play on their break from work with the crops inside the Adela Rojas Public School in Las Agujas zone in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Luis is 11 and prefers to help the adults harvest crops than to go to school in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

It is common to see children playing with their toys around the crops in Los Andes, that is how easy children can obtain pesticides that farmers leave behind in the fields. In Pueblo Llano, pesticides are the main weapon for suicides in agriculture zones around the world.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Teenager workers drive a motorbike inside the town of Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Most of the children who leave the school in Pueblo Llano dreams about getting a motorbike or a big truck to get the girls' attention.

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Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Several empty packages of pesticides are seen around the fields, schools, houses and neighborhoods in Pueblo Llano without warning. Pesticides are the main weapon of suicide in agriculture zones around the world.

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The Last Refugees in Choucha, Tunisia...
Choucha
By Filippo Del Bubba
16 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Choucha Refugee Camp, Southern Tunisia

The UNHCR Choucha Refugee Camp opened in 2011, seven kilometres away from the Ras Ajdir border crossing, to help the thousands of people fleeing the conflict in Libya. Most of the those who fled in 2011, returned home, but some 4,000 could not go back for fear of persecution. These individuals were granted refugee status by the UNHCR. Tunisia did not – and still does not – consider applicants for refugee status. According to UNHCR, most of the refugees from Choucha have already been taken by the United States (1,717) and Norway (485). The EU has been fairly strict on resettlement; Germany took the most refugees at 201, Britain took three, Italy two and France one. However, some still remain as they have nowhere else to go.
The Choucha camp was officially closed in June 2013, but approximately one hundred refugees still remain there. They insisted on remaining in the camp after it was closed despite the fact that all UNHCR food, water, and medical services were cut-off on June 30. 260 of the camp’s inhabitants, categorized as “rejected asylum seekers,” now find themselves in a dire situation. Falling outside of the UNHCR’s mandate, they are not entitled to the integration services that the organization offers to refugees and asylum seekers. The last time that the rejected asylum seekers here received food distribution aid was in October 2012. One of them is Bright O Samson, who is fighting against eviction from the camp, and is demanding resettlement to a safe third country with effective system of asylum seeker protection. Ismail is from Sudan and he fled to Libya in 2003 due to the war in his country. There, he found peace and a job as a mechanic, but the 2011 uprising forced him to leave again and cross the border into Tunisia. With no official structure supporting them, Ismail and other refugees from Chad, Ghana, Sudan, Liberia, and many other African countries, say they feel like they've been totally abandoned.

Full 30 minute video available: http://www.transterramedia.com/media/49074

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Big Questions
Chicago
By Patricia Werhane
19 Jun 2014

What is Big Questions?
It's a show about how people are changing the world, one idea at time. Each episode takes you inside issues that aren't ordinarily covered by the media. We want to bring you touching stories of people in need, and challenge you to get involved in creating a different future for the world. This is not reality television. It is a television show about reality.

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Aging in Place 12
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
30 Nov 2013

After earning selling a few meals to neighbors, Munah Smith prepares to go to the store for soap and dried cowpeas. She says she has been told she was born in 1930, but she doesn’t really know her birthday. Park Hill, Staten Island, October 2015.

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Aging in Place 13
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
30 Nov 2013

A portrait of Munah Smith on her way back to her apartment after shopping for groceries in the Park Hill neighborhood of Staten Island. Through the help of family, temporary tenants and selling home-cooked food she scrapes by.

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New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

Mr. Ge and his wife Liu receive a free dental check-up and voucher from NYU's School of Dentistry. Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 23
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

In an otherwise young city where the median age is 29-years-old, the aging population is increasingly overlooked. Of New York CityÕs more than 8 million residents, over 1 million are 60 years or older. Almost half are immigrants with specific language and cultural needs. Spurred by the immigration boom of the 1980s and 1990s, the challenges this growing population contends with reveals critical issues concerning access to health care and quality of life for a graying New York City. Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 24
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

An AMPHS volunteer answers clients' questions. Hewitt Chiu says they have to take time with each client to piece together a patient history for many have no documents. Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 25
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

Another patient, 65, who did not want to be identified (Ms. Chen Lee Fong), was seeking an AlzheimerÕs test and said she had read about AMPHS in the newspaper. Though she has Medicaid, she says she still hasnÕt found a culturally competent primary care physician that is in close proximity to her, even though 70% of Sunset Park is Chinese speaking. Clinics like this she said saved her time and money. And stress: ÒThere is no help for us,Ó she says, Òif I am in crisis I have to go all the way to the hospital in Chinatown and thatÕs not good. There have been times when I feel I am not understood.Ó Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 03
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
18 Nov 2013

A resident at Serviam Gardens takes the catwalk modeling a handmade dress.

"In my area of work it's mainly immigrants," says Gloria, "Americans donÕt seem to want those jobs. But in my country we take care of our old, so it makes sense for me."

Gloria sees reason behind the differences though: "In Jamaica, one person might work while the others tend to the home, so someone can take care of a grandmother. Here, you might have two people having to work, sometimes far way, so I understand that you canÕt always take care of those at home."

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Aging in Place 04
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
18 Nov 2013

Gloria murray, 66, models a handmade skirt at a fashion show at Serviam Gardens. After a house fire in 2010, still unresolved, Gloria spent two years navigating the shelter system. "I moved to three different spaces," she says. "Drugs, pimps, the whole lot. I finally went to Safe Horizons' office and told them: ÒThe places you guys are sending us, do you ever go there and go and look at where theyÕre putting us? You pay a lot of people but you donÕt go there and see where theyÕre putting us. And I started to cry."

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Aging in Place 01
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
17 Nov 2013

Gloria Murray, 66, in her apartment in the Bronx on the day she received her citizenship . Ms. Murray says she came to the US in 1986 leaving behind her children and life to make their lives better. "When I left for the US my youngest son was one year old.I did live-in home care starting at $3/hr. and sent everything home to my three sons and three daughters. It was a rough time. You cry night and day. While youÕre eating, youÕre crying. While youÕre working, youÕre crying. But God saw me through. Immigrants make BIG sacrifices." Bronx, New York, October 2015.