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Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's bo...
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Jul 2013

With the Cambodian election campaigns now in full swing ruling party CPP leader prime minister Hun Sen makes a highly guarded visit to Siem Reap to attend various meetings. Hun Sen is the second longest serving leader in Southeast Asia and is one of the longest serving prime ministers in the world, having been in power through various coalitions since 1985. In 1987, Amnesty International accused Hun Sen's government of torture of thousands of political prisoners using "electric shocks, hot irons and near-suffocation with plastic bags. Hun Sen's government has been responsible for the sale of vast amounts of land to foreign investors resulting in the forced eviction of thousands upon thousands of residents from their homes throughout the country.

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Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's bo...
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Jul 2013

Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's body guards have a joke with each other before starting their next watch. Siem Reap, Cambodia.

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Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's bo...
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Jul 2013

Prime minister Hun Sen's body guards stand proud for a photograph underneath a large sign commemorating the late king Norodom Sihanouk who died on the 15th October 2012. Siem Reap, Cambodia.

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Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's bo...
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Jul 2013

One of the Prime ministers many body guards stands proudly underneath a large sign commemorating the late king Norodom Sihanouk.

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Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's bo...
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Jul 2013

In advance of the Cambodian elections on the 28th of July, 2013, prime minister Hun Sen makes a highly guarded visit to Siem Reap to attend meetings. Siem Reap, Cambodia.

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Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's bo...
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Jul 2013

One of Cambodian prime minister Hun Sen's body guards wears a traditional red bracelet believed to bring good luck after the wearer has been blessed by a buddhist monk. Siam Reap, Cambodia.

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Produced
Global
By U.S. Editor
02 Apr 2013

Repository of produced material

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Stolen Brides: Syrian Refugee Women i...
Al Mafraq, Jordan
By Sharron Ward
29 Mar 2013

An exclusive powerful film exposing the sexual exploitation and abuse of Syrian refugee women who are subjected to "pleasure marriages," rape, kidnapping and sexual harassment in Za’atari refugee camp, Jordan.
Duration: 10 minutes
Format: HD 16:9 1080i 1920 x 1080 25 fps, Apple Pro Res HQ 422 PAL
Viewing format: 4:3 low res version

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Slum Echoes - Street Angels Foundatio...
Kampala, Uganda
By William Ranieri
01 Feb 2013

Documentary: Slum Echoes -- Street Angels Foundation Uganda
Kisenyi is the oldest slum/ghetto in Kampala. The Mask and the Teacher will guide you through an incredible journey along this multi-ethnic reality. We meet the Karamojong women, listen to real story of the kids of the slum and dance to unique music. Witness the incredible reality in the heart of Kampala.
This video was realized
with no funding
as a tribute
for all Kids in Slums
around the world.

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Citizen Paparazzi Informants in South...
Seoul, South Korea
By maltekol
15 Sep 2012

South Korean School Teaches Neighbors To Spy On Neighbors
Law-breakers in South Korea, beware.
Citizens who videotape illegal activity are on the loose and making extra income by selling the tapes to the police.
But some observers say a school that trains these citizen spies is turning neighbour against neighbour.

Ji Soo-hyun leads a double life. Starting six-months ago the housewife began a career catching lawbreakers red handed. The 54-year old says her specialty is going undercover at private tutoring schools.

INT: (Korean) Ji Soo-hyun, Citizen Paparazza
“I pretend that I am going to enroll my kids in the school. I ask the faculty about extra services. There are a lot of illegal activities in these schools, like staying open too late and charging additional fees. These are the types of things I record.”

When Ji is on her mission, she uses a small, concealed camera she hides in her bag. She is one of several hundred citizens who have been trained to record secret video of other people and businesses that break the law.

(Video Courtesy of Seoul Paparazzi School) This video was taken at a pharmacy in Seoul. Another citizen spy recorded the cashier that didn’t charge for a plastic bag, which is required by law in South Korea.The cameraman, as well as Ji Soo-hyun, are students of the Seoul paparazzi school.Here they learn the ins and outs of taking undercover video. They can try out tiny cameras that are disguised as jewelry. And they are taught which illegal activities can make them the most money if reported to the authorities.

Moon Seong-ok has run the paparazzi academy for 14 years. He helps his students find buyers for their secret footage.

INT: (KOREAN) Moon Seong-ok, Director, Seoul Paparazzi School
“The students who come here want to make money. I contact them with police agencies, local governments, health agencies and education authorities who pay them.”

Moon claims citizen paparazzi can earn between 20 and 30,000 dollars a year.But some other citizens are concerned that money is turning neighbors into spies. Koo Ja-kyoung describes himself as an ordinary guy who is alarmed at what paparazzi students are doing to his community.

INT: (KOREAN) Koo Ja-kyoung, Seoul
“I was just walking around one day and I saw an old lady crying. I asked her what was wrong and she told me she had to pay a fine because she put out the garbage using an unauthorized plastic bag. She said that a citizen paparazzo took a picture of her and gave it to the police.”

Koo says he was so upset with that woman’s story that he filed a complaint with the National Human Rights’ Commission.
That was several years ago and according to the Commision, until now Koo it’s the only person to complain about citizen paparazzi. The Commission has yet to decide whether or not to hear the case. Its not that South Koreans don’t care about this alleged spying, it’s that they are afraid to speak out against it.

That’s according to Chun Sang-chin, a sociologist at Seoul’s Sogang University. He says most citizens don’t like what the paparazzi do.

INT: (KIREAN) Chun Song-chin, Sogang University
“There is a certain cultural sensitivity here. People are worried that if they come forward and complain then others will think they are actually doing something wrong or illegal. They want others to think that what they do privately is as good as what they do publically, so they stay quiet about these things.”

Chun says the government should stop paying for these secret videos.

INT: Chun
“The government is outsourcing its responsibilities to the citizens. Everyone knows that is wrong. But if you look at Korea’s political history, of dictatorship, it just isn’t a concern for most people. I think it would be hard to create a public debate about the paparazzi”

So for now, South Koreans will do their best to keep their private lives behind closed doors. Moon Seong-ok of the Seoul paparazzi school says he feels no shame about what he or his students do.

INT: (KOREAN) Moon Seong-ok, Director of Seoul paparazzi School
“Good citizens who abide by the law like what the paparazzi citizens do. But for those who break the law, they are the ones who are uncomfortable with what my students do.”

Citizen paparazza Ji Soo-hyun agrees. She says she does not feel sympathy for people breaking the law.

INT: (KOREAN) Ji Soo-hyun, Citizen Paparazza
“At first I felt guilty about reporting on these people, but the more I did it, I realized how much illegal activity is going on around us. These people are not poor or struggling to make a living, so I do not feel bad about reporting on them.”

Ji says she is now turning her camera on people who skip out on paying their taxes.

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Spider Hunters (21 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The tarantulas are first drowned and washed in water before being tossed in salt and cooked in oil.

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Spider Hunters (22 of 22)
Svay Leur, Cambodia
By George Nickels
09 Aug 2012

The children prefer to eat the head first then strip the meat from the legs leaving the abdomen containing the precious eggs until last.

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TTM Documentaries
Beirut, Lebanon
By Beirut Editor's Picks
24 Sep 2010

TRANSTERRA is becoming more than just a marketplace where producers can showcase and sell their documentaries. We are a resource for archive footage, and a community that provides collaboration opportunities.

The documentaries shown here are part of TRANSTERRA's greater catalog of options. Full-length screenings are available for most, and you can access these by sending an e-mail request to [email protected].