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Civilians Flee Southern Aden by Boats...
Aden, Yemen
By Edouard Dufrasne
07 May 2015

Aden, Yemen
May 7, 2015

People from Touwayi flee their neighbourhood by boat, as Houthi militias advance in Aden, Yemen.

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Aden Civilians Flee by Boats
Aden
By Khaled Lekra
06 May 2015

Aden, Yemen
May 6, 2015

Civilians in Aden are only able to leave dangerous areas in the city in small boats after traveling by land became too dangerous.
Dozens of families are seen in this video arriving on the shore of al-Husswa area in Aden after fleeing the heavily embattled quarters of Mualla, Tawahi and Crater. A local militia commander who is fighting against the Houthis says that more than 1,500 families have so far arrived from other areas of Aden by boats.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Moving shot of small boats carrying refugees at sea
Moving shot of small boats approaching the shore
Various of refugees disembarking
Wide of a man talking to a woman on wheelchair
Various of militiamen handing out drinking water to refugees
Wide of people pushing a boat on the shore
Wide of small boat in the sea

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Refugee
02:03 – 02:24
“There was indiscriminate shelling. This was why we left our homes and fled to a safer location. [UNINTELLIGIBLE] families have fled through ports. More than 15 families left because they were panicking. We left our homes and came as refugees.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Refugee
02:25 – 02:36
“[UNINTELLIGIBLE] we were tired of the situation. Q: What happened?
A: There was bombing.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Refugee
02:36 – 03:19
“We fled the area of Tawahi because of indiscriminate bombing by the militias of Houthi and Affash [Ali Abdullah Saleh]. They bombed our homes ruthlessly. We have been trying to escape since dawn. Thanks be to God, we have now arrived safely. Thanks be to God, as you can see…
They [militias] are positioned and sniping unarmed civilians. We managed to exit safely, thanks be to God.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Shawqi Abdullah Nis, Spokesperson of the Popular Committees Militias
03:19 – 04:29
“Today we [UNINTELLIGIBLE] We receive wounded people yesterday. They were transferred to Bureihi hospital. There were four cases. Today, we started at 6:30 am and we are still working. We have received nearly 1,500 families, which were taken to the areas of [UNINTELLIGIBLE] Madinat Shaab, Sheikh Uthman and Mansoura.
Some families were assembled and taken to schools, such as al-Johari and [UNINTELLIGIBLE] schools.
Also, some families were taken to Madinat al-Shaab with the help of some men [fighters] there. We also collaborated with the residents of Inma and Abu Harba areas, as well as residents of Bir Ahmed village.
Some families included wounded people. We received about six or seven injured people today, who were taken to Bureihi hospital.
A boat drowned as a result of the bombing -- the barbarian aggression by the Houthis and Affash [Ali Abdullah Saleh]. The fate of the boat is still unknown.
It was said that the boat was transporting families and a mortar shell landed in its middle.”
Wide of presidential palace in Tawahi
Wide of oil tanks
Wide of neighbourhood
Medium of a man on the shore looking through a pair of binoculars
Medium of a family on the shore looking at the sea
Wide of speedboat/ zoom out family on the shore looking at the sea

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Vigil in Berlin for Migrants Drowned ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

A vigil was held in Berlin to commemorate the hundreds of migrants who died in the shipwreck off the Libyan coast on April 19. People taking part laid candles and flowers on the street. The ceremony turned into a peaceful protest in front of the European Commission Berlin office in an attempt to raise awareness about the need to step up search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 02
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

A man offers a lighted candle during the vigil on Unter den Linden street in Berlin.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 03
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

A young man lighting a candle at the vigil in Berlin to commemorate the hundreds who died in the shipwreck in the Mediterranean.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 04
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

A man and a woman during the one minute silence to commemorate the hundreds who died in the shipwreck in the Mediterranean.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 05
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

A young woman placing a candle on a bike during the vigil to commemorate the hundreds who died in the shipwreck in the Mediterranean.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 06
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

People lighting candles on Unter den Linden street in Berlin to commemorate the hundreds who died in the shipwreck in the Mediterranean.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 07
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

A man holding a candle during the vigil to commemorate the hundreds who died in the shipwreck in the Mediterranean.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 08
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Apr 2015

Candles and flowers laid in front of the European Commission office in Berlin.

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Vigil for drowned migrants 01
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
22 Apr 2015

A woman holds a candle and a flyer in Berlin Unter den Linden asking “Fortress Europe” to open up its borders.

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Yemenis, Foreigners Flee Aden by Sea
Main Street, Aden,Yemen
By Amged Sabeeh
21 Apr 2015

April 21, 2015
Aden, Yemen

Dozens of Yemenis and foreigners are seen in this video, filmed at a seaport in Aden, preparing to travel in small boats to Djibouti or Somalia. According to local sources, around 400 people are fleeing through the port of Aden every day. Most of them travel illegally to east Africa.

The trip to Somalia costs 50 US dollars per person and takes about 16 hours, while it costs 90 dollars per person to reach Djibouti, in a trip that takes about 12 hours by sea.

SHOTLIST

Various of boats near the dock
Various of Aden port entrance
Various of passengers and militiamen inside the seaport
Wide of travellers waiting in seaport parking lot
Traveling of boat carrying passengers
Various of people embarking on boat hoisting Yemeni and Djiboutian flags
Interview with Yemeni man fleeing to Djibouti

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Yemeni Fleeing Aden
01:56

“In the name of God, I am one of the people who have been affected by this war – the aggression by Houthi and his aides, who have bombed our homes. We are unarmed people and now we are homeless. We have become refugees in our homeland.”

02:10
“We were forced to flee to Djibouti. We do not want to leave our country, but we do not have homes any more. We are suffering a lot because of the invasion by [Abdul Malik] Houthi, who does not fear God. He has no mercy for women or children. As you can see, many people are fleeing. Their homes have been destroyed. Children have become homeless.”

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon

December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, woman) Siham Jumaa

(00:07) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport (00:13).

(00:14) When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now (00:28).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Skype between Palestinian refugee Ibrahim al-Khatib and a people smuggler in Sudan.

(00:29) We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous (00:34).

(00:36) You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there is not any other road (00:59).

(01:00) We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy (01:07).

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon
December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets
2 Various of children
3 Various of woman at home
4 Various of children playing in the street
5 C/S of Yasser Arafat’s photos on camp wall
6 M/S of streets in camps
7 Various of streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Lama Baqlouni

(00:41) This is my son Mustafa, he is 15 years old. He is imprisoned in Egypt now. And this is my daughter Nisrine, she is also detained with her brother in Egypt (00:57).

(00:58) My children are orphans now, their father died. We need someone to help them get out of prison. It has been two months, they are tired and sick. We need someone to help them move to another country so they can continue their lives as normal people (01:15).

(01:17) We left Lebanon to Homs where I got a smuggler’s number. I called him and he told me to take them to Hama with $250 for each. We went to Hama and paid the amount needed, and then he took them to Turkey, where they stayed in a hotel. We got the contacts of smugglers who will be able to take them to Italy. The fees ranged between $5,000 and $6,000 for each child, depending on the smuggler. We asked people for money – people we knew and others that we did not. They took them to the Turkish coasts to be transported to Italy, and made them wait from 7PM to 1AM (02:15).

(02:18) They were supposed to take them first in a small boat, and then move them to a bigger ship. They were stopped by the coast guards and imprisoned in Turkey for a day, on condition to make them sign a pledge that they will never get out of Turkey again. They were freed the next day. On the same day they got out of jail, the smuggler said they will try to leave Turkey one more time. They got on board on the same day, but the captain kept going in circles in the sea for five days (02:59).

(03:10) They arrived to an island and the captain ordered them to leave the boat. They did not agree at first, but he told them he will get them accommodations in Egypt, and they were threatened by guns and knives. My daughter told me that they got very scared. Everybody started to scream, and they threw four men in the sea (03:27).

(03:35) Syrians were sent back to Turkey but Palestinians were allowed to go there (03: 39).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Siham Jumaa

(04:07) This is my husband’s passport, he sent it to the smuggler to get a visitor’s visa to Sudan (04:16).

(04:32) We lost our house and everything because of the war in Syria. Life is hard here in Lebanon, we should pay a monthly rent for our house and life is expensive. This is the main reason why my husband decided to do this trip, and if I had money, I would do the same thing (04:49).

(04:52) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport. He travelled to Dubai first and then to Sudan. When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now. His plan was to go to Italy after Libya, either from the coasts of Benghazi or Tripoli. He paid $4,000 for the whole trip from Beirut to Italy. But I heard nothing from him since he got to Libya (05:58).

(06:05) I do not have money. I sold all my jewelry and my wedding ring, and I even had to beg for money from people so we can get the 3000USD for his trip. Once he arrived to Libya, his brothers donated 1000USD for his trip. The whole trip cost $4,000 (06:21).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Skype conversion between Ibrahim al-Khatib and smuggler based in Sudan

(07:18) Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to travel. Smuggler: Welcome, I will help you
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Can I please know what the process is? I am a Syrian Palestinian, and I am in Lebanon.
Smugglers: Where would you like to go?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to go to Europe; I want to know the procedures, and how much it costs. This is the most important thing. We have no money and I have to borrow money if I want to travel. You have to give me discount and help me, please.
Smuggler: The person who told you about me, did he not tell you where I can take you?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: The person who told me about you went to Sudan. He went from Sudan to Libya and then to Italy.
Smuggler: Are you seriously intending to do it?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I am, I am asking about the expenses because I have a wife and children and I want to know [how much money] I should leave for them and how much to take with me, I want to know about the road, if it is safe, or not, and how this whole thing is going to be arranged. I want to know how I am going to give you the money, or my passport. Will I receive a visa, or not? I do not want to go without knowing anything.
Smuggler: We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous. You will go from [Lebanon] to Sudan - the road is easy - but from Sudan to Libya, we have five days in the desert. You have to think of all the odds, the desert is more dangerous than the sea. The sea is also unstable, but we can go across it and count on God to help us.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is your name?
Smuggler: I am Abu Yehya.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What I want to know is that, if I decide to go to Sudan, how will you get me the visa? Is it an invitation, or a visa, how can I guarantee that the process will go as agreed?
Smuggler: You will get a regular visa, and you should not be concerned with how you receive it – you will have it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that some people are being fooled and they are getting visas that do not work. Is that true of is it lying? Can I be sure that it will work?
Smuggler: It is not true, the trip to Sudan is fully legitimate, and you can make sure yourself.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about the cost?
Smuggler: Concerning the cost, the visa alone will cost you $1,500 and you have to pay for the plane ticket. From Sudan to Libya it will cost you $1,800. The trip from Sudan to Italy will cost you $3,200.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that from Libya to Italy, it costs $2,200, why do you charge $3,200? Is it more expensive now?
Smuggler: We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, now I understand. Will I have to cross the desert from Sudan to Libya?
Smuggler: Yes, the only road we have is through the desert. You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there isn’t any other road.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about Turkey, do you know anyone there?
Smuggler: Yes, I do. Syrian-Palestinians are not allowed to travel to Turkey, but we can arrange something. However, the trip to Turkey will cost you 10,000 euros.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is the process?
Smuggler: We can travel by sea, on plane or by bus.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Is there a way to go to Turkey from Lebanon, through the sea?

Smuggler: No, not at all, everyone used to say that they can go from Lebanon, but it is not possible. And I am not even in Lebanon, I am in Sudan.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I can see that you have a Sudanese number.

Smuggler: Yes, that is right, and I heard about many people who got caught while being smuggled out of Lebanon. If you are determined to go, send me a copy of your passport and $1,000 and you will give me the rest of the money when you get there.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Since I do not know you and you do not know me, how can I guarantee that you will not take the money and disappear? I want some sort of a guarantee.
Smuggler: I might send people to meet you, but at the end this is your choice; this how it is done, you chose either to do it or not. Many others have done it and if someone is afraid, then it would be better he did not do it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I wanted to ask about the procedure, and I am intending to go, I just have to figure out how to get the money, because it is available.
Smuggler: You can contact me if you want and we will make an agreement.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Some people are getting caught in Turkey. They are reaching an area in the middle of the sea, and then they are being handed over to the Egyptian police. We heard about a few Syrian-Palestinians who are now imprisoned in Egypt.

You said that through the desert, whatever happens, you cannot be held responsible. But what about going by the sea? How can you be sure about what might happen? Smugglers themselves handed people over to the Egyptian police.
Smuggler: You have to consider the fact that you are going to be smuggled, and you are not traveling legally. You have to keep in mind all the troubles that can happen. You are not going legally, we are smuggling you. I am not trying to scare you, most of the people that we smuggled have made it there, unless if the person was unlucky – this is something else.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Just as you are telling me that some people reached safely, I heard of other who drowned, women and children died.
Smuggler: Are you interrogating me or what?

Ibrahim al-Khatib: No, I am not interrogating you; do not get me wrong, but I am paying money and I am traveling with my family. I want to guarantee my safety.
Smuggler: Let me tell you something; if you want to leave, count on God, and leave. But if you keep telling me that this happened to those people and you will keep thinking of that, you will never travel. If you will keep thinking in a negative way, stay in Lebanon.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: My whole point is that I am going with my family, if something happens to me, it will be fine, I will manage, but my wife and children would not be able to survive.
Smuggler: count on God, God will have mercy on them.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, I will contact you again when I get the money, and think more about it. I am sorry for taking too much of your time. Thank you
Smuggler: No problem, you are welcome.

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Dal Lake and Jamia Masjid Mosque, Kas...
Srinagar, India
By Umar Mehraj
14 Aug 2014

Dal Lake in Srinagar, India is the second largest in the state and is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir.

Jamia Masjid is the main Friday mosque in Srinagar. The mosque built in 1400 AD is situated at Nowhatta, in the middle of the old city.

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Nomads of the Sea 18
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children are going out into the ocean to look for seafood during the low tide in Mabul island, Malaysia. Whenever the weather permits, they take bowls and spoons and swim or crawl under the water looking around and looking for anything eatable to add to their family table.

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Nomads of the Sea 21
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children play in the water in Mabul island, Malaysia. Water is their home, playground and main source of food.

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Nomads of the Sea 20
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Studies on some children from Thailand and Burma, living in similar communities, show that they have unusually good underwater-vision because their eyes have adapted to the liquid environment.

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Nomads of the Sea 22
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children wait for their parents to come back from Semporna town, Malaysia. Since they are very little, Bajau kids are taught to sail, fish and do other activities necessary for their survival in the ocean.

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Nomads of the Sea 19
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Minjul and his friends look for seafood as they play underwater in Mabul Island, Malaysia. Studies on children in similar communities show that they have unusually good underwater-vision because their eyes have adapted to the liquid environment.

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Nomads of the Sea 25
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Woman is preparing food by her stilt house in Sibuan island, Malaysia.

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Nomads of the Sea 24
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau woman pours water away from her boat, near her small stilt house just right offshore Sibuan island, Malaysia.

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Nomads of the Sea 23
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

A lot of Bajau have moved from the boats and built themselves small houses on the coral reef or on the islands. There are about 100 Bajau living in Sibuan island. Might be that in the future all of Bajau are going to settle down and there won’t be any boats floating around Semporna town and other island in the region anymore.

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Nomads of the Sea 26
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children selling seafood and begging for money around the resorts in Mabul island.
A lot of Bajau children don’t go to school and just like their parents are not able to read nor write.

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Nomads of the Sea
Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

The Bajau Laut are one of the last nomads of the sea left. An ethnic group of Malay origin, these "sea gypsies" live on their boats for their entire lives, roaming in between the Coral Triangle (marine waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste). There might be anywhere from five to over 20 people living on one boat, spending all of their time together, moving from one place to another. The ocean is everything to the Bajau.

They live out their lives on the sea, and are so accustomed to the water that when they are on solid ground, some of Bajau say they start to feel 'island sickness' and hurry back to their home on the ocean. Though the number of these nomads is decreasing, as the fish that they depend on disappear from the seas with dynamite or cyanid fishing. Exploitive fishing was very popular up to a few years ago. Now cyanide and dynamite are prohibited in the area, though, as locals report, explosions still can be heard. Living in unity with the ocean allows the Bajau to develop extraordinary ability to free dive. They can go as deep as 20 meters down to look for seafood. They also used to dive for pearls. Studies on some children from Thailand and Burma, living in similar communities, show that they have unusually good underwater-vision because their eyes have adapted to the liquid environment.

Most of the Bajau doesn't have any documents, they doesn't know their age nor where they were born. Alee came to Mabul from Philippines and was working in one of the resorts on the island. He asked his boss to help him create a school for stateless children after he saw that so many kids in the island don’t have a possibility to learn. In the beginning Alee worked with only 4 children, but now over 80 students come to his classes.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Nomads of the Sea 05
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Sempula plays on the side of the boat while the rest of his family talk on the deck, their "living room," close to the shores of Semporna town. The family spends most of the time hanging out on the deck, looking through the windows, preparing food and playing games. The Bajau Laut, also known as sea gypsies, are an indigenous ethnic group who have retained a seaborne lifestyle, living in the boats, roaming in between the Coral Triangle or settling in small stilt houses built on the reef or islands.

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Nomads of the Sea 07
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Langring is resting at the end of the boat. The whole in the floor is used as bathroom. Family also has a few smaller boats, that they use for fishing and going to Semporna town or other islands.

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Nomads of the Sea 08
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Bajau living on boats in the Semporna area, Malaysia.
Currently, in the Malaysian state of Sabah, Bajau are stated to be the second largest ethnic group. However, exact figures of their population are unknown. More and more of them are moving to live on land voluntarily or forcibly.
!Most of the Bajau don’t have any documents, they don’t know their age nor where they were born. A new-married couple stays with their parents or gets a new boat for themselves and starts independent life. Then often relationship with family members don’t last, as the boats miss each other in the vast waters.

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Nomads of the Sea 06
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Sempula is playing on the boat. He is the youngest member of the family, always looking for some activities - climbing onto the roof of the boat, walking on the sides or running around.

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Nomads of the Sea 09
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Siboto is looking for louses in Langring's hair.

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Nomads of the Sea 11
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Langring is brushing his teeth on the board of the boat early in the morning.

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Nomads of the Sea 10
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Aranaki shaves on his boat close to Semporna town, Malaysia. Recently, his family has not moved their boat too much, preferring to stay close to the town, just floating a bit further from the fish market.

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Nomads of the Sea 12
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Siboto brushes her teeth in the "bathroom" at the back of the boat. There is also a family's kitchen where members of the family make food and eat together. During the day, Siboto helps other women with daily work or plays with Sempula and Langring.

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Nomads of the Sea 15
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Family on the deck is looking for some activities to spend the day. To get some money, they make carpets from water plants, sell them in Semporna town and buy clothes or food.

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Nomads of the Sea 16
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Shigesh is dressing up in the morning, while Sempula is urinating over the board. The rest of the family is still sleeping on the boat, floating close to the town of Semporna, Malaysia.

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Nomads of the Sea 13
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

The back of the boat is the family’s kitchen, where they make food and eat together. Their neighbours float around with smaller and bigger boats.
There might be 5 to over 20 people living on boat, moving from one place to another and spending all of their time together.

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Nomads of the Sea 14
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Lakit applies 'burak' - a powder made of waterweeds or rice and a yellow spice - to her face, to cool it down and protect it from the sun. Lakit is the one who takes care of looks in the family - she shaves everyone's eyebrows, makes their hair and takes care of their skin.

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Nomads of the Sea 17
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Night on the boat in the waters of Semporna, close to the town. The whole family sleeps on the deck under the roof. They go to sleep when the darkness falls and gets up with the sunrise every day. If it starts raining during the night, women are pumping water from the bottom of the boat.

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Nomads of the Sea 35
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Jan 2014

Dried fish hanging in the family boat. Bajau Laut dry fish to eat it later or to sell it in the market to earn money to buy other kinds of food.