Thumb sm
Yörük carpet
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

The Yörük tradition stays alive through handwoven carpets and clothing made from wool, as seen here in a blanket.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

Thumb sm
Women Shepherds
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Shepherds move their herd to graze on the mountainside while dodging Mercedes, Hondas, Fords, Chevrolets, Audis and other various foreign cars.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

Thumb sm
Young Girl with Sheep
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

A young girl, following her father and stray sheep, fixes her hair while keeping in line.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

Thumb sm
Shopping Sheep
Çobanisa, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Tradition mixes with modern life on this street corner in Çobanisa. The local market opens shop, but is challenged by sheep on their way home and the Audi that blocks their trail.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

Thumb sm
Kuzu "Sheep"
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Sheep are on their way back home after a day grazing on the mountainside.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

Thumb sm
3 Generations, Hasan Ali, Mehmet and ...
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Hasan Ali, 92 years old, insists the way of life for the Yörük is finished.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

Thumb sm
Turkish Nomads
Turkey
By Mais Istanbuli
16 Feb 2013

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. With modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of them have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the coast.

Frame 0004
Underground Car Races in Adana Preview
Adana, Turkey
By Ibrahim Karci
15 Feb 2013

00.01-00.05
Adana! Mostly known as the city of Kebab.

00.07-00.12
People of Adana have reputation of their crazy and chilled lifestyle.

00:12-0018
Spacious areas, good spicey food, cool booze and..

00:18-00-20
..FAST CARS!

00:38 - 00:37
-I can't attend every race because I can't afford it. I can't use LPG during the race and the oil quiet expensive. And each race there is some part broken that has to be fixed or changed. It costs a lot.

01:00-01:25
This is an opening of another new garage where the racers mostly meet to show off.
And since it is in the middle of the city resident of the neighbourhood is not so happy with the situation.

01:29-01:34
-It is vandalism. This is not a race track, this is neighbourhood. It is sunday and peple are resting. They don't have right to disturb people.

01:36-01:37
-Cop is Coming!

01:45-01:58
And soon after officers arrives upon the complaint of the neighbourhood, as always.

01:58-02:01
-Take these cars immediately! -Ok sir!

02:11-02:14
-They said if it occurs again they will punish us so bad.

02:16-02:21
-Should we go to the highway all together or to the hill ? -To the hill. The highway is also problematic now.

02:25-02:35
But nothing seems like to be avoid them from racing or gathering up, Because they always have an alternative secret place to gather up and start racing.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (6 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
03 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Mustafa Can is a camel handler and works at a camel stable in Burhaniye, a town in the Aegean region of Turkey, where camel wrestling is a popular age old tradition.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (16 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
03 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel socuk is a sausage made from a mixture of camel and beef and is served as a novelty during camel wrestling tournaments. Camels that are not able to wrestle often end up slaughtered for their meat.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (7 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A man shows his granddaughter one of the camels participating in the Pelitkoy camel wrestling tournament. About a hundred camels compete each weekend, though no winner is declared.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (8 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A camel is prepared for wrestling by having it's muzzle removed and a rope tied around it's mouth. The rope is used to control the camel and separate it from it's opponent before either creature is injured.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (9 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A camel pins it's opponent during a wrestling tournament held in a village in the Aegean region of Turkey. No champions are declared, and most often the bouts end in a tie. Owners say winning is not important.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (10 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Spectators grill meat, drink raki and dance to music performed by Roma (Gypsy) musicians during a camel wrestling tournament held in a village in the Aegean region of Turkey.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (11 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Participants relax during an unseasonably warm February day at a camel wrestling tournament in the town of Pelitkoy in the Aegean region of Turkey.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (12 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Mustafa Can unloads a camel from a truck after it competed in a camel wrestling tournament.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (13 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel owner Mustafa Akgun tries to coax a reluctant
camel into a truck in order to be transported to a competition in nearby town of Pelitkoy in the Aegean region of Turkey, where camel wrestling is popular.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (1 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Male camels wrestle by trying to pin their opponents neck down to the ground. Competition between male camels over females is common and camels can't be trained to wrestle, according to many Turkish camel owners.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (2 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camels are decorated with handmade decorations made of felt, beads and shells.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (3 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel owner Ahmet Sorsilmaz from Bodrum, Turkey, kisses his camel on the morning before a wrestling tournament.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (4 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A man leads his camel around the arena at Pelitkoy Camel Wrestling tournament before a match.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (5 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Elaborate handmade decorations are used to decorate camels that compete in wrestling matches, a popular sport in Western Turkey.

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (14 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Burhaniye, Turkey-- January 26, 2013-- Adolescent camels brought from Iran are being raised for sale at a stable in Burhaniye, Turkey.

Thumb sm
CAMEL WRESTLING IN TURKEY
Istanbul, Turkey
By Mais Istanbuli
02 Feb 2013

Both a tourist attraction and a local pastime in Turkey, camel wrestling is a time-old competition celebrated annually nearly every weekend in the Aegean region from November until March. The tournaments traditionally coincide with the olive harvest. Some camel owners explained that in the past, camels were used to help transport the fruit from the orchards. The biggest and most popular camel wrestling festival is held in Selcuk, near the ancient Greek ruins of Ephesus.

On one cool morning, Mustafa Can led a stubborn camel to be loaded onto a waiting truck. From the stable in the Aegean coast town of Burhaniye, a dozen camel were being transported to nearby Pelitkoy, where an annual camel wrestling tournament is held. Villagers and fans packed into stadium chairs, set up barbecue grills and tables in truck beds surrounded the arena in order to enjoy the action. The annual camel wrestling tournament is the most exciting day of the year in Pelitkoy, and everyone from the local mayors, to farm workers, to Roma musicians, have crowded around a small arena to watch the action. More than 100 camels and their owners from all over the region converge to practice the sport which is Turkish is called "deve guresi" and is believed to have brought to Turkey more than 2000 years ago.

Two by two, the massive and highly decorated animals, wearing elaborate hand-embroidered saddles, and draped with red banners reading "mashallah" were escorted by their owners into the ring, bells ringing. Frothing at the mouth from excitement and anxiety, the animals jostle with their opponents, trying to pin their opponent's neck to the ground while their owners yell word of encouragement.

"Camels are very sensitive, like a child," says Savran, a camel trainer from Burhaniye. "You should really understand them." He explain that trainers get to know each camel's voice and the camel, likewise, know's that of his trainer.

As white streams of saliva draw zig zags through the air, two teams of camel handlers stand close by. In case the fighters get too serious, they are ready to use ropes to separate the 1000-1500 kilo animals named after fast cars, like Audi, or beautiful places, like Florida, or fighters, like Crazy Ozel.

Fights end after 10 minutes. A winner is declared if one camel forces the other to the ground, or if one camel walks away from battle, forfeiting the match. The level of violence is low compared to other animal fighting sports, though a few camels ended up with nose-bleeds. Oftentimes, no winner is declared. That seems of little importance to the crowd, though, many of whom are busily grilling camel sausage and drinking raki, Turkey's anise-flavored brandy. The crash of a drum, accompanied by wild clarinet playing and violin is reason enough for some of the men to dance, while others enjoy smoking water pipes.

These days, most camels are imported from Iran-- including a half-dozen soft, big-eyed juveniles who are for sale in Burhaniye. A good fighting camel is worth as much as $15,000, but most owners say their camels are not for sale.

"We don't drive luxury cars," says a camel owner named Akin. "We don't drive a good car, but we have a good camel."

As the clear afternoon began turning to dusk, the tournament concluded with a camel procession through the town. Then the camel owners began again the arduous process of coaxing the animals into the truck beds. The following weekend would see yet another camel tournament in a different Aegean town.

  • Jodi Hilton
Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (15 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camels compete during a wrestling tournament held in the village of Pelitkoy in the Aegean region of Turkey.

Frame 0004
Exploitation in Istanbul's Sweatshops
Istanbul, Turkey
By DanielEtter
01 Feb 2013

ONLY PREVIEW VIDEO FOR PITCH: Istanbul is home to a large number of underground sweatshops, where illegal immigrants coming from southern asia work for exploitive wages. Taking advantage of their perilous legal status and their need to make money for their onward clandestine journey to Europe, factory owners employ these immigrants for repetitive and tedious work. Many of theme are underage – some only 12 years old. They get paid less than 0,50 USD per hour. Human traffickers take 1000 USD for the illegal border crossing to Greece.

The proposed video (3 to 5 minutes) will follow an underage refugee over the course of several days, show his daily routines and interactions and establish an emotional connection to him, letting him talk about their past, their hopes and dreams.

In longer form, this piece could also explore the larger structures behind this phenomenon – interviewing smugglers, factory owners and migration experts.

Thumb sm
The syrian nakba 41
Atmeh
By adrian
01 Jan 2013

Young children watch a football game between clothes drying on a fence in Islahiye refugee camp for Syrians in southern Turkey.

Thumb sm
The syrian nakba 42
Atmeh
By adrian
01 Jan 2013

A tent in the Islahiye refugee camp for Syrians, in Turkey, home to almost four thousand people fleeing the violence.

Thumb sm
Syrian Rescue Robot 8
Kilis, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
01 Jan 2013

The former hacker turned robot developer has spent the last year in a cramped hotel room experimenting with remote controls and circuits.

Thumb sm
Syrian Limb Center 5
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Dec 2012

The process of fitting legs is difficult and also requires many check-ups afterwards.

Thumb sm
Prosthetic Limb Center in Turkey
reyhanli
By Leyland Cecco
26 Dec 2012

A prosthetic limb center recently opened just outside Reyhanli, Turkey. The center helps those who have lost limbs in the fighting in Syria. The center manufactures high quality prosthetics on-site, assigns them to the wounded and helps with the rehabilitation process afterwards. The clinic now produces limbs with a quality that can be compared to European standards, however, none of the staff at the center have a medical background. Some of the staff are previous patients, and have been trained by teams visiting from teams that also visit Pakistan, the UK and elsewhere in Turkey. The clinic is already treating up to 10 patients a day, but there are thousands more in need. To reach them those in need, there are plans in progress to launch a mobile center that will work from inside Syria next year.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
15 Dec 2012

Maysam Selmo, 8, during her second day at Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children. She and her extended family fled their village in Idlib province of Syria. Now they live in a crowded apartment in the old city of Antakya. The school is overcrowded with 500 students and new students constantly arriving. Last week alone 115 new students enrolled.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

A minibus drops children to the homes after school. Syrian refugee families a spread throughout Antakya, a small city close to the Syrian border, despite a new law prohibited them from residing there.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Some Syrian children play at wrestling and fighting during recess while others play games, eat snacks and socialize at Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children. Violent play is common with traumatized children, especially those who have experienced violence.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Children, including students at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children, often show signs of trauma after what they've experienced in Syria. After not attending for many months, some more than a year, many are happy just to be back in school.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Seventh grade students study at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children's upper school. Overcrowding has forced administrators to open a second building to accommodate new arrivals.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

At the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee's upper school, Emine Kusa leads a Turkish class to eighth grade students. The school opened nearly two years ago when refugees began arriving in Turkey. The school recently opened a second building to accommodate a rapidly expanding student population.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

A first grade student at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children shows her drawing which includes the free Syria flag, chains, a yellow sun and big green heart.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

During class, first-grade students draw tanks and free Syria flags in class at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children. They are wearing Turkish school uniforms that were received as a donation.

Thumb sm
School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Nureddin, 11, left, who arrived with his mother to Antakya after his father was killed 15 days ago in Syria, registers for the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children, which is free for Syrian children living in Turkey.