Thumb sm
University of Amsterdam 04
Amsterdam, Netherlands
By Nicola Zolin
24 Mar 2015

Students listen to a lecture by French philosopher Jacques Rancière one month after the occupation of the Maagdenhuis, the University of Amsterdam's administrative hub.

Thumb sm
University of Amsterdam 05
Amsterdam, Netherlands
By Nicola Zolin
24 Mar 2015

Students listen to a lecture by French philosopher Jacques Rancière one month after the occupation of the Maagdenhuis, the University of Amsterdam's administrative hub.

Thumb sm
University of Amsterdam 06
Amsterdam, Netherlands
By Nicola Zolin
24 Mar 2015

Student protesters gather at the entrance of the occupied Maagdenhuis.

Frame 0004
Weapons Training for Pakistan Teachers
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
31 Jan 2015

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. Pakistani military retook control of the school after hours of fighting, saying that all nine insurgents were dead.

After the Peshawar school attack, the Pakistani government has decided to train school teachers to operate handguns, as well as Kalashnikov rifles, for their own safety and the protection of students.

Thumb sm
Heat
Sibuyan Island
By Ralf Falbe
18 Jan 2015

Women students protect their heads with umbrellas against the heat of the sun, Sibuyan Island, Philippines.

Frame 0004
Pakistan: Peshawar Army Public School...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
11 Jan 2015

Class is back in session at Peshawar's Army Public School, the target of a brutal attack by Taliban militants that killed 141 people in mid-December. Parents and their children were eager to tell media that despite the attacks, they are not afraid and that their children shouldn't have to live in fear in order to get an education. A ceremony was held as schools across Pakistan re-opened after an extended break in the wake of the attack.

Context:

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. This was the latest in a years-long string of attacks against Pakistani civilians and military and government institutions, starting with the alleged assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007. The Pakistani Taliban’s targeting of educational institutions, however, is not new, including an attack on a school bus in 2011, the attempt on the life of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai in 2012, and now the tragic killing of over a hundred students in the Peshawar school.

Frame 0004
Pakistan: Peshawar Army Public School...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
10 Jan 2015

Class is back in session at Peshawar's Army Public School, the target of a brutal attack by Taliban militants that killed 141 people in mid-December. Parents and their children were eager to tell media that despite the attacks, they are not afraid and that their children shouldn't have to live in fear in order to get an education. A ceremony was held as schools across Pakistan re-opened after an extended break in the wake of the attack.

Context:

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. This was the latest in a years-long string of attacks against Pakistani civilians and military and government institutions, starting with the alleged assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007. The Pakistani Taliban’s targeting of educational institutions, however, is not new, including an attack on a school bus in 2011, the attempt on the life of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai in 2012, and now the tragic killing of over a hundred students in the Peshawar school.

Frame 0004
Education Changes Under Syrian Opposi...
Aleppo
By mohammed alhadi
02 Dec 2014

November 2014
Taqad, Aleppo Province, Syria

Students in the rebel-controlled village of Taqad to the west of Aleppo no longer have to pay tribute to the Syrian regime.
In this village with a population of 11,000, public schools follow books issued by the interim government appointed by the opposition Syrian National Coalition.
The director of one the local schools says that the new curriculum “shifted from glorifying the regime to glorifying the homeland.”
References to Bath party’s ideology or the “achievements” of Presidents Bashar al-Assad and his father the late President Hafez al-Assad were omitted from the new books, which are printed in Turkey and opposition-held areas in Syria.
Schools in this little town, however, have other pressing needs to deal with. Teachers work in overcrowded classrooms and students sometimes ditch school when they hear the sound of warplane

Interviews

00:45 – 00:55
Interview with Abdel Karim Subhi, a second-grade student (Boy, Arabic)
"I am eight years old. Whenever the airplanes are flying, my brothers and I do not come. We wait for them to end their raids so we come to school.

01:02 – 01:30
Interview with Ahmad al-Deek, a pro-opposition education official in Aleppo province (Man, Arabic)
“Books did not undergo a radical change in their content, but some of their content was modified, especially the parts where the regime is sanctified. Only national educational was totally removed from the curriculum. The Syrian National Coalition is working on printing new books and distributing them in the liberated areas. We also stress on the importance of education as a basic necessity in life, whether under bombardment or not. Education is a weapon to confront the regime, and the answer towards a better Syria in the future.”

01:31 – 01:44
Interview with Rama Humaida, a seven-grade student (Girl, Arabic)
“My siblings and I come from a middle class family, and we come to school every day to learn. My favorite class is the one related to Religion, and I wish to be a religious studies instructor in the future.”

02:50 – 03:13
Interview with Ahmad Jumaa, the director of Qaddour al-Sayyed school (Man, Arabic)
“This is Qaddour al-Sayyed School for Girls. The school has five sections classes; there are 12 teachers, some of whom are volunteers. We were able to get the necessary supplies such as books and notebooks with the help of some organizations.”

03:14 – 03:31
Interview with Nour Qassem, a grade-seven student (Girl, Arabic)
“My siblings and I come from a poor family, and we come to school every day to learn. My favorite class is Arabic, and I wish to be an Arabic instructor in the future.”

03:33 – 03:48
Interview with Raed Abdu, a primary school teacher (Man, Arabic)
“Despite our difficult circumstances and continuous airstrikes, we started the new academic year. This year was different in terms of taught subjects, especially national education and history.”

04:32 – 04:42
Interview with Ahmad Jumaa, principal of Qaddour al-Sayyed school
“I am the director of the Qaddour al-Sayyed School. The Syrian National Coalition distributed new books to the schools but we had to print some of the missing books in the local print houses.”

04:49 – 05:16
Interview with Abdullah Jumaa, a local teacher (Man, Arabic)
“The books were modified according to the situation we are living in now. All the parts where Bashar al-Assad and his gang are sanctified were removed. The new books shifted from the glorification of the regime to the glorification of the entire homeland, and new parts were added that reflect the actual situation.”

Frame 0004
American University of Beirut
Beirut, Lebanon
By adrian
18 Nov 2014

Footage showing the building and the students of American University of Beirut.

Thumb sm
Weapons of Mass Obstruction - Hong Ko...
Hong Kong
By Gordon Arthur
30 Sep 2014

Hong Kong (01 October 2014) — Together, they resemble a Spartan phalanx. Every self-respecting protestor carries this weapon – usually concealed in a backpack or handbag – and he or she would not contemplate leaving home without it. It has been the weapon of choice for Hong Kong protestors calling for the democratic right of universal suffrage. Indeed, even sightseers with tunnel vision strolling through any of the several protest zones in Hong Kong would see this weapon in abundance. Arms dealers, generally in the guise of student activist groups, are blatantly hawking these instruments to all.

What is perhaps even more remarkable is that these weapons are being given away to normally peace-loving Hong Kong citizens free of charge. It has become a powerful and popular symbol representing the protest movement that has swept through Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region of China. The umbrella.

A humble artifact has become a potent weapon of mass obstruction in the streets of Hong Kong.

On 28 September, as thousands of disgruntled citizens took to the streets, protestors armed with umbrellas were out in full force. Umbrellas were swiftly put to good use as members of the Hong Kong Police wearing full riot gear and lining barricades surrounding the government headquarters in the city’s Admiralty district fired streams of pepper spray at a restless crowd. Even those not directly in the firing line unfurled their umbrellas just in case.

These simple but effective devices certainly proved their worth in this first round of clashes. Protestors took shelter behind their dome-shaped canopies and efficiently shielded themselves from the capsicum jets. Realizing just how potent these defensive weapons actually were, police officers made it their business to tear umbrellas from protestors’ hands, rendering them defenseless. Indeed, the police had soon amassed an impressive mound of damaged and mangled umbrellas. Cracked ribs, pierced canopies and bent shafts were spotted in several umbrella graveyards just behind the police line.

However, every weapon has its limitations. Even deftly wielded umbrellas proved no match for the volleys of teargas canisters fired by police that night. Instead, protestors resorted to other defensive weapons in their arsenals to combat the acrid and debilitating smoke – goggles, face-masks and cling-film.

Since that fateful first day, protestors have professed ongoing infatuation with their umbrellas, causing some to name this the “Umbrella Movement” or the “Umbrella Revolution.” As peace and calm returned to the occupied streets of Hong Kong, umbrellas were used to fend off the hot sun as protestors settled in for a long day of civil disobedience. On the last night of September, umbrellas also served admirably as thunderstorms and heavy rain lashed Hong Kong. The umbrella again proved its weight in aluminum and fabric as demonstrators sheltered themselves from the weather.

The pro-democracy sit-ins have taken on an almost carnival-like atmosphere. Thousands are content to sit in clusters on once busy roads, avenues upon which expensive European luxury cars belonging to tycoons normally rush between urgent appointments and lucrative deals. Now there are numerous stalls offering free water, free food and free umbrellas to all. As one student volunteer explained, the arrays of umbrellas of all sizes and colors were available to all, and they had all been donated anonymously.

The usual Chinese entrepreneurial spirit has been surpassed by an overwhelming sense of bonhomie and friendship. In fact, there is not one money-making stall to be found at the protest sites. Instead, students help people to clamber over roadblocks, while others spray cooling water on passers by. There is a genuine sense of purpose and friendship.

Ravin Wu and a group of friends started a roadside exhibition where people can express their feelings about the protests by writing messages on old squares of cardboard. By mid-afternoon of the first day, several hundred sympathizers had already laid out messages on the asphalt. On many of the messages were images of umbrellas. Ravin agreed that the umbrella is an apt icon. “It helps protect us,” he acknowledged.

Another remarkable thing about the protests is the environmental concern being displayed. There has been no wanton looting and sacking in this city. Rather, teams of young people go around and pick up rubbish before taking it back to a collection point for recycling. By the end of the third day, the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Association (HKEPA) had collected 100,000 plastic bottles for recycling.

Ricky Fan, the HKEPA’s chairman, revealed his non-governmental organization also recycles umbrellas. He disclosed some statistics that portray just how valuable the umbrella has been. However, these figures also reveal the lifespan of an umbrella is remarkably short. On the opening day, when police confronted demonstrators, some 1,600 battle-damaged umbrellas were collected for recycling. On day two there were 650, as remnants were cleared from the protest site. There were still 410 salvaged on the peaceful third day. Clearly, umbrellas are still being put to heavy use, even if not in confrontation.

Fan explained that aluminum parts of umbrellas will be recycled, while other components such as the canopies will be used by students for artwork and other such evocative uses. The trusty umbrella, this icon of the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement, has acquitted itself well so far.

Frame 0004
"Where Should We Go?": Gaza Refugees ...
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
18 Sep 2014

Footage Information
Location Palestine, Gaza Strip, Gaza city, Tal el Hawa, Mamlaket El Bahrin Prep. School (UNRWA)
Recording date 18,09,2014
Duration 00,05,25
Format MP4
Description
"With some families from Shejayya neighborhood, Om Mohammad has taken this school as a shelter since the last war against Gaza started in last July. She and her expanded family, which consists of 11 member including her old aged parants, evacuated their house soon after it had been dimolished by IDF artilary. All the family are staying in a 24 square meter class room. The class room is the only place where they can live now. ""We hope we people could help us return to our house... We don't have money to rent a house"", Om Mohammad says. On the other hand, Om Tamer stays with her five little children and her husband in a small room in the same school. She has delivered her baby as soon as she arrived the school in the begining of the last war. ""I do not think there will be a solution for our problem in the near future. They (UNRWA) asked as to leave the place and rent some house to stay in. We don't even have money to rent a house, I could not even secure milk poweder to feed my babies,"" Om Tamer says.
They are going to stay in the school until their house will be rebuilt. They don't have money to rent an apartment. ""Our condition is very hard. My husband and sons in addition to all other members of the family are unemployed"" Om Mohammad says. The family lives in a miserable conditions since they lost their house and did not get any promise to get their house rebuilt. In addition, they cannot stand living in the classroom as its space does not match their big families. As a result of displaced families’ existence, Al Bahrin school students are spread to other UNRWA schools to start the school year as well as other Gazan students who returned to school few days ago."
Shot list
From To Location Subject
00,00 00,05 School - interior Establishing shots
00,06 00,35 School - interior Daily life inside the school
00,36 00,48 Inside Om Mohammad's classroom Om Mohammad parants and her son asleep
00,49 01,03 Inside Om Mohammad's classroom Om Mohammad 's sister plays with her nephews
01,04 01,06 Inside Om Mohammad's classroom Om Mohammad’s mother
01,07 01,21 In front of Om Mohammad's classroom Om Mohammad hangs clothes
01,22 1,42 Inside Om Mohammad's classroom Om Mohammad with her family tides the classroom
01,43 01,59 In front of Om Mohammad's classroom Through the window, students in a sport class in a neighboring school
02,00 02,43 Inside Om Mohammad's classroom Om Mohammad's interview
02,44 02,50 Inside Om Mohammad's classroom Family kids play
02,51 02,58 Inside Om Mohammad's classroom Om Mohammad washes kitchenware
02,59 03,08 In front of Om Tamer's room Family kids
03,09 03,24 Inside Om Tamer's classroom Om Tamer tidys her room
03,25 04,30 Inside Om Tamer's classroom Om Tamer's interview
04,31 04,35 Inside Om Tamer's classroom Om Tamer with her babies
04,36 04,44 In front of Om Tamer's room Abu Tamer drinks tea
04,45 05,22 Insdie the school School's inhabitants bring water from watertanks downstairs

Thumb sm
North Korea in Black and White 017
By Ulrik Pedersen
05 Jun 2014

High school students walking together in Pyongyang. Pyongyang, North Korea.

Thumb sm
World Largest Dolma Feast in Erbil (1...
By Stefanos
03 May 2014

Children of Kawergosk Camp in Erbil! In Kawergoskm Camp living more than 15.000 Syrian Refugees. There are 1.600 children. In 3/5/14 Medes School of Erbil Organised an event with ''The Biggest Dolma Ever in World'' . They Organised this event to give food to Children of Kawergosk Camp (Syrian rrefugees). Here are two children after taking their Dolma...

Thumb sm
Clowns In Syrian Camps
By Younes Mohammad
23 Apr 2014

Darashakran Syrian Refugee camp,Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan: more than four hundreds of syrian refugees kid sit at group of their school and look at clowns performance during their show.
Three Clowns comes from CMSF From belgium they doing somethings funny in two days (24 & 25 April 2014) in this camp, around four hundred kids look at their show in each performance.

Frame 0004
Clashes Between Protesters and Police...
Cairo
By Mohamed Hisham
09 Apr 2014

Clashes at Cairo University between security forces and students protesting Monday's mass death sentence for 529 of Muslim Brotherhood supporters have left one student dead and eight injured, the health ministry reported on Wednesday.
The clashes began when the pro-Brotherhood students tried to move their protest from the university's campus to nearby Al-Nahda Square and were met by security forces, who forced the students back onto the campus, state-run TV reported.
The students shot fireworks at the police and pelted them with stones, state-run TV added.
Private TV channel CBC showed large groups of students running in the vicinity of the university campus and police moving to disperse students gathered in Al-Nahda Square – site of a protest camp for ousted president Mohamed Morsi that was violently cleared by security forces in August.
Brotherhood supporters had previously announced they would protest on Wednesday against the ruling of a court in Minya on Monday in which 529 persons loyal to ousted president Mohamed Morsi were given the death penalty on charges of killing a police officer, among others.
The verdict is expected to be appealed.
A security source told Al-Ahram's Arabic newspaper that groups of pro-Morsi students also protested on Wednesday at Zagazig University in Sharqiya governorate. Twelve people were wounded in clashes that ensued between supporting and opposing students.
The source said rioting students smashed the glass facade of the university's administration building and attacked a number of students and cars.
Police in Zagazig arrested eight rioters and brought the situation "under control," the security source added.

SHOTLIST:

1- Various shots of heavy teargas around the campus of Cairo University.
2- Medium shot of the ambulance.
3- Various shots of the security forces, firemen and ambulances.
4- Medium shot of firemen storm the students with water cannons.
5- Various shots of students and reporters running from teargas and fireworks.
6- Various shots of security forces and armored vehicles moving on.
7- Various shots of security forces storming the students with teargas.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 10
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Students affected by tear gas rest against a wall inside the Central University of Caracas.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 11
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Students hold their ground despite disproportionate firing of tear gas by the national police.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 12
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Students hold their ground despite disproportionate firing of tear gas by the national police.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 13
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

A suffocating student is attended to by volunteer medical personnel during protests on Wednesday.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 14
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Protesters affected by tear gas crouched down in an attempt to lessen the effects of airborne gas.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 15
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Students stand in front of a cloud of tear gas fired by national police outside Central University of Venezuela on Wednesday.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 16
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Students lean on the floor and walk away from tear gas fired by national police.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 17
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

A student covers his face with a piece of cloth to protect himself from tear gas fired by police.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 18
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

A female student wears a scarf to protect herself from tear gas fired by police.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 9
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

A female student cries while holding a Venezuelan flag upside down.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 8
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Protesters and news personnel lean against a wall to avoid airborne teargas canisters.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 7
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Students with gas masks and shirts over their faces get ready for tear gas fire from police.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 6
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Hundreds of students marched towards the Ombudsman's Office in Caracas to protest violation of rights during protests.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 5
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

A police officer gazes at student protesters in Caracas on Wednesday.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 4
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Hundreds of police officers lined up outside Central University of Venezuela to contain the students' march.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 3
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

An officer organizes police efforts to contain the march.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 2
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

A student holds a bullhorn to cheer fellow protesters.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas 1
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
12 Mar 2014

Students hold a banner during a march towards the Ombudsman's Office in Caracas.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Caracas
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
11 Mar 2014

A student march heading towards the Ombudsman's Office in Caracas to protest violation of rights was held back and dispersed with tear gas in the Central University of Venezuela by the Bolivarian National Police.

Frame 0004
Syrian Children Struggle in Lebanese ...
Tripoli
By Marwan Maalouf
07 Mar 2014

March 7, 2014
Tripoli, Lebanon

This short film illustrates the difficulties faced by Syrian teachers in Lebanon, trying to secure children’s educational rights in the context of the ongoing war. Over 350,000 Syrian children now find themselves seeking education in Lebanon. This has created a dilemma for Syrian teachers and parents that want their children to get a good education tailored to their own situation and background.

Thumb sm
Students Protest in Venezuela
By Carlos Hernandez
18 Feb 2014

Students go out to the streets to protest against the government in Caracas, Venezuela.

Thumb sm
Venezuela Student Protests
By Manaure Quintero
12 Feb 2014

In the protests that have turned violent in Venezuela, at least 10 people were killed and more than a hundred were injured, as thousands continue to take to the streets, asking the Venezuelan Government to release students who were detained during protests in San Cristobal City. People are demonstrating against the government's crackdown on dissent, restrictions of freedom of speech and the arrest of Leopoldo Lopez.

Thumb sm
Dormitory Life of Moscow (Collection)
Moscow
By Pascal Dumont
25 Jan 2014

Students come from different countries to study in Russia's universities and thus experience dormitory life.

Thumb sm
Ukrainian Protests 11
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

Inside of the tent of the anti-government protesters. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.

Thumb sm
Ukrainian Protests 10
Ukraine, Lviv
By Maciej Moskwa
06 Dec 2013

Inside the tent of the anti-government protesters. The camp functions 24/7 and students take shifts in running and guarding the camp and the press center.
Lviv, Ukraine.