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Dead Sea Mud Pack
Dead Sea
By Ralf Falbe
11 May 2015

Female tourist with mud pack on her face at the Dead Sea, Israel.

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Desert Waterfall
Dead Sea
By Ralf Falbe
10 May 2015

Israeli woman enjoy a cold shower in a waterfall in the desert by the Dead Sea, Israel.

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Israel Border Police
West Bank
By Ralf Falbe
09 May 2015

Israel Border Police in the West Bank, May 9, 2015.

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Dead Sea
Dead Sea
By Ralf Falbe
09 May 2015

Salty crust of the Dead Sea on the Israel-Jordan border. Due to climate change the Dead Sea is shrinking every year.

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Tribal Forces in Hadramawt Defy Houthis
Thamoud
By Amged Sabeeh
10 Apr 2015

April 10, 2014
Hadramawt, Yemen

Dozens of armed men from the Awamer clans paraded against the Houthis in Hawarem, a desert area in the southern Yemeni province of Hadramawt near the border with Saudi Arabia.
This video shows the tribesmen driving a convoy of pickup trucks and SUVs that carry the Awamer tribal flag in a desert area while brandishing rifles, machineguns and rocket-propelled grenade launchers. The men are then seen forming a circle and chanting, as well as shooting their weapons in the air.
The footage also includes an interview with Saleh al-Ameri, a leader of the Awamer clans, in which he declares his tribe’s solidarity with Gulf countries “against any aggression.”

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Saleh al-Ameri, A leader of the Awamer clans
07:48 – 08:47

“The Awamer tribes have gathered today. We met here in Hawarem in order to discuss what is going on in the country in general. We have expressed our willingness to adopt the position of the area’s tribes – the tribes in Hadramawt province – in order to defend the country against any aggression. In fact, the security of our country is related to the security of entire Yemen as well as neighboring countries. We, the people of Gulf countries, are prepared to fulfil our duty in defending our homeland. You have doubtless seen these gatherings that have come from everywhere to declare that they are united against any aggression or sabotage that could target our country. We are prepared to defend our homeland. Peace be upon you.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Tribal Fighter
08:47 – 08:57

The Awamer tribes have convened in the desert. God willing, we shall safeguard the security of the desert against any aggression. We shall push any aggression back, God willing.”

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Southern Tribal Fighters Unite to Fig...
Shabwah
By Amged Sabeeh
01 Apr 2015

Fighters of the Belobeid tribe proudly tout their guns and artillery in the southern Yemeni desert of Shabwah, an Al-Qaeda haven. Just as the Saudi-led coalition began bombing Houthis and loyalists to ousted president Ali Abdullah Saleh, hundreds of fighters from the Belobeid tribe began joining forces in the desert of the southern province to begin organizing a coordinated resistance against the Houthis.

In the past few months, the ongoing expansion of northern Yemen's Houthi rebels has prompted many tribes in the restive south to pull together. One man interviewed says they are fighting against both the Houthis and "terrorism" as such.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Unnamed Tribal fighter 1
01:01 – 01:04

“We are against Houthis and terrorism alike.” "We are against [UNINTELLIGIBLE] country"

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hassan Bahloul, Spokesperson of the Southern Revolutionary Movement in Hadramout
01:53 – 02:50

“Peace be upon the Prophet Mohamad and his honourable descendants. Today is the day of reunion in this historic area. Return to history, roots and authenticity.
We are gathered to unify the voice of all Belobeid clans. We confirm that that Belobeid are a solid bloc that shall not be broken.
Throughout history, we have preserved the security of our area [UNINTELLIGIBLE] al-Soda. We have preserved our security and safety against any kind of aggression. What is happening in Sanaa is their own conflict, we are not concerned with it in any manner here in the south. We have proved our presence. The security of Belobaid is equivalent to the security of the whole land of the south, from Mahra to Bab al-Mandab [UNINTELLIGIBLE]."

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Trench Shields Shiite Iraqi Province ...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
27 Mar 2015

Karabala, Iraq
March 27, 2015

A trench is being dug on the border of the southern Shiite-majority Iraqi province of Karbala with the provinces of al-Anbar and Babel. The ditch, which extends for 50km, is 6m deep and 10m wide and is guarded by surveillance towers and checkpoints manned by Iraqi government forces and a Shiite militia known as the Al-Abbas Combat Division.

Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, the commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade in the Iraqi army, said in an interview that this trench aims to keep ISIS fighters from entering Karbala from al-Anbar province. Silawi denied that this obstacle was conceived to separate Sunni and Shiite populations.

Another interviewed officer denied claims made by Sunni politicians that the aim of the trench was to annex territory to the province Karbala. The city of Karbala hosts the tomb of Imam Hussein, one of the holiest shrines for Shiite Muslims.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide of soldiers standing next to surveillance tower
Wide of trench
Various of soldiers guarding trench
Wide of Iraqi army Humvee and soldier
Wide of soldiers running on sand barrier
Interview with Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
Wide of soldiers next to sand barricade
Various of soldier manning machinegun behind sand barricade
Various of soldiers guarding trench
Various of soldiers and military vehicles next to sand barricade
Interview with Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
Various of soldiers and military vehicles
Wide of pickup truck moving and banner with Shiite religious symbols
Wide of tents and Iraqi flags
Interview with Major Jaber Ahmed, Infantry Platoon Commander
Various of trench
Various of soldier in surveillance tower looking through binoculars
Wide of soldiers and vehicles at checkpoint. Phrase written with bricks in Arabic reads: “Long live Iraq.”
Wide of solider next to Iraqi flag
Wide of Iraqi soldier on guard

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
01:18 – 02:50

“The trench extends for about 50km along the administrative border between the provinces of Babel and Karbala. No, it is not about Sunni or Shiite provinces. This trench is an obstacle set up for military purposes. It has nothing to do with whether an area is Sunni or Shiite. This is a desert. These lands do not belong to any individual; they belong to the Ministry of Agriculture.

"The trench will be guarded by platoons from the 33rd Infantry Brigade in addition to groups from the Popular Mobilization [Shiite militia umbrella], especially the Al-Abbas Combat Division. The trench was dug by the province of the holy Karbala in agreement with the local governments of neighboring provinces. This system involves surveillance towers and cameras, as well as a dirt barrier that is 5m high and 6m wide.

"This trench was dug in the desert – an unpopulated area. There are no agricultural areas or shepherds. This is a desert, barren land. The aim of digging the trench is to stop the terrorist ISIS organization from training in this area.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
04:00- 04:48

"The soldiers are not scared because it is their duty to fight. We are terrorizing ISIS; ISIS is scared of us. The proof is that we liberated areas with the support of the Popular Mobilizations forces. This is a border of separation in desert areas neighboring the province of Karbala. The trench goes along the administrative border of three regions – Babel, Ramadi and the province of Karbala.

"There is no transgression. There is an agreement among local governments. This [trench] serves all the provinces. The public interest comes ahead of everything, especially when it comes to security. There are no lands that belong to the state or agricultural land, either. It is a desert area."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Major Jaber Ahmed, Infantry Platoon Commander
05:12 – 05:51

“Thanks be to God, so far no security breach has been recorded in this district. Thanks be to God, it was because of the efforts of the head of operations, the commander of the 33rd Brigade."

Interviewer: "How would describe your morale?"

"Our morale is very high, thanks to [the military commanders]. God willing, the operations to liberate Falluja, which is close to us, as well as Tikrit, have started. God willing, operations will also start within Al-Anbar. God willing, the operations will keep going. We are guarding the northern district of the province of Karbala. Our morale is high, thanks be to God.”

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A Biodiversity Odyssey (EN)
Worldwide
By Conteur d'images
06 Mar 2015

To celebrate the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020, an environmentalist and a photojournalist visited 10 countries in 300 days in order to discover the most innovative solutions implemented by the peoples of the world to preserve the biodiversity of our planet. A fabulous educational journey through the Amazon, the Arabian desert, the Andes, the Pacific Ocean and more!

TEXTLESS, NATURAL SOUND VERSION / CONFORMED DIALOGUES AVAILABLE ON REQUEST.

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Morocco's Tree of Life 17
Essaouira, Morocco
By Gemima Harvey
20 Feb 2015

Argan oil has a multitude of uses: it can be drizzled over salads, cous cous and tagines to add a nutty taste, applied as a scar healing, skin rejuvenating, nail strengthening and hair vitality treatment and used medicinally as an anti-inflammatory and to aid with immunity and blood circulation.

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Morocco's Tree of Life 15
Essaouira, Morocco
By Gemima Harvey
20 Feb 2015

Argan oil has a multitude of uses: it can be drizzled over salads, cous cous and tagines to add a nutty taste, applied as a scar healing, skin rejuvenating, nail strengthening and hair vitality treatment and used medicinally as an anti-inflammatory and to aid with immunity and blood circulation.

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Morocco's Tree of Life 16
Essaouira, Morocco
By Gemima Harvey
20 Feb 2015

Argan oil has a multitude of uses: it can be drizzled over salads, cous cous and tagines to add a nutty taste, applied as a scar healing, skin rejuvenating, nail strengthening and hair vitality treatment and used medicinally as an anti-inflammatory and to aid with immunity and blood circulation.

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Sunni Tribesmen Guard Their Borders A...
Shabwa
By Dhaifallah Homran
19 Feb 2015

February 19, 2015
Shabwa, Yemen

Sunni tribesmen, belonging to the Markha al-Alya tribe of the southern Yemeni province of Shabwa, announced today that they are closing their border with the neighboring al-Baydaa province. Situated to the west of Shabwa, al-Baydaa has been the scene of fierce battles between the Houthis and local tribesmen, who are trying to prevent the Houthis from advancing south.

In their announcement the Markha al-Alya tribe emphatically rejected the constitutional declaration of the Houthis and banned any military group from entering Shabwa. They have positioned their fighters along the border and installed sentries on the Farsha passage, the road which connects the neighboring provinces.

The tribesmen assured that they will defend their land to the death and not allow it to become a thoroughfare for Houthis and other armed groups to transport their soldiers and weapons. They are working in conjunction with the local authorities who support their mission to defend Shabwa.

Transcript

Soundbite Sheikh Monser Salem al-Kabali, Tribal Leader (Man, Arabic)

"Based on the agreement among the tribe leaders, dignitaries and local authorities, we announce that we refuse the constitutional declaration made by the Houthis. We support the constitutionally legitimate authorities and will not accept any agreement outside the consensus among political powers in Yemen. Our stance regarding the Shabwa province follows that of the governor. It is guided by the governor of Shabwa as well as the security committee and the tribes in Shabwa and the regions of Hadramoot and Muhar al-Shabwa. We will stand against anyone who wants to use our province as a gate for chaos, whether they are armed militias, tribes or [any other] groups. We declare our support of the local authorities in the province in their bid to protect Shabwa borders from all directions."

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Tribes of Marib Prepare for War and A...
Ma'rib
By MENA Desk
02 Feb 2015

Ma’rib, Yemen
February 1, 2015

Tribesmen in the predominantly Sunni area of Ma’rib, east of Sanaa, prepare for war with the Houthis and threaten to create their own autonomous state within Yemen. The tribal fighters have installed checkpoints, known as “matarih”, in the middle and around the perimeter of Ma’rib. In local tradition this act is considered as the highest possible security precaution, putting local tribal disagreements to one side. The “matarih” is enforced by fighters patrolling the area in heavily armed convoys and setting up fixed bases in tents. This precaution may last days, months or even years.
The tribal elders believe that the drums of war have been beating ever since Houthi militants took over the capital Sanaa and forced the president to resign. Abdullah bin Jaradan, a prominent tribal leader, says that they will not recognize the Houthis as legitimate rulers of Yemen and they will not put down their guns unless president Hadi is restored to office.
In order to prevent a Houthi takeover in the oil-rich province of Ma’rib, the elders have assembled a fighting force to defend their lands and resources.
Ma’rib is considered an area of great strategic importance due to its oil fields. It produces around 25,000 barrels per day.

Transcription:

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Hamad Bin Waheet
(01:08 – 02:27)

01:08
“We were mobilized on the first day [of the events] in order to protect the province of Marib, so that it would not be invaded by the Houthis like they invaded the province of Omran and Sanaa. We are still ready and prepared for anything. We are on alert on the road of Farda –Sanaa- Marib; the road from Sirwah to Marib; and the road from [Beit] Mrad to Marib. All the tribes have taken positions along these three lines. “

01:36
“We have had weapons for a long time, not today. We have had weapons before the Houthis entered Omran or other provinces, such as al-Jawf. Tribes have all sorts of weapons. Each tribe represents [is as strong as] a state. Each of Yemen’s tribes has weapons and men, as well as God on their side. “

02:01
“We have a number of 23 mm and 14 mm machine guns; mortars; 50 mm machine guns; rifles; and we have 22 mm and 83 mm mortars. All tribes have this kind of weapons. Most tribes have had these weapons before and acquired them during wars among tribes. However, thanks be to God, there are no more wars among tribes, except for the fight against the Houthis.“

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abdullah bin Jardan

02:54
“If God willed it and the state collapsed, we will protect the oil and form a confederate region of Sabaa. We will act like an independent region.”

03:34
“This depends on the consultations in Sanaa. There is a lot pressure on the president to rescind his resignation; however, we have to take everything into account. The regions of Sabaa and Marib have all the wealth, whether he [the president] returns or not. “

04:06
“We were not satisfied with administration in the previous era, but it was a transitory period. But the Houthis carried out a coup d’état. We were not completely satisfied with the performance of the president and the government.”

04:25
“Now there are regional and sectarian divisions and there might be a regional and sectarian war if the country collapsed, God forbid.”

04:42
“We demand the establishment of a fair state, which would rule Yemen with equality and allows for a partnership. Afterwards, the Yemeni people in general could surrender its weapons.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, man) Awad bin Ma’ili

05:13
“This is the result of our own efforts, thanks be to God. We are gathering whatever we can, like the squads you can see now. This is the effort of each person as well as ours. We are buying heavy and light weapons, depending on what we can acquire.”

05:38
“We are tribes, and tribes are known in Yemen. Each tribe has several [weapons], bought with private money. They are used to stand against whoever wants to invade our country.”

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon

December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, woman) Siham Jumaa

(00:07) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport (00:13).

(00:14) When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now (00:28).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Skype between Palestinian refugee Ibrahim al-Khatib and a people smuggler in Sudan.

(00:29) We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous (00:34).

(00:36) You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there is not any other road (00:59).

(01:00) We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy (01:07).

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon
December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets
2 Various of children
3 Various of woman at home
4 Various of children playing in the street
5 C/S of Yasser Arafat’s photos on camp wall
6 M/S of streets in camps
7 Various of streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Lama Baqlouni

(00:41) This is my son Mustafa, he is 15 years old. He is imprisoned in Egypt now. And this is my daughter Nisrine, she is also detained with her brother in Egypt (00:57).

(00:58) My children are orphans now, their father died. We need someone to help them get out of prison. It has been two months, they are tired and sick. We need someone to help them move to another country so they can continue their lives as normal people (01:15).

(01:17) We left Lebanon to Homs where I got a smuggler’s number. I called him and he told me to take them to Hama with $250 for each. We went to Hama and paid the amount needed, and then he took them to Turkey, where they stayed in a hotel. We got the contacts of smugglers who will be able to take them to Italy. The fees ranged between $5,000 and $6,000 for each child, depending on the smuggler. We asked people for money – people we knew and others that we did not. They took them to the Turkish coasts to be transported to Italy, and made them wait from 7PM to 1AM (02:15).

(02:18) They were supposed to take them first in a small boat, and then move them to a bigger ship. They were stopped by the coast guards and imprisoned in Turkey for a day, on condition to make them sign a pledge that they will never get out of Turkey again. They were freed the next day. On the same day they got out of jail, the smuggler said they will try to leave Turkey one more time. They got on board on the same day, but the captain kept going in circles in the sea for five days (02:59).

(03:10) They arrived to an island and the captain ordered them to leave the boat. They did not agree at first, but he told them he will get them accommodations in Egypt, and they were threatened by guns and knives. My daughter told me that they got very scared. Everybody started to scream, and they threw four men in the sea (03:27).

(03:35) Syrians were sent back to Turkey but Palestinians were allowed to go there (03: 39).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Siham Jumaa

(04:07) This is my husband’s passport, he sent it to the smuggler to get a visitor’s visa to Sudan (04:16).

(04:32) We lost our house and everything because of the war in Syria. Life is hard here in Lebanon, we should pay a monthly rent for our house and life is expensive. This is the main reason why my husband decided to do this trip, and if I had money, I would do the same thing (04:49).

(04:52) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport. He travelled to Dubai first and then to Sudan. When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now. His plan was to go to Italy after Libya, either from the coasts of Benghazi or Tripoli. He paid $4,000 for the whole trip from Beirut to Italy. But I heard nothing from him since he got to Libya (05:58).

(06:05) I do not have money. I sold all my jewelry and my wedding ring, and I even had to beg for money from people so we can get the 3000USD for his trip. Once he arrived to Libya, his brothers donated 1000USD for his trip. The whole trip cost $4,000 (06:21).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Skype conversion between Ibrahim al-Khatib and smuggler based in Sudan

(07:18) Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to travel. Smuggler: Welcome, I will help you
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Can I please know what the process is? I am a Syrian Palestinian, and I am in Lebanon.
Smugglers: Where would you like to go?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to go to Europe; I want to know the procedures, and how much it costs. This is the most important thing. We have no money and I have to borrow money if I want to travel. You have to give me discount and help me, please.
Smuggler: The person who told you about me, did he not tell you where I can take you?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: The person who told me about you went to Sudan. He went from Sudan to Libya and then to Italy.
Smuggler: Are you seriously intending to do it?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I am, I am asking about the expenses because I have a wife and children and I want to know [how much money] I should leave for them and how much to take with me, I want to know about the road, if it is safe, or not, and how this whole thing is going to be arranged. I want to know how I am going to give you the money, or my passport. Will I receive a visa, or not? I do not want to go without knowing anything.
Smuggler: We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous. You will go from [Lebanon] to Sudan - the road is easy - but from Sudan to Libya, we have five days in the desert. You have to think of all the odds, the desert is more dangerous than the sea. The sea is also unstable, but we can go across it and count on God to help us.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is your name?
Smuggler: I am Abu Yehya.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What I want to know is that, if I decide to go to Sudan, how will you get me the visa? Is it an invitation, or a visa, how can I guarantee that the process will go as agreed?
Smuggler: You will get a regular visa, and you should not be concerned with how you receive it – you will have it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that some people are being fooled and they are getting visas that do not work. Is that true of is it lying? Can I be sure that it will work?
Smuggler: It is not true, the trip to Sudan is fully legitimate, and you can make sure yourself.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about the cost?
Smuggler: Concerning the cost, the visa alone will cost you $1,500 and you have to pay for the plane ticket. From Sudan to Libya it will cost you $1,800. The trip from Sudan to Italy will cost you $3,200.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that from Libya to Italy, it costs $2,200, why do you charge $3,200? Is it more expensive now?
Smuggler: We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, now I understand. Will I have to cross the desert from Sudan to Libya?
Smuggler: Yes, the only road we have is through the desert. You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there isn’t any other road.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about Turkey, do you know anyone there?
Smuggler: Yes, I do. Syrian-Palestinians are not allowed to travel to Turkey, but we can arrange something. However, the trip to Turkey will cost you 10,000 euros.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is the process?
Smuggler: We can travel by sea, on plane or by bus.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Is there a way to go to Turkey from Lebanon, through the sea?

Smuggler: No, not at all, everyone used to say that they can go from Lebanon, but it is not possible. And I am not even in Lebanon, I am in Sudan.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I can see that you have a Sudanese number.

Smuggler: Yes, that is right, and I heard about many people who got caught while being smuggled out of Lebanon. If you are determined to go, send me a copy of your passport and $1,000 and you will give me the rest of the money when you get there.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Since I do not know you and you do not know me, how can I guarantee that you will not take the money and disappear? I want some sort of a guarantee.
Smuggler: I might send people to meet you, but at the end this is your choice; this how it is done, you chose either to do it or not. Many others have done it and if someone is afraid, then it would be better he did not do it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I wanted to ask about the procedure, and I am intending to go, I just have to figure out how to get the money, because it is available.
Smuggler: You can contact me if you want and we will make an agreement.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Some people are getting caught in Turkey. They are reaching an area in the middle of the sea, and then they are being handed over to the Egyptian police. We heard about a few Syrian-Palestinians who are now imprisoned in Egypt.

You said that through the desert, whatever happens, you cannot be held responsible. But what about going by the sea? How can you be sure about what might happen? Smugglers themselves handed people over to the Egyptian police.
Smuggler: You have to consider the fact that you are going to be smuggled, and you are not traveling legally. You have to keep in mind all the troubles that can happen. You are not going legally, we are smuggling you. I am not trying to scare you, most of the people that we smuggled have made it there, unless if the person was unlucky – this is something else.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Just as you are telling me that some people reached safely, I heard of other who drowned, women and children died.
Smuggler: Are you interrogating me or what?

Ibrahim al-Khatib: No, I am not interrogating you; do not get me wrong, but I am paying money and I am traveling with my family. I want to guarantee my safety.
Smuggler: Let me tell you something; if you want to leave, count on God, and leave. But if you keep telling me that this happened to those people and you will keep thinking of that, you will never travel. If you will keep thinking in a negative way, stay in Lebanon.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: My whole point is that I am going with my family, if something happens to me, it will be fine, I will manage, but my wife and children would not be able to survive.
Smuggler: count on God, God will have mercy on them.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, I will contact you again when I get the money, and think more about it. I am sorry for taking too much of your time. Thank you
Smuggler: No problem, you are welcome.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 07
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school of Khan Al-Ahmar has classes from grades 1 to 9. Children from five different Bedouin communities attend classes there. Every year, their number grows. There were 120 children for the 2013-2014 school year. In September 2014, 146 came to register.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 08
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class for 3rd grade children. All the children are eager to learn. They want to keep studying after the 9th grade, and often want to become doctor or lawyers because there are no medical or legal services in their community. While medical services are a basic essential for any community, legal services are significant to the West Bank Bedouin because they need lawyers to help them battle eviction orders from Israeli courts and the Israeli Army.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 01
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014.
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine.

Teachers run in the rain between their classrooms and the "teachers room" to bring handouts for their students.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 10
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children in the 8th grade studying, with the shape of the tires appearing in the wall. The goal of many of the students is often to enter into a profession that is not represented in their community, like medical or legal.

Every year the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the demolition of the institution. So far, they have managed to avoid a final demolition, but the orders remain, and it is uncertain how much longer the school will remain.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 13
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Every time it rains, the classrooms get wet and humid, and the water leaks into where the students sit. There is also no heater for the cold winter of the desert.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 11
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Harema Zhaeqq is the headmaster of the school. She is highly respected by the teachers, as they say that she is always able to find the necessary furniture for the classes, by canvassing companies in Palestine and abroad. Some companies in Palestine are hesitant to donate, because they fear sanctions from Israel. However, Ms. Zhaeqq is usually able to convince them anyway. Here, she stands beside the supplies for science classes.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 05
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Two young girls are go to class amidst murals used to add color to the otherwise mundane surroundings.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 03
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children have to buy their notebooks and school supplies themselves. However, when a family is too poor to pay for school supplies, the teachers gather money to cover the child's expenses.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 02
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Recreation time at the school. A young boy strikes a pose for the camera.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 14
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school playground for the Bedouin children of Khan Al-Ahmar is built of tires, mud, and other scrap materials.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 06
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Signs are made visible outside of the classrooms to thank the public sponsors of the school. While thankful for the funds, the headmaster pointed out that funds are limited and they only receive funds from the European Union and Italy.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The men of Al Araqib pray. They say they want a normal life, and they just want to make their area beautiful. "The government just wants to gather the maximum of Arabs in the minimum of land. But we have our history here. We won't leave".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The cemetery area of Al Turi is empty of animals. The Bedouins there only own 3 horses and a few ducks and chickens. They used to have sheep and camels. The sheep have been killed and the camels confiscated. Once, a camel caused a car accident. Since then, as soon as the soldiers see a camel in the desert, they take it and bring it to a "camel farm" that they have opened. They keep the camel there one month and send us the bill for the food and care. If we cannot pay after this month, the camel is lost forever. And they then sell us the camel milk that we love so much.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally:

"Before Israel chased us away, we worked, cultivated our land, had sheep, chickens, vegetables, trees. Our home was very simple, but we had everything, including a kitchen and toilets. Today we have nothing, we cannot take a shower everyday. They made the area and our homes illegal. Because Israel says our way of life is not normal. I asked [the Israelis], how can I make my home legal? [They had] no answer."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The entrance of Al Turi cemetary in Al Araqib. 22 families used to live here. Since July 27th, 2010, the " Black Day" as the Bedouins call it, only 12 people are still living in Al Araqib, confined in the graveyard. The "Black Day" is the day where the village was totally demolished by the Israeli army. They came at 4am, destroyed 65 houses, uprooted 4.500 olive trees and 700 fruit trees and killed dozens of chickens.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Maryam is the dean of Al Araqib. She has suffered all kinds of harassment since 1948 at the hands of the Israeli army and various Zionist gangs. In her lifetime, Israeli authorities or vigilanties have destroyed or vandalized her home and land more than 70 times (33 of those raids took place after 2010).

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba plays with her daughter Araqib before she begins cooking dinner. Saba says: "I do nothing during the day except watching to see if the police or soldiers are coming so I can hide everything that wouldn't be already hidden among the graves".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The last time the army came to Al Araqib's cemetery was October 14, 2014. They took fridges and cars. Now the men live under the trees and sleep in the 2 cars that are left.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba lives in the graveyard with her husband, daughter, brothers, sisters, and grand-mother. Everyday, she hides all of their belongings among the graves to prevent the soldiers from confiscating them. Then, when night comes, she goes to take the carpets and blankets so the family can sleep.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The three youngest children of Al Araqib from left to right: Araqib (2 1/2), Mohamed (14) and Khaled (12). Mohamed and Khaled go by foot to school everyday in the recognized Bedouin village of Rahat.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

On July 12th, 2014, after the Israeli army came and destroyed everything around the graveyard, they set up a military zone in the Negev, not far from Al Araqib. Police and army were present 24/7.

In September, the police left. Aziz, the chief of the village describes the current situation:

"They still come from time to time, look at what's happening and leave. Sometimes, they destroy something, took our clothes, blankets, carpets and any personal belonging."

Tents and Tombstones: Bedouins in Isr...
Al-Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
10 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014
al-Araqib, Israel

Al Araqib is one of the 46 Bedouin villages in the Negev desert that the state of Israel refuses to recognize. The residents of the village, both past and present, inherited these lands from their fathers and grandfathers. Harassment from the Israeli Army and vigilanties has become commonplace for the Araqib Bedouin. The harassment dates back to 1948, when a gang of Zionist militants rounded up 14 Bedouin men working in a field in al-Araqib and summarily executed them. Since 1948, homes and properties in al-Araqib have been regularly destroyed and stolen. On July 27th, 2010, the village was totally demolished. Since then, the village has been re-built and destroyed 33 times. However, many residents were unable to stay and moved to the recognized village of Rahat. Those who did choose to stay are confined to the area of the Al-Turi cemetary and have been living under harsh conditions, always scared of an unexpected visit from the soldiers.

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Eritrean in sinai desert.
egypt
By Mohammed El Akhrasy
10 Oct 2013

Video about : siffering of eritrean refugees in sainai