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Greek Parliament
Athens
By Nicola Zolin
13 Jul 2015

Greek Parliament Debates Debt Crisis

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"

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Yemenis Block-off Main Roads and Burn...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
30 Jul 2014

July 30, 2014
Sana'a, Yemen

Hundreds of Yemenis blocked off main roads and burned tires, in a number of Yemeni provinces, in protest against the latest price-hike of petroleum products, which came into effect on the third day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

On Wednesday morning the prices of fuel had increased from 2,500 to 4,000 Yemeni riyals ($11.6 to $18.6) for 20 liters. The price of diesel also increased from 2000 to 3,900 riyals.
Yemen is considered to be the poorest country in the Middle East with nearly half of its population living in severe poverty.

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The Greek return to the land
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

"Reverse mobility", says Kasimis Charalambos, specialist of the Greek rural world, when asked about the current movement of "return to the land" that turns thousands of Greek city-dwellers into farmers or olive producers. Since the end of the civil war in 1949, the Greek rural world experienced an exodus and Athens, a once 200.000 inhabitant's city, now gathers almost half of the 11,23 million's national population. "A tool of resilience against the crisis", adds Karina Benessaiah, who writes a Phd on the issue. Indeed, since the beginning of the financial crisis in 2008, more than 600 000 jobs were destroyed in the country, mainly in Athens, where unemployment, combined with increased taxes and raising daily costs, turned life into a never-ending nightmare. Suicide rate have dangerously increased and the Neo-nazi party Golden Dawn, whose members are whether in jail or in trial, is the third party of the capital, since the municipal elections that were held in May. "I want to leave the city to be free and human again", endeavors Giorgia, unemployed for 2 years, from a piece of land located in Nea Makri and owned by the collective Nea Guinea, which provides trainings to city-dwellers eager to live a sustainable and self-managed life. "This field, at a one-hour-distance from Athens, is a bridge between Athenians and the rural world, a laboratory to succeed in the hard process of going back to working and living of the land", explains Fotini, founder of Nea Guinea, who will move in Nea Makri for good in September. For Dimitris and Penelope, Athens is already an old souvenir. They swapped their urban lifestyle in the beginning of the crisis for the tough adventure of the rural world in Pelion, at five-hours-distance from Athens. In spite of many sacrifices and efforts, they are happy to live among olives, apple trees, homeopathic plants and wild pigs. For them, more than an economic opportunity, returning to the land was also a way to live a more sustainable life and to take their distance with the Greek political system that they find illegitimate. Agriculture may be a tool of resilience, but it will not be enough to solve the economic crisis, in a country where more than half of the youth is unemployed.

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The Greek return to the land 08
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

Back in her house, Penelope picks some Malva, let her chicken out from his house, in the back of the garden. A big dog is at the entrance, "vital to chase wild pigs", she precises. "For one year, we lived here with a friend without water and electricity. Now things are easier. But my friends are still scared to visit, because they are scared of loosing the confort of the city. Still, when I go back to Athens, every body tells me how he envies me and which he could do it. So why don't they do it?!"

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The Greek return to the land 09
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

"The return to the land is positive in the short term; life is easier and cheaper in the province than in Athens, and cultivating the land is a proactive way to react to the loss of a job or the closure of a company. But on the long term, it is not clear yet if people will manage to earn a living with that", confesses Karina Benessaiah. Penelope does not look for benefits. For her, the return to the land must go with a renewed economic system. "I swap my creams and oils against services with the local community. And I sell my fruits and vegetables in an independant market in Volos, the nearest big city, that was created by an anarchist squat for ecological producers. But here, I don't need a lot to live."

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The Greek return to the land 11
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

For 20 years, Giorgia worked as a secretary in a law office. Unemployed for two years, she only finds offers to work for 400€/month, 6 days on 7. "As an unemployed, I even have to pay charges to the State, and I don't receive anything. We feel like thieves, as if we would have to pay back something we robbed. But the only who robbed were the banks!", she denounces. Recently, the Greek vice-minister of Justice brought in a bill proposing to lock up until one year in jail any citizen who would not be able to pay a debt over 5000 euros to the Greek State after 4 months. "Nea Guinea is our way to do the revolution against the system of austerity and neoliberalism. But instead of fighting against police like the anarchists, we do concrete and everyday actions. From housing to energy, health to food, we propose to the Athenians an alternative, sustainable and self-managed way to live, without having debts to pay to a State that we don't trust anymore", abounds Fotini.

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Elderly Care in Thailand: Luxury at a...
Phuket
By Biel Calderon
31 May 2014

Elderly care has been one of the sectors affected by the global economic crisis in Europe. Many retired people cannot afford to pay for the services they require. Countries like Thailand have seen this dilemma as an opportunity to offer these services at a lower price. In Phuket, one of the main tourist towns in Thailand, a Swiss woman has opened a caring house, the Baan Tschuai Duu Laa (House of Help and Care), which hosts elderly from Switzerland, Germany and the United States. The residents of the care home now enjoy better care at a much lower price than their home countries.

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Economic Crisis in Damascus
Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
14 Aug 2013

Due to the displacement of the roads and the large scale economic crisis in the country, the prices of goods and services has increased drastically, resulting in a decrease in consumerism and trade.

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The Syrian Living Condition During Ra...
Syria
By yaceen saeb
04 Aug 2013

Syria: the living conditions of citizens and the poor economic situation during the days of Ramadan

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Viome 13
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

"The politicians don't want the self-management, because unemployment and crisis are often useful for low wages and foreing investors", said a worker during a break.

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Viome 17
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

After bankrupt, workers decide to occupy the factory and then to self-organize the production. Now they produce cleaning products.

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Viome 2
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

In February 2012, after the occupation of the factory, the workers started a new self-management production, selling cleaning products and trying to expand their experience in other factories in Greece.

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Viome 11
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

In June 2013, Naomi Klein visited the Viome factory as an experiment of social redistribution from the botton. Actually there is no owner of the factory, just the general assembly makes decisions.

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Viome 22
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

“No worker who is not a shareholder, no shareholder who is not a worker,” say the workers of VIOME

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Viome 4
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

A worker during a break in Viome.

Through a formal proposal dating from October 2011 they have been claiming the establishment of a workers' cooperative under full workers’ control, demanding legal recognition for their own workers’ cooperative, as well as for all the others to follow.
Thessaloniki, 29.05.2013

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
14 Apr 2013

A member of the " I Don't Pay" movement reconnects the electricity to the home of the unemployed tenant.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
02 Apr 2013

A demonstrator with the " I Don't Pay" movement flag.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
01 Apr 2013

An "I Don't Pay'" movement member hangs a flag on a column.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
01 Apr 2013

Members of the " I Don't Pay" movement protest against gold mining in Halkidiki.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
01 Apr 2013

Members of "I Don't Pay" movement demonstrate in front of Greek Electricity provider DEI as electricity bills continue to increase.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Auster...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
01 Apr 2013

Mr Vasilis Papadopoulos, a representative of the
"I Don't Pay" movement, speaks of the party's future plans against the new austerity measures in Greece.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
01 Apr 2013

Members of the '" Don't Pay" movement march through the streets of Korinthos carrying yellow
flag's bearing the party's logo.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
31 Mar 2013

A member of the "I Don't Pay" movement helps reconnect the electricity in a family's home. Their electricity was cut because they could not pay the bill.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
31 Mar 2013

Members of the "I Dont Pay" movement are seen marching through the streets of Athens.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
31 Mar 2013

A donation box with the "I Dont Pay" movement's logo depicting the resistance to the austerity measures in Greece.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
31 Mar 2013

Members of the '" I Don't Pay'" movement are seen opening toll booths in the Zevgolatio region of Greece allowing cars to pass without paying the toll fee.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
31 Mar 2013

Members of the "I Don't Pay" movement pass through Omonoia square.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
31 Mar 2013

The '"I Don't Pay" movement stated it will continue to oppose future austerity measures imposed by the Greek goverment and the IMF.

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"I Don't Pay Movement", Greek Austeri...
Athens,Greece
By giorgos33
31 Mar 2013

The '"I Don't Pay" movement stated it will continue to oppose future austerity measures imposed by the Greek government and the IMF.

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Saving the Egyptian economy conferenc...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
24 Feb 2013

Story: Saving the Egyptian economy conference in Cairo

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: February 23, 2013
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: February 23, 2013
Length: 0:01:45
Video Size: 86.8 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Pan left shot of the banner of the conference of saving the Egyptian economy
  2. Medium of the speakers heading to start the conference
  3. Wide shot of the conference
  4. Medium shot of head of Egypt’s Ghad Al-Thawra Party, Ayman Nour
  5. Medium shot of Hassan Rateb, Egyptian businessman speaking during the conference `
  6. Medium shot of attendees during the conference
  7. Medium shot of Ex-presidential Adviser Salafi Dr. Khaled Alam El-Din speaking during the conference
  8. Medium shot of attendees during the conference
  9. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Ex-presidential Adviser Salafi Dr. Khaled Alam El-Din:
    “All our people hold us a great responsibility that requires from us to unite, cooperate and leave all our political disputes in order to save the Egyptian economy which we all recognize its deteriorating state.”
  10. Various shots of the conference
  11. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - head of Egypt’s Ghad Al-Thawra Party, Ayman Nour:
    “We have to think in the interests of Egypt away from all political disputes. We have to think in how to save Egypt and its revolution which some people believe that it is the reason behind their deteriorating state. Egypt still has wise and honorable people who are able to direct their efforts to save the Egyptian economy.”
  12. Various shots of the conference

STORYLINE:

Egypt’s liberal opposition Ghad Al-Thawra Party in cooperation with Salafist Nour Party and Faculty of Commerce held a meeting on Saturday, February 23 dubbed “Saving the Egyptian economy”.

Ex-presidential Adviser Salafi Dr. Khaled Alam El-Din said during his opening speech that the Egyptian economy crisis affects every child, woman, family breadwinner and even unemployed youth, adding that the deteriorating state of the economy is obvious to everyone.

Alam El-Din added that Nour Party seeks to bring future economic vision based on the green economy and investment in the fields of waste recycling, the creation of biofuels, protectorates protection projects, and the use of wastewater in agriculture forest wood.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Ex-presidential Adviser Salafi Dr. Khaled Alam El-Din:
“All our people hold us a great responsibility that requires from us to unite, cooperate and leave all our political disputes in order to save the Egyptian economy which we all recognize its deteriorating state.”

They also aim to offer a forward looking strategy towards securing a better future for the Egyptian economy.

He stressed that all Egypt’s political forces should unite, collaborate and leave the political disputes in order to save the Egyptian economy, which is on a danger state.

For his part, head of Egypt’s Ghad Al-Thawra Party, Ayman Nour said that burning the party's headquarters yesterday evening is a clear message that there are people who do not want such a conference to be held, because it discusses the challenges and prospects for the future of the Egyptian economy.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - head of Egypt’s Ghad Al-Thawra Party, Ayman Nour:
“We have to think in the interests of Egypt away from all political disputes. We have to think in how to save Egypt and its revolution which some people believe that it is the reason behind their deteriorating state. Egypt still has wise and honorable people who are able to direct their efforts to save the Egyptian economy.”

Earlier on Friday, headquarters of Ghad Al-Thawra Party was torched by masked men, shortly after party founder Ayman Nour had said he wouldn't mind taking up a leadership position if invited by Egypt President Mohamed Morsi.

Egypt’s former PM Dr. Ali Lutfi, stressed the importance of solidarity among all people and government to save the Egyptian economy, proposing a voluntary initiative that rich people and businessmen in Egypt to donate 1600 LE, through a fund called "Recovery of support" to be established by the Ministry of Finance.
The conference was held at Ain Shames University in Cairo with the participation of at least 15 political parties.

End VCS item

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Egypt’s Economy grew only 2.2% in 2nd...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
22 Feb 2013

Story: Egypt’s Economy grew only 2.2% in 2nd quarter of 2012/13

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: February 21, 2013
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: February 21, 2013
Length: 0:02:03
Video Size: 101 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various shots of attendees during the press conference of Egypt’s Planning Minister and International Cooperation held at the headquarters of the ministry
2- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Egypt’s Planning and International Cooperation Minister Ashraf al-Araby:
“We are targeting at the end of the current fiscal year 2012/13 an economical growth of no less than 3 percent. We need to meet this target to achieve economic growth rate that exceeds 3 percent in the second half of the year.” 3- Various shots of attendees during the conference
4- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Egypt’s Planning and International Cooperation Minister Ashraf al-Araby:
“Actually, the current economic situation is much more difficult even than it was after the revolution hence, we need to put all our political disputes aside. We need to reach a political consensus to overcome this difficult phase that the Egyptian economy is facing and to move forward.” 5- Various shots of the press conference
6- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) - Egypt’s Planning and International Cooperation Minister Ashraf al-Araby:
“God willing, we expect to invite the IMF technical delegation within days and we will show you in details of the axes which the national program include that we will present to the IMF.” 7- Various shots of the press conference

STORYLINE:

Egypt’s Planning and International Cooperation Minister Ashraf al-Araby said on Thursday, February 21, in a press conference that the Egyptian economy grew only 2.2 percent in 2nd quarter of 2012/13, representing a 15.3 percent decrease on the previous quarter.

Al-Araby said that the first half of fiscal year 2012/13 (July-December) saw economic growth of 2.4 percent, which had been 0.1 percent lower than expected.

He said that the government is targeting economic growth of no less than 3 percent in the current fiscal year.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Egypt’s Planning and International Cooperation Minister Ashraf al-Araby:
“We are targeting at the end of the current fiscal year 2012/13 an economical growth of no less than 3 percent. We need to meet this target to achieve economic growth rate that exceeds 3 percent in the second half of the year.”

He said that foreign investment in Egypt was almost non-existent in the six months to the end of December, illustrating the depth of the economic crisis that Egypt is facing.

He added that the country needed strong investment to reach the 7 percent annual economic growth rate commonly cited by economists as the level needed to lower unemployment and soak up new entrants to the labour market.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) - Egypt’s Planning and International Cooperation Minister Ashraf al-Araby:
“Actually, the current economic situation is much more difficult even than it was after the revolution hence, we need to put all our political disputes aside. We need to reach a political consensus to overcome this difficult phase that the Egyptian economy is facing and to move forward.”

The Egyptian government plans within one week to invite an International Monetary Fund mission for talks, al-Araby said on Thursday.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) - Egypt’s Planning and International Cooperation Minister Ashraf al-Araby:
“God willing, we expect to invite the IMF technical delegation within days and we will show you in details of the axes which the national program include that we will present to the IMF.”

Egypt reached an initial agreement with the IMF on the loan agreement in November but postponed final ratification in December because of political unrest at the time.

End VCS item

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Homeless persons in Athens (1 of 14)
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
27 Jan 2013

A homeless man with a handamde sign that reads "Please help me I have been homeless for many months"

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Crisis forces many shops in Greece to...
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
17 Dec 2012

A window of a long closed shop with some of its merchandise still remaining.

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Crisis forces many shops in Greece to...
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
12 Dec 2012

Seen here in an entrance of a shop is a sign that reads "For rent" in Greek.

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Students commemorate the 1973 uprisin...
Athens, Greece
By Nikolas Georgiou
17 Nov 2012

A massive demonstration takes place in memory of the Athens Polytechnic Students uprising against the junta, in 1973. Youth unemployment is over 55% and drives more and more Greeks to seek work in other European countries.

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Demonstration in Athens
Athens, Greece
By Nikolas Georgiou
11 Nov 2012

Thousands gather in front of the Greek Parliament responding to a call by left wing parties and workers' unions to protest over the 2013 budget which would bring more cuts in wages and social wellfare.

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Anarchist Labor Unions Call Strike (1...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
31 Oct 2012

Vandalism in the Zara store in Barcelona.
October 31, 2012, Barcelona, Spain. The CGT and CNT anarchist labor unions called a 24 hour strike. The day of action is in defense of public services and a protest against social cuts and unemployment. They also complain that salaries in Spain are the lowest in Europe while the unemployment rate is the highest: it is over the 25% of the population and in the case of young people under the age of 25 the rate goes up to 52%. Considering this economic context they also criticize the rising taxes such as the VAT.

The protests started at noon in Plaza de Catalunya. From there people went to places like the AppStore in Plaza de Catalunya and the FNAC. After, they went into a Zara store. There was a tense moment as one of the approximately 300 protesters had taken a mannequin and had thrown items on the floor of the store. The people that caused the accident were a group of fifty hooded individuals; CGT claims not to be involved.

Actos vandálicos en la tienda Zara de Barcelona.
31 de Octubre 2012, Barcelona, Spain. Los sindicatos Anarquistas CGT y CNT convocaron una huelga de 24 horas. La jornada de lucha se hace en protesta contra los recortes sociales, el paro y en defensa de los servicios públicos. Además, denuncian que los sueldos son los más bajos de Europa y el índice de paro, el más alto, ya que supera el 25% de la población y en el caso de los jóvenes menores de 25 años es del 52%. Con todo este contexto económico, critican la subida de impuestos como el IVA.
Las protestas de esta jornada han comenzado a mediodía en la plaza de Catalunya. Desde allí se dirigieron a establecimientos como la AppStore de la plaza de Cataluña y también la FNAC. Después han ido a una tienda de Zara, donde se han vivido algunos momentos de tensión cuando algunos de los cerca de 300 manifestantes han tomado un maniquí y han lanzado por tierra algunas prendas del establecimiento. Los autores del incidente han sido un grupo de una cincuentena de personas encapuchadas de las cuales la CGT se ha desmarcado totalmente.