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Street Clashes in Taiz, Yemen
Taiz
By Dhaifallah Homran
26 Apr 2015

Taiz, Yemen
April 26, 2015

Video shows clashes on the streets of Taiz, about 300 km south of the Yemeni capital Sanaa. Houthi fighters, backed by Yemeni army units, used rifles and armored personnel carriers to confront militiamen loyal to President Abed Rabbu Mansour Hadi.

SHOTLIST

Wide of fighter loyal to President Hadi firing sniper rifle
Wide of fighter loyal to President Hadi taking cover
Wide of armored personnel carrier and Houti fighters
Moving shot of Houthi fighters and pro-Houthi Yemeni soldiers on the street
Wide Houthi fighters manoeuvring pickup truck
Wide of armored personnel carrier firing heavy machine gun

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Tribal Forces in Hadramawt Defy Houthis
Thamoud
By Amged Sabeeh
10 Apr 2015

April 10, 2014
Hadramawt, Yemen

Dozens of armed men from the Awamer clans paraded against the Houthis in Hawarem, a desert area in the southern Yemeni province of Hadramawt near the border with Saudi Arabia.
This video shows the tribesmen driving a convoy of pickup trucks and SUVs that carry the Awamer tribal flag in a desert area while brandishing rifles, machineguns and rocket-propelled grenade launchers. The men are then seen forming a circle and chanting, as well as shooting their weapons in the air.
The footage also includes an interview with Saleh al-Ameri, a leader of the Awamer clans, in which he declares his tribe’s solidarity with Gulf countries “against any aggression.”

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Saleh al-Ameri, A leader of the Awamer clans
07:48 – 08:47

“The Awamer tribes have gathered today. We met here in Hawarem in order to discuss what is going on in the country in general. We have expressed our willingness to adopt the position of the area’s tribes – the tribes in Hadramawt province – in order to defend the country against any aggression. In fact, the security of our country is related to the security of entire Yemen as well as neighboring countries. We, the people of Gulf countries, are prepared to fulfil our duty in defending our homeland. You have doubtless seen these gatherings that have come from everywhere to declare that they are united against any aggression or sabotage that could target our country. We are prepared to defend our homeland. Peace be upon you.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Tribal Fighter
08:47 – 08:57

The Awamer tribes have convened in the desert. God willing, we shall safeguard the security of the desert against any aggression. We shall push any aggression back, God willing.”

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Peshmerga Check Refugees Returning to...
Kirkuk
By mushtaq mohammed
24 Mar 2015

March 23, 2015
Kirkuk, Iraq

Iraqis who are finally returning to their villages in Kirkuk are searched intensively by Peshmerga fighters who liberated the area from ISIS control. The residents of the villages of Daquq, al-Said, al-Wahda are asked to provide proof of identity and made to sign agreements that they will not allow anyone from outside of the village to enter or stay there.

:عقيد عبدالله ضابط في اللواء الثالث في البيشمركة‎

هذه القرى هي الآن تحت سلطة اقليم كردستان العراق وبمساعدة من العشائر تمكنا من طرد داعش، والآن بعد تحرير مناطقهم تم تبليغ العوائل للعودة اليها."

نحن الآن نفتش وندقق مواكب الناس الذين قرروا العودة الى بيوتهم ونتأكد من عدم وجود مندس او مخرب بين صفوفهم عن طريق مختار المنطقة وضباط الامن والمخابرات وقد تم توقيع العوائل على تعهد بعدم ايواء الغرباء في بيوتهم "وكذلك التبليغ عن الغرباء ان وجدوا.

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Texan Explains Motives for Joining Ku...
Tal Tamer
By TTM Contributor 33
09 Mar 2015

Tal Tamer, Syria
March 7, 2015

George, who declined to give his last name but prefers to go by Fat Jack, sold his possessions in San Antonio, Texas and bought a plane ticket to join Kurdish forces battling ISIS in the Hasaka province of Syria, a strategic village near the Iraqi-Syrian border whose Christian, Kurdish, Assyrian and Arab inhabitants had mostly fled. Perturbed that "no one was doing nothing" to stop the spread of the militant group and curious to know "how a normal person would come to fight evil", he joined the YPG.

Though Fat Jack admits there are sizable military and cultural differences between Americans and Kurds, and that the language barrier has been substantial, he also says that he decided to join the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) because they were "good" people whom "he could trust."

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide of town and YPG flag
Various of female and male Kurdish fighters near Humvee
Traveling of YPG vehicle passing a checkpoint
Wide of female and male Kurdish fighters
Wide of town and fields. NAT Sound: Gunshots
Wide of ‘Fat Jack’
Various of town and fields
Wide, R-L pan of ‘Fat Jack’ driving off in a pickup truck with YPG flag
Wide of fighter going into armored personnel carrier with YPG flag
Wide of tank with YPG flag
Wide of ‘Fat Jack’ getting into a pickup truck with YPG flag
Wide of fighters near YPG vehicles
Wide of ‘Fat Jack’ parking pickup truck
Wide of tank with YPG flag. NAT Sound: Gunshots
Wide of ‘Fat Jack’ stepping out of a pickup truck with YPG flag, talking to Kurdish fighter

SOUNDBITE (English, Man) ‘Fat Jack’ American volunteer with the YPG
03:42 - 07:41

  • Your name and where you are from.

  • I go by Fat Jack, my American nickname. I’m from San Antonio, Texas.

  • Why did you decide to come here?

  • The only way I know how to fight Daesh [ISIS] with people I could trust.

  • How did you see the situation here in Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan] during the clashes?

  • Originally since I’ve been here? I heard about Daesh in the media for a long time. Nobody was doing nothing. On the internet, I found out about the YPG. I started doing my homework. That’s how I got... I sold my stuff, bought a plane ticket and came on.

  • Can you talk about the situation more? About Rojava, the people here? The clashes?

  • Well there’s the culture difference that’s kind of a… wow! But the people are good people. The language barrier has been a bit of a problem. The people here, you know, they’re nice people. That’s the reason I came with the YPG. I trust them; they’re Kurdish, their reputation… so that’s how I came here just to… simply to fight Daesh.

  • And how did you decide to participate [with] the YPG against Daesh?

  • I guess I’ve seen a story of an American that came over. That night I was like… wow! You’ve got lunatics from all over the world that come to join Daesh, and you always wonder how these lunatics from all over the world come together. Much less find one more, but how do you find thousands? And then I was wondering how would a normal person come to fight evil? About three days later, that’s when I found the story about an American that came over. That’s how I ended up here.

  • Your last message to the world – if you want to send a message to the world or say anything.

  • Daesh has to be stopped. I mean, no matter where you are; what country or religion; your politics, murder and rape is evil. I mean in Daesh they murder… they rape and murder… they murder children and they would be speaking God’s name in their mouth while they murder. And just…

  • Can you please describe the clashes now in Tal Tamer?

  • From my point of view, it’s different. Our militaries are different. It’s just different. I don't know how to....”

Various of Kurdish fighters and military vehicles

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Young Houthi Boys in Yemen Trained as...
Amran,Yemen
By Dhaifallah Homran
01 Mar 2015

March 1, 2015
Amran, Yemen

Houthi children are being trained as fighters in a former Yemeni Army base.
Boys aged from 12 and up to teenagers are being taught by Houthi fighters how to handle and shoot rifles and fighting tactics.

Video shot at the former base of Yemeni Army, Mechanized Unit 310, in the Houth region in Amran province, in north east Yemen.

The base was captured by the Houthis in the summer of 2014, and during the battle the Yemeni Army commander of the base, general Hamid al-Qosheibi, was killed.

After their training the child soldiers are being assigned to man checkpoints and provide security at demonstrations.

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ISIS Show Off in Derna
Derna
By MENA Desk
28 Feb 2015

February 2015
Derna, Libya

Video shot by an eyewitness at the end of February 2015 showing ISIS militants parading through the streets of the northeastern Libyan city of Derna.

The fighters drive in convoys sounding their horns and showing off their guns and flags on a public highway in central Derna as they pass by civilian cars.

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"