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ISIS Operate Islamic Courts and Water...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

ISIS functionaries claim to have introduced both Islamic courts and a functioning department of water management in Raqqa. In this video, several people can be seen at an ISIS-run Islamic sharia court. Interviewed plaintiffs say they are pleased with legal services provided under ISIS - which they consider fair and considerably better than what they experienced under the Syrian regime.

Footage also includes an interview with a functionary at the local department of water management. The official claims that his staff are purifying water and conducting studies to develop better provision of water.

TRANSCRIPT AND SHOTLIST

Wide of al-Dillah roundabout
Wide of propaganda billboards “God’s sharia should be the arbiter.” “The crusader against Islam.”
Wide of Al-Fawwaz Mosque
Wide of shops
Wide of children and man washing before prayer
Various of street food stands
Wide of two men eating
Wide of school girls walking
Wide of women and children in al-Rashid Park
Various of shops
Wide of military equipment store
Wide of fighter looking at fabrics
Wide of propaganda billboard “The traitors of Islam”
Wide of propaganda billboards that read: “Arab tyrants, your hands are tarnished with Muslims’ blood.” “The crusade against Islam.”
Wide of ISIS flag in the street
Various of preaching stand broadcasting Quranic recitation
Various of ISIS traffic police

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, Water department official and ISIS member

01:53 – 02:37

"In the name of God and prayers be upon Prophet Mohammad. We, at the water department in Wilayat Raqqa [Raqqa Province], the Islamic State, are providing water for the common people. We are conducting repairs and mechanical works in all projects in Wilayat Raqqa. Water is being purified using chlorine and liquid hypochlorite then pumped in the grid. The water department follows up on complaints and technical failures, as well as applies necessary repairs in various workshops in Wilayat Raqqa. Finally, the Studies Department performs studies necessary for new projects to cover people’s current and future needs for water. Thanks be to God almighty. Peace be upon you.”

Wide of men’s entrance to Islamic court

Wide of women’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of men’s entrance to Islamic court

Various of people walking into court

Various of people sitting inside the court
Various of ISIS legal workers receiving files from plaintiffs
Various of court waiting room
Wide of ISIS legal worker handling files
Various of court waiting room
Various/ close-ups of legal documents

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Humam al-Ansari, legal worker at Islamic court run by ISIS
03:38 – 04:12
“In the name of God the Merciful the Compassionate, and God’s prayers be upon Prophet Mohamad and his family and companions. Thanks be to Good who enabled us to conquer these lands. Thanks be to God who enable us to establish these courts of law in Wilyat al-Raqqa [Name ISIS uses for Raqqa province].
Thanks be to God, we are fulfilling our work to grant all people their rights and correct any injustice that has befallen our Muslim brothers. Today, judges and everyone else are fulfilling their work to apply God’s sharia law. We treat people as our brethren.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad al-Rashed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:12 – 04:38

“Peace be upon you. We are before the Islamic court in the city of Raqqa. Thanks be to God, the treatment is very good. Under the regime, if someone wanted to come to the court he would have had to pay bribes. People with legitimate rights suffered injustice. This was always the case. Thanks be to God, at the present time, treatment cannot be any better. One’s rights have been reinstated, God willing. Your right will not be lost, even if you were entitled to something as small as a particle.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Munir Ahmed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:39 – 05:20
“Thanks be to God almighty, I presented a case at the Islamic court in Wilyat Raqqa. Thanks be to God, there is cooperation on behalf of the judges and the other brothers. They understand people’s needs. Thanks be to God. I have a lawsuit that involves myself and another person. We resorted to God’s sharia law and the verdict has not been issued yet. Thanks be to God for everything.
Thanks be to God that we got rid of that infidel and debauched regime. Previously, if you were entitled to a right, you would be treated as a wrongdoer. One had to bribe judges and officials."

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ISIS Issues Resident ID Cards in Raqqa
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of these videos on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

Video shows the civil status office in Raqqa, ISIS' biggest stronghold in Syria. Syrian citizens can be seen handing over their IDs issued by the Syrian government and receiving ones given to them by ISIS authorities. Ibrahim is applying for a birth certificate for his 1-year old son Sufian who, according to his father, was born when the Free Syrian Army was still in control of the city. At the time, government offices were closed and he was not able to obtain the proper documentation. Today he says that he is grateful that the “Islamic State” is reactivating government services.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of ISIS traffic police
Various of ISIS police (al-Hisba) vehicles broadcasting calls for prayer
Various of vehicle broadcasting ISIS anthem
Vaious of street food stands
Various of fighter carrying a rifle and a baby at the market
Various of people in park
Wide of ISIS’ Personal Status Office (PSO)
Various of people entering PSO to apply for IDs
Various of people applying for IDs
Close-ups of retrieved IDs issued by the Syrian government
Various of preparing new IDs
Close-up of personal status data displayed on computer
Various of entering data related to new IDs using computers
Various of people being given their new IDs
Various of Raqqa resident Khaled and his baby Sufian inside taxi on their way to PSO
Various of Khaled and his baby Sufian entering PSO
Various of ISIS employee filling in information for birth certificate
Various of man applying for birth certificate
Various of witness singing application
Various of witnesses signing application
Various of application process

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ibrahim, the father of baby Sufian whose birth certificate is being issued
04:16 – 04:52

“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate. I had a newborn about a year ago. You can see him. He is about one year old. At that time, the Free Syrian Army was present and there were no government offices.
Thanks be to God, now that the Islamic State is present, government offices are being gradually activated. One of these departments is the Personal Status Office, where they [ISIS members] are registering newly born babies.”

Various of Khaled receiving birth certificate and leaving building
Various of street food stands
Wide of perfume shop
Various of shops
Various of al-Dalla Roundabout
Wide of men praying in the street
Wide of billboard calling people to pay Zaqat (Islamic alms)
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “Now… now… the fighting has come.”
Wide of street
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his messenger.”

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ISIS-Run Government Institutions in R...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in any way constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

At the personal status office in Raqqa, ISIS' biggest stronghold in Syria, Syrian citizens can be seen handing over their IDs issued by the Syrian government and receiving ones given to them by ISIS authorities. Ibrahim is applying for a birth certificate for his one-year-old son Sufian who, according to his father, was born when the Free Syrian Army was still in control of the city. At the time, government offices were closed and he was not able to obtain the proper documentation. Today he says that he is grateful that the “Islamic State” is reactivating government services.
ISIS functionaries claim to have introduced both Islamic courts and a functioning department of water management in Raqqa. In this video, several people can be seen at an ISIS-run Islamic sharia court. Interviewed plaintiffs say they are pleased with legal services provided under ISIS - which they consider fair and considerably better than what they experienced under the Syrian regime.
Footage also includes an interview with a functionary at the local department of water management. The official claims that his staff are purifying water and conducting studies to develop better provision of water.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of streets
Various of fighter carrying a rifle and a baby at the market
Wide of mosque
Various of children, women and men in park
Wide of market
Various of street food stands
Wide of perfume shop
Wide of two men eating
Wide of schoolgirls walking
Wide of women and children in al-Rashid Park
Wide of vegetable shop
Wide of street food cart
Wide of military equipment store
Wide of jewelry store
Wide of fighter looking at fabrics
Wide of women in front shops
Wide of children and man washing before prayer
Various of women buying candy for children in park
Wide of armed man with children in park
Various of al-Dillah roundabout (coffee pot fountain)
Wide of men praying in the street
Wide of men’s entrance to Islamic court
Wide of women’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of men’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of people walking into court
Various of people sitting inside the court
Various of ISIS legal workers receiving files from plaintiffs
Various of court waiting room
Various of ISIS legal worker handling files
Various of court waiting room
Various/ close-ups of legal documents

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Humam al-Ansari, legal worker at Islamic court run by ISIS

03:29 – 04:02

“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate, and God’s prayers be upon Prophet Mohamad and his family and companions. Thanks be to Good who enabled us to conquer these lands. Thanks be to God who enable us to establish these courts of law in Wilayat al-Raqqa [Name ISIS uses for Raqqa province]. Thanks be to God, we are fulfilling our work to grant all people their rights and correct any injustice that has befallen our Muslim brothers. Today, judges and everyone else are fulfilling their work to apply God’s sharia law. We treat people as our brethren.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad al-Rashed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS
04:03 – 04:30
“Peace be upon you. We are before the Islamic court in the city of Raqqa. Thanks be to God, the treatment is very good. Under the regime, if someone wanted to come to the court he would have had to pay bribes. People with legitimate rights suffered injustice. This was always the case. Thanks be to God, at the present time, treatment cannot be any better. One’s rights have been reinstated, God willing. Your right will not be lost, even if you were entitled to something as small as a particle.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Munir Ahmed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:31 – 05:11

“Thanks be to God almighty, I presented a case at the Islamic court in Wilayat Raqqa. Thanks be to God, there is cooperation on behalf of the judges and the other brothers. They understand people’s needs. Thanks be to God. I have a lawsuit that involves myself and another person. We resorted to God’s sharia law and the verdict has not been issued yet. Thanks be to God for everything. Thanks be to God that we got rid of that infidel and debauched regime. Previously, if you were entitled to a right, you would be treated as a wrongdoer. One had to bribe judges and officials."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, Water department official and ISIS member

05:12 – 05:55

"In the name of God and prayers be upon Prophet Mohammad. We, at the water department in Wilayat Raqqa [Raqqa Province], the Islamic State, are providing water for the common people. We are conducting repairs and mechanical works in all projects in Wilayat Raqqa. Water is being purified using chlorine gas and liquid hypochlorite then pumped in the grid. The water department follows up on complaints and technical failures, as well as applies necessary repairs in various workshops in Wilayat Raqqa. Finally, the Studies Department performs studies necessary for new projects to cover people’s current and future needs for water. Thanks be to God almighty. Peace be upon you.”

Wide of Clock Tower square
Wide of Raqqa and large ISIS flag
Wide of propaganda billboards that read: “Arab tyrants, your hands are tarnished with Muslims’ blood.” “The crusade against Islam.”
Wide of roundabout and ISIS flags
Wide of billboard calling people to pay Zakat (Islamic alms)
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “Now… now… the fighting has come.”
Wide of street
Various of loudspeaker in ISIS preaching office broadcasting Quran
Wide of propaganda billboard “The traitors of Islam”
Wide of roundabout
Wide of propaganda billboards “God’s sharia should be the arbiter.” “The crusader against Islam.”
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his messenger.”
Various of ISIS police (al-Hisba) vehicles broadcasting calls for prayer
Various of vehicle broadcasting ISIS anthem
Various of ISIS traffic police
Wide of ISIS-run Personal Status Office (PSO)
Various of people entering PSO to apply for IDs
Various of people applying for IDs
Various of ISIS employees entering data related to new IDs using computers
Close-ups of IDs issued by the Syrian government
Various of ISIS employees preparing new IDs
Close-up of personal status data displayed on computer
Various of people being given their new IDs
Various of Raqqa resident Ibrahim and his baby Sufian inside taxi on their way to PSO
Various of Ibrahim and his baby Sufian entering PSO
Various of ISIS employee filling in information for birth certificate
Various of Ibrahim applying for birth certificate
Various of witness singing application
Wide of baby Sufian
Wide of Ibrahim signing application

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ibrahim, the father of baby Sufian whose birth certificate is being issued

10:32 – 11:08
“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate. I had a newborn about a year ago. You can see him. He is about one year old. At that time, the Free Syrian Army was present and there were no government offices. Thanks be to God, now that the Islamic State is present, government offices are being gradually activated. One of these departments is the Personal Status Office, where they [ISIS members] are registering newly born babies.”

Various of Khaled receiving birth certificate and leaving building
Various of street food stands

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FSA Fights to Protect Civil Status Re...
Damascus
By Mohamad al-jazaare
09 Nov 2014

Eastern Ghouta, Syria
November 2014

A Free Syrian Army (FSA) group took over the civil status registry near Damascus. The official building contains documents such as birth certificates, identity card application forms and marriage contracts.

FSA fighters claim that they moved the documents through tunnels to a safe location after discovering that part of them has been damaged by the fighting.

This footage shows the battle to take over the civil status office near Damascus and the official building from the inside. A large amount of personal status documents can be seen, some of them torn.

Fighters can be seen in the video carrying large bags of documents through tunnels.

Shot List

1 Wide of fighter shooting through hole.
2 Wide of fighters running to re-position.
3 Wide of fighters taking cover.
4 Medium of fighter shooting through hole.
5 Wide of fighters taking cover.
6 Wide of shooting machine gun mounted on vehicle.
7 Wide of smoke.
8 Wide of destroyed buildings.
9 Various of fighters running/ walking amid rubble

10 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) FSA commander Abu al-Jud

"We took over the civil registry office and the mosque. We advanced from the right side and took over Lamees area, and we also took over the Mazda company building. We are now very close to the municipality."

11 Close up of sign “Store” 12 Close up sign “Documents Certification”
13 Close up of writing on wall.
14 Close up of computers.
15 Close up of writing on wall.
16 Close up of ID cards.
17 Wide of inside building.
18 Various ID application forms for ID.
19 Close of birth certificate.
20 Various of torn documents.
21 Close up of broken ID, spent bullets on the floor.
22 Close up of IDs on the floor.
23 SOUNDBITE (Arabic. Man) FSA commander Mufid Abdel Hadi

"After liberating the civil registry office, we realized the importance of the documents that the regime tried to burn. We informed special committees about the documents and they confirmed that we need to recover them. We dug underground tunnels with the help of fighters and we took the documents to a safe place."

24 Medium of men taking documents out of bags
25 Close up of fighter taking documents out of bag.

26 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) FSA commander Abu al-Jud

“Some of these documents are burnt.”

27 Wide of registry books.
28 Various of torn documents.
29 Wide of fighters carrying bags through tunnel.
30 Various of documents.
31 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Uabada, Member of pro-opposition Legal Office

"We are now in the civil registry office for Damascus and its rural areas. We are at the front line of Erbeen, since it has been liberated by the fighters. The office is always a target for shelling and bombing by the regime. We found many important documents such as birth and death certificates, marriage licenses, and civil documents for people from Damascus and its rural areas. Not only for inhabitants of Erbeen, but also those from Kalamoon, Haramoon, and al-Yarmouk camp."

32 Various of fighters walking through tunnel.

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The Jewish Community in Livorno Article
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
16 Apr 2013

Livorno is considered the most modern of all the towns of the Tuscany region. It has the biggest port of the region and it is the most populated coastal town. The emblem of the town is the monument of the four “mori” - pirates - a famous sculpture that represents dark-skinned pirates constricted by chains at
the feet of the Grand Duke Ferdinando I. The artwork has been realized during the time in which the town was enhanced itself as cosmopolitan town, through establishment of rules that allows the town to welcome with open arms Jewish people banished from Spain and Portugal. The story of Jewish people living in Livorno starts since that moment. Historical tradition of Livorno and Jewish culture are merged permanently until nowadays and Livorno is defined as the town of Judaism. It was held by Jew family the memorable bookshop and the publishing house named Belforte. Typical dishes the “roschette”,
caucciucco(fish stew) and the Livorno-style mullet are of the Sephardic tradition.

Like the typical words as “sciagattato” – ruined, and “gadollo” - fat or “gavinoso” – funny, which are picked up from the Bagitto and Hebrew dialect and still in use today . Jew was the Mayor of the prefascist town of Livorno, the Socialist Umberto Mondolfi. The list is including religious citizens like Rabbis Elia Benamozegh – was the Rabbi of Livorno for 50 years, Rabbi Sabato Morais and Alfredo Toaff, famous people like the philanthropist Moses Montefiore, sages and intellectuals like Attias, D'Ancona and Enriques, famous painters like Tivoli, Corcos and of course Amedeo Modigliani. These are only few
famous names of the entire Jewish community of Livorno. Livorno is housing of an old Sephardic Synagogue, considered one of the biggest and beautiful Synagogue around the world, it was built in 1591 but seriously damaged by the American bombing in 1945, then it became the goal of several raids during
the last time of second WW, and this led to a complete destruction of the Synagogue itself. The works for the new Synagogue committed to the architect Mr. Angelo di Castro started at the beginning of the sixties, a building of reinforced concrete inspired by the tabernacle (sanctuary tent) that accompanied the Jewish along the desert during the exodus- the new Synagogue has a modern style that it is not well accepted among the Jewish community of Livorno. Whatever, the young Rav Yair Didi religious leader of the community and well known and respected personality in the city is suggesting to not look the outside but the inside of the Synagogue. next to the synagogue is the center or the house of the Jewish community, there is the archive of the community,400 years of documents written in Portuguese, Italian or Hebrew. But the real oral memory is Gabriele Bedarida. He is keeping memories of what was the Jewish Livorno in the past. In the 1938, during the fascism period, before that the King enacted racial laws more than 1500 Jewish people lived in Livorno. More than 120 Jewish people of Livorno were wiped out in the Nazi concentration camps. Many of the people in the Jewish community of Livorno were rescued in the Nazi search, fleeing to the bush, hiding kids in convents, in religious colleges, or finding shelter by antiNazi friends. By the end of the WW II the Jewish community of Livorno had less than 1000 people.

Today there are around 600 Jewish people registered as Jewish community of Livorno, that leads, the community of Livorno to be considered one of the most important Jewish community in Italy after the one in Rome. But the Jewish community of Livorno is an old and aged community with no turnover. The last migration of Sephardic Jews in Livorno is dated to 1967 when due to the six days war many Jews abandoned Arab countries and part arrived in Livorno. Mainly people from the Bengasi community in Libya decided for moving to Livorno. Today the majority of the Jewish community of Livorno is made up by older people with only few young that rarely participate to the life of the community. There are around 70 Jewish people in Livorno that actively attend Jewish liturgies such as Shabbat and even more than 400 persons during Pesach or Yom Kippur. In the last three years 6 young Jews decided to leave Italy to
flee to Israel for aliyah. In the city center and in the market many shops are still run by Jew families: like the Disegni, Zarrugh, Doha, Modigliani, Bueno and Lombardo are some of the common names. On the other hand the Jewish school closed during the fascism has never been reopened and the same destiny
has occurred to the Jewish hospital and after a while to the old cemetery. There is no any Israeli restaurant in Livorno , the last running was closed four years ago. There is a bakery that works under Jewish rules producing bread without milk or animal fat/lard. There is also a kosher batcher that supplies
kosher meet to members of the Jewish community of Livorno. There is a Jewish museum, located in Villa Marini belonged to Marini family until 1867,was used as a synagogue until the new synagogue was open and on 1992 opened as a museum. the small collection is including a Hechal(temple) of the XVI
century,shofar,tallit on the wall are old marriage agreements.

There is an old cemetery closed and in a state of completely decay. The new cemetery is in use and located in the north of the city and it is near the general cemetery. In the new cemetery are the grave of Modeliani family and two memory boards one perpetuates the Jewish people that died during First World War and the other perpetuates the victims of the holocaust.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (13 o...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
15 Apr 2013

Gabriele Bedarida searches for Hebrew written documents in the archive of the Jewish community located in Livorno, Italy.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (12 o...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
15 Apr 2013

Rabbi Yair Didi of Livorno, Italy (on left) and
Gabriele Bedarida searching for Hebrew written documents in the Jewish community archive located in
Livorno, Italy.

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The Jewish community in Livorno (11 o...
Livorno, Italy
By Nili Bassan
15 Apr 2013

In the Jewish community of Livorno,
Gabriele Bedarida holds a book containing documents, in Hebrew, related to the history of the Jewish community of Livorno, Italy.

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Election clerk hands out ballots at t...
Nairobi, Kenya
By tipilakota
04 Mar 2013

Election clerk hands out ballots at the Westlands Primary polling station as Kenyans turn out to elect the country's fourth president

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (4 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

After Somalia's independence in 1960, many young Somali students were offered scholarships from European universities. One such student, Abdi Egal Hassan (left), just 19 at the time, earned a scholarship to studying printing in Germany in 1961. He graduated in 1963, and returned to Somalia to start Daha Printing Press, named after his first daughter.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (13 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Dozens of boxes of hard metal typfaces fill a wooden shelf near the printer. Each box has the typeface name, and font sizes, from 8 through 48.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (14 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Kasim moves swiftly around the machine. Like a dancer, he has style, a unique way of pushing, filling, cutting, pushing, rotating, and moving. He doesnt speak any English, but acts in effective gestures, like sign language. I check his handsnot one cut, missing finger, or bruise.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (15 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Liban, who inherited Daha after his father died, leafs through a collection of old receipts. As a teenager, Liban worked in the shop with his father after school, and briefly ran it in the 80s before moving to the US. When Liban visited in 1997, he found over $1 million in outstanding loans from the government, which had taken prints on loan but never paid. He quickly turned the shop around stating No credit for anyone!

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (16 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

UNDP's Somalia Annual Development Report from 1985. One notable excerpt: Currently, the government is not placing a high priority on the development of tourism. There nevertheless exists a considerable potential to exploit the attractions of the extensive and wholly unspoilt coast.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (17 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Receipts from the 1980s, before the Somali civil war. Some are written in Somali, others in Italian. The price, 6,650 Somali Shillings, is worth less than 25 cents today

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THE LETTERPRESS OF MOGADISHU
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Mais Istanbuli
01 Oct 2012

A print shop in the Somali capital tells the story of the country's two decades of turmoil -- and rebirth.
In a tiny, damp, oil-soaked cellar tucked behind one of Mogadishu's bullet-pocked central streets, fragile remnants of a city's survival clutter the rickety shelves. Their location, hidden just beneath Mogadishu's shelled façade, is perhaps their only reason for survival.

For 45 years, Daha Printing Press has accumulated an inked archive of Mogadishu's intricate, vibrant and violent political and social history. As governments, dictators, warlords, and militias battled for control of the streets above, Daha operated like a well-oiled machine, printing for all who walked in their door. Everybody, it seems, has something to print.

"Even warlords needed to collect taxes," Liban Egal, the son of Daha's original owner, asserts.

Customs declaration forms for Mogadishu's bustling port, still written in Italian from early post-colonial days, sit freshly pressed on the table; they are being repurposed for Somalia's new government. Tax collection slips and Central Bank account ledgers from the military rule of Mohamed Siad Barre -- whose ousting in 1991 launched two decades of civil war -- litter the stock room. Business cards, like that of notorious warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid, who was the target of a failed American assassination attempt (which in turn resulted the infamous 'Black Hawk Down' incident), fill old wooden drawers. Even United Nations Development Program reports from the 1980's hide under crumbling shelves.

Originally opened in central Mogadishu in 1967, Daha Printing Press was founded by 25 year-old Abdi Egal Hassan. Hassan took skills he mastered studying printmaking in Germany through a scholarship, and built a thriving enterprise.

By 1969, General Mohamed Siad Barre staged a successful military coup and took control of Somalia. He experimented with Chinese-influenced 'scientific socialism,' and in 1971 all private sector workers became government employees. All large businesses became government businesses. Daha was shut down.

Barre eventually switched sides during the Cold War, aligning with the US. In 1983 Abdi was able to reopen Daha Printing Press. The small letterpress shop has remained unchanged in location, machinery and employees, ever since.

Liban Egal, Abdi Egal Hassan's son, currently owns Daha. Liban, who grew up working the printing press after school, has recently returned to Mogadishu after spending more than twenty years abroad. In addition to resuming work at the press, he is founding the First Somali Bank -- Somalia's first since the collapse of the country's Central Bank in 1991 -- along with Somalia Wireless, a mobile internet company.

With Mogadishu quivering on the edge of sustained peace for the first time in two decades, Kasim Shiek Ahmed, whose family has labored behind the machines for 3 generations, and Liban are ready to welcome the arrival of Somalia's first real government in as many years. On August 20th, the Federal Parliament of Somalia was inaugurated, and the Federal Government of Somalia, the first permanent central government since 1991, replaced the Transitional Federal Government. On September 16th, Hassan Sheik Mohamud, a political activist and academic, was sworn in as Somalia's newest President.

"As soon as this new government begins, that's when we begin," exclaims Liban "Every Ministry will need some kind of paper."

The old Heidelberg printing press, its slickly oiled gears churning beneath the shell-shocked streets, will also press on. "We can't forget this machine," Kasim expresses with a wide grin. "It's like family