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TRAILER: Documentary on Tunisian Jiha...
Tunis
By darraji kerim
08 Jun 2015

This documentary film by International Pixel Productions tells the story of Tunisian jihadists who left to Syria to fight alongside ISIS.

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Troops Loyal to Libya Dawn Launch Off...
Sirte
By laura.lesevre
17 Mar 2015

March 17, 2015
Sirte, Libya

Islamist troops loyal to Libya Dawn, a self appointed government based in Tripoli, have been instructed to drive ISIS out of Sirte. The 166 Brigade and militias from Misrata began their offensive against ISIS in Sirte, a coastal city that used to be a stronghold of Muammar Gaddafi.

The allied Islamist fighters have not yet been able to enter the city despite launching an offensive on Saturday March 14, 2015. They claim that Gaddafi loyalists are in control of the city and are now fighting under the ISIS flag.

In this video Gian Micalessin, an Italian veteran war reporter with more than 30s years of experience in war journalism who has covered Libya since 2011 revolution, visits the front lines with the allied fighters.

A longer rough cut is available on request.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
20 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war. The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters. Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo. In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon. The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abbas al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander:

Abbas al-Asadi: “I will be heading to Samaraa, after this interview a car will come and pick us up and we will go there.

Interviewer: Did you just return from Samaraa for this interview?

Abbas: “No, I came to see my family but they [Army commanders] called me and told me to return. I am now in the army fighting ISIS but I need to return. They need me there. I took a few days off and went there, but now they need me, they called me and I have to return.”

Interviewer: Don't you think you are breaking the Norwegian law, or technically the law in all of Europe, by letting your children participate in war?

Abbas: “I will not break the Norwegian law or the Arabic law. My children came with me after the area was liberated, after the area became safe and the families returned to it. But my little child likes to wear my uniform and I taught him how to shoot just so he can have some experience. But he does not participate in war with me. I know he cannot participate in war, war is not for him.”

Interviewer: The last time we met with them, your children told us that they participated in war and in victories and in fighting ISIS. What is the reason for such statements?

Abbas: “He considers himself to be one with his father, and since his father participated and he entered Jurf al-Sakher after it was liberated, he considered himself as a participant. Of course he did not participate in the battles in Jurf al-Sakher, do you think I would want death for my son? It is impossible.”

Interviewer: When was the last time you went to Norway?

Abbas: “I was there last in 2008.”

Interviewer: Do you intend to return to Norway and if so, when?

Abbas: “Yes I intend to return to Norway, after the war with ISIS ends.”

Interviewer: How many are in your family?

Abbas: “Some of them are living in Oslo, and I have another son who is a doctor in America. According to our beliefs, a person who leaves jihad is an infidel. We ask God to help us and support us.”

Interviewer: Is your wife pleased with what you are doing?

Abbas: “Yes my wife is proud of me because I am fighting with the good people against the enemies.”
Interviewer: What do you want to tell the Norwegian government and the European Union who might think that you brought your son to participate in war?
Abbas: “I did not and will not involve my son in war, I repeat that, I did not and will not involve any of my youngest children in war. They go to school.. just like in anywhere else. When we liberated the area, many people and journalists came and my son was one of those people. He wanted to wear my uniform, and I allowed him to. It has nothing to do with war. We fought him the Arabic traditions, such as shooting, horseback riding, and other simple things. If a war happens in Norway, God forbid, I am willing to fight alongside them. If Norway or Europe needs me to fight, I will definitely help them. Norway is my country and Iraq is my country.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

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Charlie Hebdo Reactions in Lebanon's ...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Cherine Yazbeck
16 Jan 2015

Tripoli, Lebanon

January 16, 2015

Residents of the Muslim-majority city of Tripoli in north Lebanon denounced the caricature that portrays Prohpet Mohammad, published in the first issue of Charlie Hebdo after the attack that killed several of the weekly’s staff members.

This video shows interviews with Muslim men who participated in Friday prayer at Al-Tqwa Mosque in Tripoli, including Salafist Sheikh Salem Al Rifaei, member of the Association of Muslim Scholars in Lebanon.

Heavy presence of Lebanese Army and security forces was seen in the main streets of Tripoli during and after the Friday prayer.

Muslims around the world denounced the new Charlie Hebdo published after the deadly shooting. The shooting was carried out on January 7 at the newspaper's offices in Paris by two French Islamist militants and killed 12 persons, including caricaturists and a security officer. The latest issue of the newspaper was published on Wednesday January 14 and featured a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the front page.

Shot List

  1. Wide of Allah Square in Tripoli
  2. Wide of Lebanese Army vehicles in Allah Square
  3. Wide of police vehicles parked in main square
  4. Wide of shoe shiner polishing Lebanese soldier’s boots
  5. Wide of taxi driving of
  6. Wide of Taqwa mosque. NAT SOUND (Arabic): call to prayer
  7. Wide of Lebanese Army armored personnel carrier near Taqwa mosque
  8. Wide of screen featuring CCTV footage from inside mosque of cleric Sheikh Salem Rafei
  9. Wide of teenage boys praying outside mosque
  10. Wide of Sheikh Salem Rafei coming down the stairs

  11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mahmoud el-Rassif

1:07 We did not see them [the cartoons that portray Prophet Mohammad] we only had a glimpse. However, in general, this harms Muslims. Muslims feel this in their heart. This harms us. This is an insult to our prophet Mohammad, whose teachings and ethics guide us. For us, this is definitely unacceptable.
They should practice freedom of expression regarding their leaders; as our revered sheikh Salem said, they should do this with their kings, not prophets and God’s messengers. As I said, this harms us and Muslims. We do not accept this.
This is justice. They doomed themselves. We do not like aggression. No one should attack others’ religion.
Prophet Issa [Jesus] peace be upon Him whom Christians consider their prophet, or even their God – it is their own religion -- is also our prophet and a messenger of God whom we do wish to be harmed. We did not attack you, therefore do not attack us.

02:25 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Bahaa' Abass
Yes, I saw them [the cartoons]
Interviewer: What did you think of them?
This is blasphemy against Islam and Muslims. They are describing Prophet Mohammad in ways that God Almighty does approve. And Muslins also do not approve this. God’s enemies want to insult God’s religion. They are insulting our prophet. May God avenge whoever did this.
Those who insulted our Prophet deserve more than this. If they were still here… may God avenge them! God is greatest! May God avenge every person who described the Prophet in ways that do not befit him. This is the West! They claim to support democracy and freedom of media. God is greatest! May God avenge them.
Any Muslim needs to defend the Prophet peace be upon him.
They insulted the prophet peace be upon him. They are doing things that God almighty does not accept. They are doing this to say that Muslims have revolted and practiced terrorism. None of this is permissible. This is a conspiracy against Islam. This a conspiracy against Islam, Muslims and the Prophet peace be upon Him. This is a conspiracy! All of this is blasphemy.
Anyone who does not denounce what the newspaper has issued is considered a Muslim.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Men) Sheikh Salem el-Rafei, Imam of Takwa Mosque, member of Association of Muslim Scholars

04:41
Today, France in which the French Revolution took place and the scientific renaissance, and where a renaissance started which claims to defend the human rights to choose one’s religion, there is a newspaper that is insulting the Prophet of Islam, peace be upon Him. It would have been better for the French government and the Western governments to condemn this issue. They should not leave the condemnation to us; they should condemn it. This is an insult to all religions, an insult for one and a half billion Muslims around the world. They should have condemned this, but unfortunately, we see that the West is silent. They justified that by saying it is freedom of speech. Is it a freedom of expression in mocking Muslims and their religion?
We say that we feel sorry that the West reaches this level of intellect, at which it insults Muslim symbols, or the greatest symbol for Muslims and say it is freedom of expression.
We feel sorry that decadence in the West reaches this level. This is all staged. Germans doubted the images that they showed us and said that there were plans according to which the men who carried out the attacks were following. It was set up.
Germany believes that this has been set up by the French government and accused Muslim youth of doing it to justify it war on Libya. I think that first of all the French government should investigate this issue, before we say ‘terrorist attack’ or anything else. Investigate the issue. Maybe the men were killed without being interrogated. Without being given the chance to be detained and clear that [bad] image, which shows that Muslims are terrorists and extremists.
I wish that France conducts an investigation, and that media demands the French government to investigate what happened.
How could they jusyify this, it [French government] will say that terrorists came, therefore we can go into Libya and take oil. They do not care about principles or values. They drool when they see oil, the same way the US drooled over Iraqi oil. They said there were weapons of mass destruction but it was all a lie.
I say if France is Christian, it should emulate its pope. If France is Christian, then let it emulate the pope. If it is atheist and does not believe in any religion, then it should not insult any religion. The West cannot say “we are tolerant and accept the other” then insult the other’s religion and prophet. This is not fair and not an example of tolerance. This is intellectual terrorism. What can we call this? Intellectual terrorism. As they denounced [the killing] they should denounce [the cartoons]. This is more deserving of being denounced.
Interviewer: Are you preparing for any demonstrations in Tripoli?
Sheikh Rafei: We did not prepare anything, because everyone is conspiring against Muslims. If we demonstrate they will call us terrorists. What good will it do? If we go to the street, the [military] intelligence will

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Leaked Footage from ISIS Defector (Hi...
Deir-ez-Zur, Syria
By ttm contributor 31
06 Jan 2015

NOTE: The video clips in this collection were obtained by Transterra Media from a source who received it from a member of ISIS who defected from the group. According to the source the videos were recorded in the town of Zir and other locations in Syria between January and June, 2014.

Transterra Media cannot independently verify the accuracy of this content. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media (TTM) website does not in any way constitute endorsement by TTM of any claims or statements made in the video.

00:00
This video shows part of a meeting between a Saudi ISIS leader known as sheikh Abu Abdulla Daigham and tribal leaders and residents from the village of Zir, Deir al-Zor province.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sheikh Daigham, a Saudi ISIS leader
“You see, if every bandit was killed, by God, this will set an example for the people. ‘[In Raqqa] all punishments are applied, by God almighty’s grace.
“A drunken man would be flogged, as well as an adulterer... and the sorcerer would be killed. All punishments are applied. “Thanks be to God, we have two courts of law; one is dedicated to resolving issues among the people. It includes four judges and deals with issues of inheritance, divorce and similar issues, as well as land ownership – it deals with matters among the people. “We have another court that arbitrates between the people and the [Islamic] State. Whoever has a complaint against the State could present it before this court.”

00:37
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sheikh Daigham, a Saudi ISIS leader
“A civil state, in people from different affiliations could live together…. Christians, Jews, Druze… all people could coexist and be equal in the homeland. God forbid! This is the apogee of unbelief! This means that the entire country would be for everyone. No! The Prophet peace be upon said: He who changes his religion, kill him. “A Druze should say ‘I testify that there is no god but Allah and that Mohammad is the Allah’s messenger” and pray and fast, otherwise we kill him. “A Christian should either embrace Islam or pay the jizya [tax imposed on non-Muslims]. Otherwise, I would battle him.”

01:18
This is part of a video that features a group of ISIS fighters in an unnamed location believed to be on Euphrates river in Deir ez-Zur Province. The group is led by a young commander from the village of Zir in Deir ez-Zur province, known by the alias Abu Dujana.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Dujana, ISIS military commander
“God is greatest! The crocodiles are here.” Unseen fighter: “Come! Come! Abu Dujana!
“This is the crocodile group. They shall break the Alawites’ shield in Hawiqa [where regime-held air base is located], their last bastion. They have nothing left. They are under siege. Our brothers have laid siege on them. We will help our Muslim brothers. We all are all brothers. All believers are brothers! God is greatest!”

02:02
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Sheikh Daigham, ISIS official
“I have seen young men in Syria, in Sham… I asked them, saying: what do you think of Christians, he they said: I do not know. “You do not know?! You do not know?! Christians say that Issa [Jesus] is the son of God.” 02:19
Various shots of ISIS fighters believed to be Saudi firing sniper shots
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, conversation between fighters)

  • Did you see him? Fire at him

  • No, I did not see him.

  • I am relieved

  • Are you sure?

  • I saw the flag.

  • The flag? How did you see the flag?

02:43
Part of a video that shows a group of fighters, most of whom say they are from Saudi Arabia, inviting others to go to Syria and join them in jihad. This video was stored on a memory card that belonged to a Saudi ISIS fighter in Syria known as Abu Saadiya. It was obtained by Transterra Media through a third party without the fighter’s consent.
The exact location and date where the video was shot are unknown.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Thabet
“I call on all of my brothers in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to join jihad come to Sham [Syria].”

Unseen man: “Tell them that jihad is a duty and not optional.”
Abu Thabet: “Jihad is a duty not optional.”
Unseen man: “…and that our brothers in Syria need us to come here... something like that”

Fighter wearing black bonnet: “Takbir” [Invitation to say “God is greatest”]

-God is greatest!

-Takbir!

-God is greatest!

-Jihad!

-Jihad!

-Pride!

-Pride!

-Power!

-Power!

03:13
This is part of a video that features ISIS fighters rigging a vehicle with large improvised explosive devices. The main speaker in the video is believed to be Abu Dujana, a young ISIS military commander from the village of Zir in Deir ez-Zur province, believed to be appointed by the group as an emir, or ruler, of his village.
This explosive-rigged vehicle is believed to have been used in June 2014 in a suicide attack against leaders of Nusra Front and Ahrar al-Sham, two Islamist groups that are against ISIS. The speaker says that the vehicle will be used to avenge two commanders in Raqqa who were reportedly killed in January 2014.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Fighter believed to be Abu Dujana, an ISIS military commander
“Go slowly, brother. God is greatest! The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant, the Province of the Good [name given to Deir ez-Zur] is preparing the ‘Land Mig’ to attack [Ahrar?] al-Sham. They aggressors who killed our brothers. This ‘Land Mig’ will avenge [the death of] our brother Abu Baker al-Tounisi and Abu Rayyan al-Jazrawi, God willing. Your blood will not go to waste, with God almighty’s will.” “God is greatest!”

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Leaked Footage from ISIS Defector
Deir Ez Zour
By Transterra Editor
06 Jan 2015

This video collection offers a unique and unauthorized glimpse into the activities of ISIS in Syria. It features meetings led by a high-ranking official of ISIS who attempts to convince clan leaders in a Syrian village to pledge allegiance to the Islamic State. The video also includes scenes of ISIS fighters in military situations and relaxing.

NOTE: The video clips in this collection were obtained by Transterra Media from a source who received it from a member of ISIS who defected from the group. According to the source the videos were recorded in the town of Zir and other locations in Syria between January and June, 2014. Transterra Media cannot independently verify the accuracy of this content. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media (TTM) website does not in any way constitute endorsement by TTM of any claims or statements made in the video.

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Inside Hezbollah (Last version)
Nabatieh
By Cherine Yazbeck
30 Nov 2014

Shot list:
00:00 - 00:05
A wide shot shows a large billboard featuring portraits of Hezbollah fighters killed in Syria, with Hezbollah and Amal flags around it. The writing at the bottom of the billboard reads: “The Martyrs of Holy Defense.”
00:06 – 00:10
A medium shot shows details of the billboard.
00:11 – 00:14
A medium shot shows a billboard featuring Hezbollah’s Secretary-General Sayyid Hassan Nasrallah.
00:15 – 00:47
Interview with Ali Arab, a Hezbollah supporter, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below
A medium shot shows young Hezbollah scouts holding large portraits of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran; Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader; and Sayyid Abbas al-Mussawi, a Hezbollah Secretary-General assassinated by Israel.
00:48 – 01:15
Various shots show a large number of male Hezbollah supporters wearing uniforms inspired by Ashura and beating their chests as a sign of grief for Imam Hussein.
01:16 – 02:48
Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic / interview transcript below
Archive footage of Hezbollah parade in south Beirut; recent footage of children participating in Ashura commemoration in Nabatieh; archive footage of the Lebanese parliament; recent footage of missile launchers and Hezbollah fighters in military fatigues and as part Ashura parade in Nabatieh
02:49 – 03:37
Interview with participant in Ashura commemoration, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below

03:38 – 04:23
Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic / interview transcript below
Archive footage shows Hezbollah’s leader Hassan Nasrallah and fighters during a parade in south Beirut.

Interviews
00:15 – 00:47
Interview with Ali Arab, a Hezbollah supporter, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below
A medium shot shows young Hezbollah scouts holding large portraits of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran; Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader; and Sayyid Abbas al-Mussawi, a Hezbollah Secretary-General assassinated by Israel.
“It is normal that we are at risk from different parties and we should be aware of what is happening around us. It is true we are ready on all fronts against all of the Tafkiris [religious extremists], and even against Israel. This parade, particularly in Nabatieh, is a challenge to the Israelis, so they know we are not afraid of them. This is a big Jihad for us.” 01:16 – 02:48 Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic “Hezbollah defines itself as a resistance movement against Israeli occupation and against any danger that may affect Lebanon. It is a resistance movement that is also involved in politics. It is also an Islamic movement, but it does not practice Islam in politics. Hezbollah has an Islamic doctrine, but it does not apply it in the political agenda it advocates in the Lebanese political arena. It [Hezbollah] is also is merged with other active political parties and movements in the Lebanese scene. “Hezbollah’s legitimacy is derived, firstly, from its partisans [its popular support base]; and secondly from the Taif Agreement [agreement ending the Lebanese civil war], which states that Lebanon shall resist Israel in all possible ways. Its legitimacy is also derived from the Lebanese parliament, since Hezbollah has members in it; and from the Lebanese government, of which it is a part. All of the pervious and current governments have clearly recognized the legitimacy of Hezbollah as a pillar of resistance against Israel. However, the most important thing is that its [Hezbollah’s] legitimacy is obvious and logical because, whenever there is an occupation, there is the right of the population to resist the occupation.”

02:49 – 03:37
Interview with participant in Ashura commemoration, man, Arabic
“Of course, Hezbollah is legitimate as it has liberated the South along with other allied parties including the Amal Movement, the Syrian Social National Party (SSNP) and the Communist Party. “All parties have fought [against Israel]. “Hezbollah’s weapons are targeted against innocent civilians and are not to be used in [civilian] neighborhoods. “It never fought in the streets. It is not only me; everybody says that its weapon is the most honest. Without [its weapons], Lebanon would not exist and there would be no one ruling the country, not even a president of the republic. “On the contrary, the weapons must remain in the hands of Hezbollah, in the hands of the resistance. “More than that, it [Hezbollah] should be more powerful. “We need ten times more rockets. It shall remain and we will protect it.”

03:28 – 04:23
Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic
“Hezbollah has qualified and capable leaders in various domains: in politics, in military, social welfare, in security, in culture, in education and in economy. Hezbollah does not have to give a list of its leaders for security reasons, since the enemy, Israel, targets it. It only publishes the names of those who appear in the media. Aside from these [people], Hezbollah does not have to publish the names and tasks of its ranks.”

Hezbollah Fighters Defy ISIS and Israel on Ashura

Giant portraits of Hezbollah fighters killed in Syria tower over the main square in the Lebanese southern city of Nabatieh.
The commemoration of Ashura has taken place every year in this square. It is a tribute to Imam Hussein, the grandson of Prophet Mohammad and a central figure for Shiite Muslims who was killed more than 1,300 years ago. But Hezbollah’s engagement in defending the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has cast a heavy shadow on this religious occasion.
“We are here today to renew our allegiance to Imam Hussein, who died defending Islam, and also to show a good image of Islam, which other organizations, like ISIS, do not show,” said Ahmad Daifi, a Hezbollah militant in his twenties who was participating in organizing the event. The battle against ISIS and other groups that Hezbollah describes as “takfiri” or extremist has spilled into Lebanon. Explosions as well as attacks across the border, believed to be orchestrated by ISIS and Nusra Front, have shaken the fragile country during the past year. “It is normal that we are at risk from different parties and we should be aware of what is happening around us,” said Ali Arab, a Hezbollah supporter. Hezbollah and Amal, another major Shiite party, took special measures to secure the crowds against suicide bombings in Nabatieh and other predominantly Shiite areas in Lebanon during Ashura. In Beirut’s southern suburbs, Hezbollah special forces, fully clad in black, were seen for the time on the streets. But Hezbollah claims that the fight against militant groups originating in Syria has not distracted it from its war with Israel. In a speech commemorating Ashura, Hezbollah’s Secretary-General Sayyid Hassan Nasrallah said that his party is winning the fight in Syria and is also ready to retaliate against any Israeli attack. Hezbollah staged a military parade in front of a large crowd in Nabatieh. Dozens of fighters wearing military fatigues marched behind missile launchers mounted on military trucks. Hezbollah considers missiles the backbone of its arsenal in its fight against Israel, despite a Security Council resolution that put an end to a bloody war with Israel in 2006 and banned the party from stockpiling weapons near the border.
Hezbollah’s opponents, however, say that its ongoing military activities are actually a source of instability, not protection. Sunni and Christian major political forces have repeatedly demanded that the militant group hand over its weapons to the government after Israel withdrew most of its forces from south Lebanon in 2000. The party’s critics have also urged Hezbollah to stop fighting in Syria.
Habib Fayyad, an analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, reiterated the party’s official position in defense of its choice to maintain its weapons.
“Hezbollah’s legitimacy is derived, firstly, from [its popular support base], and secondly from the Taif Agreement [agreement ending the Lebanese civil war], which states that Lebanon shall resist Israel in all possible ways,” Fayyad said. “Its legitimacy is also derived from the Lebanese parliament, since Hezbollah has members in it, and from the Lebanese government, of which it is a part. All of the pervious and current governments have clearly recognized the legitimacy of Hezbollah as a pillar of resistance against Israel,” he added. Hezbollah has had members of the parliament since 1992, when the first elections were organized two years after the end of the 15-year-long civil war. In 2005, Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri was assassinated. The Syrian regime was seen as the culprit behind the attack and Syrian forces withdrew under international and popular pressure. Hezbollah has since participated in government coalitions, which is seen as way to protect its military activities. Four members of Hezbollah were later indicted of Hariri’s killing by an international tribunal, but the party refused to hand them over. Despite a claim that it does use weapons inside Lebanon, Hezbollah fought against the Sunni Future Movement in 2007 when the latter demanded that Hezbollah dismantles its secret telecommunication network. This exacerbated sectarian tensions – Hezbollah was accused of militarily occupying Beirut, a predominantly Sunni city. But Fayyad referred to the Israeli occupation of a small area called Shebaa farms in south Lebanon to say that Hezbollah still has to right to maintain its arsenal. “The most important thing is that [Hezbollah’s] legitimacy is obvious and logical because, whenever there is an occupation, there is the right of the population to resist the occupation,” he said.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

lunch break for the sandwich. Many of these children have survived more than two years under the bombings in cities like Homs or Aleppo

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Two brothers enjoying a class days after arriving to Lebanon

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa, more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents, can receive primary education and health care.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

A girl is engaged in the French lesson. They also study English and Arabic as co-official languages ​​of the Lebanese education system

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

School starts at 3 pm. There are very few teachers in the town and they work in the public school up in the morning.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa is one of three schools that hosts child refugees in the area. The other two schools are in no man's land territory

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Almost every day the children receive a caloric suplement as biscuits or sandwich and fruit juice during the afternoon

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The nursery. There are 70 Syrian children aged from 3 to 6 years divided in two classrooms

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in several activities such as the Christmas party, mother's day, etc.. They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Monthly medical examination at the public school. In general all the children are in good health

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa (Lebanon-Syrian border) Bekaa Valley
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in several activities such as the Christmas party, mother's day, etc.. They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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School for refugee children in Qaa (...
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in many cultural activities . They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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Center of Medical support in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
18 Jun 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Qaa citizens waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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Syrian refugees Kaa medical center
By Ferran Quevedo
06 Feb 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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ISIS in Syria: An Inside Look (Part 2)
Syria
By ttm contributor 31
07 Jan 2014

NOTE: The video clips in this collection were obtained by Transterra Media from a source who received it from a member of ISIS who defected from the group. According to the source the videos were recorded in the town of Zir and other locations in Syria between January and June, 2014.
Transterra Media cannot independently verify the accuracy of this content. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media (TTM) website does not in any way constitute endorsement by TTM of any claims or statements made in the video.

This video shows ISIS fighters engaged in different activities in unnamed locations in Syria.
00:00 - 01:21 (NO AUDIO) Fighters aiming a rifle through a hole in wall.
01:21 - 02:53 Fighters believed to be from Saudi Arabia appear joking and play wrestling inside a house.
02:54 - 04:31 Fighter aiming a rifle through a hole in wall.

Frame 0004
ISIS in Syria: An Inside Look (Part 1)
Syria
By ttm contributor 31
07 Jan 2014

NOTE: The video clips in this collection were obtained by Transterra Media from a source who received it from a member of ISIS who defected from the group. According to the source the videos were recorded in the town of Zir and other locations in Syria between January and June, 2014.
Transterra Media cannot independently verify the accuracy of this content. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media (TTM) website does not in any way constitute endorsement by TTM of any claims or statements made in the video.

This video shows ISIS fighters carrying out different activities in Deir ez-Zur province, Syria.
Fighters appear shooting, rigging a car with explosives, crossing a river to fight government forces in the Deir ez-Zur air base, and calling on others to join them in jihad.

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Syria Jihadists 04
Suruc
By Maciej Moskwa
12 Aug 2013

Syria, Idlib province near Maarrat An-Nouman, Feb 2013 Praying fighter in training base near city of Maarrat An Nouman. Fighters gathered there were involved in first siege of Wadi Deif Base. At the time of photographer presence there was at least one djihadist instructor openly claiming that he is there for sake of battle against non belivers, using term "kufar". Photo: Maciej Moskwa/TESTIGO

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Syria Jihadists 05
Suruc
By Maciej Moskwa
14 Mar 2013

Syria, Hama province, Kaalat Madiq March 2013. Second anniversary of Syrian Revolution. After prayings people gathered in front of mosque. Some of them bring flags of Nusra front and Ahrar Al Sham banners. Photo: Maciej Moskwa/TESTIGO