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Life in the Largest Syrian Refugee Ca...
Erbil
By Younes Mohammad
30 Mar 2015

March 30, 2015

Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan



Syrian refugees fled their country and arrived in Iraqi Kurdistan looking for assistance and a safe place to settle after the heavy clashes between the YPG and Al-Nusra front that took place in Rojava. The Kawrgosk refugee camp is currently the largest in Iraq but many of the refugees prefer to live on the outskirts of the city of Erbil. Iraq has recorded a total of 19, 844 Syrian refugees in the camps and aid is distributed to them by the UN, NGOs, and local and national bodies.

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Iraqi Refugees Desperate for Healthcare
Diyala
By mushtaq mohammed
09 Dec 2014

November 9, 2014
Khanaqin, Diyala, Iraq

Refugees in the UNHCR camp, near the town of Khanaqin, are living in life threatening conditions. They were promised free check ups and treatment by the local government and NGOs but have so far received none. Forced to flee their homes in Mosul and other parts of the Nineveh province, after ISIS took over vast areas of northern Iraq, many of the refugees require urgent medical attention or suffer from incurable diseases. In desperation, some are using what little money they have for appointments with independent doctors who charge 1500 Iraqi Dinars ($1.30) just for a check up.

Transcription:

Um Majed, refugee, (Woman, Arabic):
(02:06-02:28) "I am a refugee from al-Saadeya, al-Asreya village. We fled five months ago. We were not offered any doctors or medication. I am sick and I have a slipped disc in my spinal chord. I cannot afford to go to a doctor. My husband had a stroke two years ago, we have to buy his medications for 4000-5000 Dinar ($3-4) a box and we cannot afford it. Nobody has came to check on us."

Mustafa, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:06-03:33) "I am a sick man, I suffer from five illnesses. I have had a heart attack and a stroke, I have diabetes, hight blood pressure and asthma. I suffer from so many diseases and we are here in the camp. We have no medication. My five year-old son has diabetes, it started six months ago, ever since the problems started."

Abdulqader, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:59-04:22) "If a doctor comes here, he charges 1500 Dinar ($1.30), We ask him to minimize the charge, he says that he has official receipts form the health directory of Diala. For chronic diseases he charges 1500 Dinar. How can people afford that? The doctor writes the prescription, and without providing any medications, he charges 1500 Dinar. None of the refugees have an income to afford that."

Abu Mohamed, refugee, (Man, Arabic): (04:44-04:56) "I have been running to help my daughter who is sick. I took her to the health care unit, and they have no medication. I spent over 40,000 Dinar ($35) on my sick daughters, all of them are sick."

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World Largest Dolma Feast in Erbil (3...
By Stefanos
03 May 2014

Medes School in Erbil of Kurdistan (North Iraq) organized an Event With the ''Biggest dolma Feast'' for Syrian Refugees ! Also they hoped to Get in World Record Guinnes book with this event!!!

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (8...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Girls finish koran class at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (9...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A girl was injured when a bomb fell on her home in Hass, Syria and glass got into her arm. Now she and her family, who live in tents at Qah camp near the Turkish border, are among Syria's two million internally displaced people. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A man and woman in front of their family tent at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A woman and child look through a tent at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Laundry hung from olive trees at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A woman cooking at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to camps on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A girl wears broken shoes at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands are living in tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Boys fill up containers from a water truck at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass 85 kilometers southwest of Aleppo have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A boy is examined by Medecins Du Monde doctor at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (4...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A boy with shrapnel in his leg at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (5...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A widow and some of her eight children at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (6...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Newly arrived family with their possessions at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (7...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A girl in the women's bathroom at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

An FSA soldier at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (2...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A woman hangs laundry at Qah Camp on December 12, 2012, home to 3600 internally displaced people, many living in camps near the Turkish border. Most want to get into Turkey but have been denied. Turkey is currently constructing two new refugee camps but its struggling to keep up with demand. They have reported that the number of Syrians has exceeded 137,000.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (3...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Tomato and potato soup being cooked at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Taouergas: Damned Souls of the Libyan...
Janzur, Libya
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

Chaimza is 16 years old, she fled Taouerga, with her family. Lost her brother in the exodus in April 2011. Her father, brother, sisters, grand-mother and grand-father live in a room divided by sheets for intimacy.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.

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Syrian Refugees In Baalbek
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This Syrian woman has been in Lebanon for six months. She came from Homs.
The reason for her to leave was a very heavy shelling on their house, and abductions of people. She came with her whole family, which consists of five people.
They crossed the border in a legal way taking a taxi until Baalbek. It was at the time when crossing the border was still easy.
The life in Lebanon has been fine till now. They registered with" UNHCR" when they arrived. Now she is registering her children in school at the "Save the Children registration center."

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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SYRIAN REFUGEES IN LEBANON - Beirut E...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Beirut Editor's Picks
18 Sep 2012

This photo collection shows a few Syrian families who are waiting to register their children with the UNHCR and the organization, Save the Children, so they can attend school in Lebanon after crossing over from Syria.
The latest report from the UNHCR states that over 67,960 Syrian refugees are in Lebanon, with 49,653 registered and over 18,307 in contact with UNHCR. While most children will be able to attend school in Lebanon, there have been many issues with refugees being denied because they lack proper paperwork. Another issue that is increasingly become more of a problem is that of child trauma, as reports say almost every child has seen someone killed and there are no resources available to provide counseling for the children, many of which are suffering from PTSD.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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Syrian refugees at the Sawa Registrat...
Baalbek, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
17 Sep 2012

As Syrian refugee parents wait to register their children for school in Lebanon, the children play in the special play room. The Sawa registration Center is situated in Baalbek, and was set up in collaboration with UNHCR and Save the Children. There are 48,925 Syrian refugees registered with UNHCR in Lebanon, with more than 18,000 on a waiting list. 51% of them are children. Save the Children provided a Summer Accelerated Learning Program & Scholarship Program, that encompassed 1,208 children until now. Another 1,292 are supposed to join at the beginning of school year.