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Deforestation in Malawi
Lilongwe
By Nathalie Bertrams
07 Dec 2017

For the past year, Malawi’s department of forestry has been cooperating with the army in a desperate bid to stem the illegal logging that is depleting the country’s forests at a rate of 2.8% per year. Surging demand for charcoal in Malawi’s cities is the prime driver of deforestation here: around 54% of urban women now use this “black gold” for cooking, according to the government.

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Lilongwe
By Nathalie Bertrams
03 Feb 2017

Carrying a load of 150 kilos of charcoal on his bicycle, Handle Marino has been pedaling all through the night to reach Malawi's capital Lilongwe, where a wholesale buyer awaits the goods.

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French Fighter Joins Kurdish Militia ...
Outskirts of Ras al-Ayn (Serekaniye)
By Bedir
21 May 2015

Ras al-Ayn (Serekaniye), Syria

A French fighter, who introduced himself as 'Roj William,' explains in an interview why he joined the Syrian Kurdish YPG militia's fight against ISIS. The interview was conducted in French.

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Ingenious Invention in Besieged Easte...
Douma, Eastern Ghouta, Syria
By Jawad Arbini
12 May 2015

May 13, 2015
Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Two years of being under siege has forced the citizens of Eastern Ghouta, near Damascus, to come up with ingenious inventions in order to survive.
This video shot in Douma, shows a heater invented by 60 year old Abu Yassin that uses solar energy to boil water.

Abu Yassin previously worked as a glazier but his business has dropped since the 2011 uprising. Nowadays he is using the glass and an unused satellite dish to build a solar concentration heater.

Using small pieces of glass and mirrors glued to the surface of the satellite dish, Abu Yassin directs the dish to face the sunlight which is reflected by the mirrors to hit the kettle or the cooking pot that sits in a basket in front of the dish.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Yassin

03:32- 06:03

Q: How did you come up with the idea of making a solar cooker?
A: After the siege, we started to look for ways to substitute gas. I saw this on the internet but nobody had applied it. I tried it and we found out that it was excellent. We tried it and it worked.
We used it to heat water and cook. People started demanding it. When we showed it, it was in high demand. People started to bring small pieces of mirrors that they had at home, and I showed them how to cut them, paste them together and place a basket. There is high demand for this.

04:17
Q: How do you make the solar cooker? How does it work?
A: The mirrors are cut in squares so that they would have similar shape and they are glued to the satellite dish using silicon or al-Shuala glue. Then you need to put thick metal bars to hold the cooking pot. This is it. It is simple.

04:43
Q: Let us talk about how long it takes to cook something. What have you cooked with it?
A: We have cooked everything; all dishes. There is not anything that we did not cook with this. It takes about half an hour to cook something. It is the same time it takes to cook something using a gas cooker.
Q: What did you cook?
A: We cooked fava beans with rice, pees with rice, mujaddara [a dish prepared with lentils]; all dishes. There is not anything that we did not cook with this.

05:13
Q: Tell us how your idea became a commercial project. How many clients were able to use this invention?
A: When I made this people clients started to tell their relatives or others who have seen it and I started to receive more customers through them. So far I made 20 or 25 dishes.
Of course, this helps to break the siege; you can use something instead of gas by employing simple tools. Anyone who has mirrors we cut them for him. It does not cost anything. The cost is very low and usually people would have a satellite dish. The customer brings the satellite dish and the mirrors. I only charge for cutting, which is not expensive.”

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 09
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Apr 2015

German Acevedo, 23, from La Paz province, El Salvador, prepares the lunch for his other 10 housemates from Fundacio Putxet, in Barcelona.
German arrived to Europe in summer 2012, running away from the gangs ("pandilleros") in San Salvador. The Spanish Government rejected his asylum request, but he is remaining in the country and attending courses to becomes a social worker in the future. He does not want to go back to El Salvador because he is afraid of being killed by the gangs.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 11
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Apr 2015

German Acevedo, 23, from La Paz, El Salvador, chats with the cook Marifa in the kitchen, during the preparation of the lunch for his other 10 housemates from Fundacio Putxet, in Barcelona.
German arrived to Europe in summer 2012, running away from the gangs ("pandilleros") in San Salvador. The Spanish Government rejected his asylum request, but he is remaining in the country and attending courses to becomes a social worker in the future. He does not want to go back to El Salvador because he is afraid of being killed by the gangs.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 10
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Apr 2015

German Acevedo (back left), 23, from El Salvador, shares the lunch with (back center and right) Saihou and Houssein, two of his 10 housemates from Fundacio Putxet, in Barcelona, and (foreground) two staff members.
German arrived to Europe in summer 2012, running away from the gangs ("pandilleros") in San Salvador. The Spanish government rejected his asylum request, but he is remaining in the country and attending courses to becomes a social worker in the future. He does not want to go back to El Salvador because he is afraid of being killed by the gangs.

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Desperate Living Conditions in Rebel-...
Jobar
By abdalmanamissa
26 Feb 2015

Jobar, Syria
February 26, 2015

The Damascus suburb of Jobar has been transformed into a devastated ghost town after more than more than two years of heavy battles between government and opposition fighters have failed to bring decisive victory to either side.

The very few civilians who remain in the neighborhood gather broken doors and furniture from wrecked homes to provide firewood.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

R-L pan of destroyed building
Traveling of road
Traveling of tunnel
Traveling of three children amid destruction
Various traveling of streets
Various of man chipping wood
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of two women walking amide destroyed buildings
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of destroyed building
Wide/ zoom in of two children carrying wood
Various of men sitting around a fire
Wide of fighters
Close-up of axe chopping wood
Wide/ zoom out of men carrying large bags

04:00 – 04:47

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, a fighter in Jobar Neighborhood

“As you can see, there are no civilians. There is no firewood nor any other means of heating. There is no electricity or diesel. All of this disappeared a long time ago. [NAT Sound: Heavy gunshot]. People come under shelling and shooting as they gather firewood. They take wood from wrecked houses and cut down trees – anything that can be used to provide heating because there is no diesel. People of all ages are doing what it takes to manage. They come all the way from over there. God, not us, is protecting them. They gather some firewood and then leave. The situation is extremely tragic. It is more difficult for civilians than it is for us.“

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed fighter in Jobar Neighborhood
04:48 – 05:36

“As you can see, dear brother, the situation is deplorable. People suffer from the lack of fuel and other basic necessities needed for heating and cooking. People are using wood from homes, which, as you can see, have been bombed, especially in Jobar. There are many destroyed homes. In general, Jobar has entirely been destroyed. People use any available wood from doors, window shutters and furniture. Everything is ruined and people go out to gather wood to provide heating for their children and prepare food. People undergo a lot of risk while doing this, under shelling from rockets and from warplanes.”

Wide of smoke rising as a result of bombing

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Sahrawi Dreams: The Western Sahara's ...
Tindouf, Algeria
By Ferran Garcia
24 Feb 2015

Sun, sand and patience abound for natives of the Western Sahara, many of whom have survived the last 38 years in the Algerian hamada thanks to international aid. In 1976, the independence movement, the Polisario Front, proclaimed the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (RASD) in what is today called the Western Sahara just as Spain, the former colonial power, withdrew from the territory. This land has since been the subject of dispute between Mauritania and Morocco, the country which occupies almost all of it to date.

On 12 January 2007, Nicaragua joined the African Union and the 45 world nations which recognise the sovereignty of RASD. No European country either recognises the RASD as a sovereign entity, or the annexation carried out by Morocco. Meanwhile, 260,000 inhabitants of the Western Sahara are currently living in an effective no-man’s land claimed by Morocco. There, local institutions have no power and are not given any public assistance.

Neighbouring Algeria, a firm defender of Western Saharan independence, provides refuge to 160,000 Sahrawis in the desert surrounding the Algerian province of Tindouf. Isolated from the rest of the world, they depend on what the European NGO lorries take from the port of Oran to the south of the country. Here, a generation raised abroad is beginning to question how long it will be before a referendum is held. Many of these young men do not rule out returning to arms.

ARTICLE UPON REQUEST

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"

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Living Conditions “Extremely Bad” in ...
Jarabulus
By TTM Contributor 34
13 Feb 2015

Jarabulus, Syria
February 13, 2015

This video offers a rare glimpse of daily life in Jarabulus, an ISIS-controlled Syrian town on the border with Turkey, located around 120 km northwest of Aleppo.
Video contains interviews with two anonymous residents who complained about their economic conditions, saying that basic commodities are unaffordable while there are few employment opportunities.

The footage, which was shot secretly, shows what is believed to be ISIS headquarters destroyed by international coalition-led airstrikes. It also shows local residents in markets and agriculture fields inside and near Jarabulus.

Fighters from the Nusra Front, considered the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, took over the town in 2013 and later pledged allegiance to ISIS. More than 200,000 Kurds and Arabs in Jarabulus and the surrounding villages have lived under ISIS since early 2014.

The name of the contributor has been withheld for security reasons.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Traveling of fields/ road sign “Jarablus”
Wide of destroyed bridge on river
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of destroyed buildings
Wide of ISIS religious teachings
Traveling of street
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of official printed announcements by ISIS posted outside a building/ close up of seal “The Islamic State, Department of Agriculture, Jarabulus District”
L-R pan of field
Wide of children sliding down a hill
Various of boat rowing in the Euphrates River
Wide of planted vegetables
Wide/ L-R pan of orchard
Various of sheep grazing
Close-up of a person cutting firewood
Various of woman cooking using a stove
Various of a woman milking a cow
Various of oil containers for sale on the roadside
Medium of man at fish market
Various of vegetables for sale at market
Wide of field and sheep herd
Traveling of people in an outdoor market
Various of clothes and shoes for sale
Various of spices for sale
Various of market
Various of crowd at market
Various of food items for sale
Wide/ traveling inside health center

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
09:54 – 12:16

“The situation is not good. I cannot say that we are comfortable. Our situation is very bad. A diesel barrel costs 20,000 [Syrian pounds]. How can we afford it? A gas canister costs 4,000 [Syrian pounds] and a liter of kerosene costs 225 pounds. A pack of bread costs 130 pounds. How can we afford this? I have two young men who are unemployed. Where can they go? “The [Islamic] State is good. They have caught the debauched and the thieves who have hurt people, but they provide electricity and water for only two hours [a day]. For more than a year, people have barely seen electricity. It is provided during two hours but the grid is overloaded and the current is interrupted after half an hour. The bakery was not functioning; they repaired it but bread is expensive. We cannot afford it. I bake bread myself.

“As for warplanes… Our houses have been fractured. These countries have formed a coalition against us. We live in a border town. Bombing goes on night and day.

“They should have bombed the tyrant who has deprived us of everything. He has ruined everything. Whenever our children went out to look for work they were accused of being criminals and caught. All our young men have been put in jail. What can we do? The situation is bad.

“We use firewood. We had olive trees but we cut them down and burned them in the stove to have heat in this cold weather.

“I have a cow. Animal feed is expensive. A kilogram of hay costs 50 pounds. A bale of barely that contains 40 kg costs 2,700 pounds. We need this cow to feed us. All the people who have cattle suffer the same crisis that we do. It is not only me; all of us suffer a bad situation. We wish that we die. There is not a single house that has not been fractured due to warplanes.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
12:17 – 13: 19

“Conditions under the Islamic State are extremely bad. Under the Islamic State, a barrel of diesel costs more than $100. A ton of firewood costs 22,000 [pounds]. This crisis has never been witnessed before.

“Nothing has improved under the Islamic State. Everything has deteriorated. They should create employment for the people. The people work in agricultural lands, which do not provide any revenue. We have abandoned our land. Not all the plots are being cultivated. People have cut down olive groves and used them as firewood. The situation is extremely miserable. There are no services and foreign countries are not providing aid. The Islamic State is in control of the situation. Turkey has closed the border and aid cannot reach people. The situation is very bad under the Islamic State.”

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Life Along The Railway (9 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A woman cooks in front of her house, a makeshift tent right next to railroad tracks in a slum area in Bangladesh's capital Dhaka. It is home to more than 10 million people, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Hundreds of people live beside the railroad in the Kawran Bazar slum, where residents face dire conditions in the unsanitary environment. Dakha, Bangladesh, June, 2013.

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Life Along The Railway (12 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A family is cooking right in front of their house, a makeshift tent right next to the railroad tracks.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (4 of 11)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A family is cooking between railway tracks outside their makeshift home where they are living in a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Eating bats is a delicacy in mountain...
Igbaras, Iloilo, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
05 May 2013

Life in the far reaching mountainous areas of Iloilo is hard. Transportation is not widely accessible and people live a simple life. Due to poverty and scarce sources of food, as in older days, people eat bats to survive. Fruit bats are considered a delicacy. Poi bat and Adobong Paniki, deep fried bat with soy sauce, is a thrilling comestible for exotic food lovers.

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Mulanje
By Nathalie Bertrams
18 Mar 2013

Rose Kandodo from Nessa village in Malawi is cooking the staple food nsima on an improved cook stove.

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Dead Cities 7
Syria, Idlib province
By Maciej Moskwa
16 Mar 2013

Refugees from Jebl Zawiyya. Access to food is very difficult and is one of the biggest problems for IDPs who are faced with hunger and sicknesses.

Syria, Shensharah. March 17, 2013.

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (23 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

A family prepares dinner in the Kibera slum.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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Living Space Inside A Shelter
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A room for washing and cooking inside a makeshift Syrian shelter.

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Refugee Kitchen
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

This shared kitchen in a partially constructed apartment houses Syrian refugees. All the cooking utensils and cookware has been supplied by the local Lebanese community.

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Cooking
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
17 Dec 2012

A displaced woman from Timbuktu cooks food in the room of her host family in Bamako to later sell at the market. Many displaced find it hard to make ends meet as they are not able to resume their normal activities and livelihoods they had in the north.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (3...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Tomato and potato soup being cooked at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (5 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Zaatari Refugee Camp: A break In The ...
Mafraq, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
08 Nov 2012

For women in Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp, cooking in a kitchen has been a way to restore a small sense of normalcy to their lives. Though they must sometimes wait in line to cook their food, preparing food together gives the women a chance to talk, take a break from their mundane life inside and outside the tent, or even smoke a cigarette in privacy. November 8, 2012.

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Zaatari Refugee Camp: An Infant's Bur...
Mafraq, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
30 Oct 2012

A brother in Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp holds his infant sister in his arms, whose hand and arm was seriously burned in their tent when she was crawling in the tent and knocked over a pot of boiling tea. October 29, 2012

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Zaatari Refugee Camp: Waiting For A K...
Mafraq, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
30 Oct 2012

The newly-built kitchens in Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp have been something many women point to as a redeeming quality of the camp, finally giving them an outlet to provide for their families and enjoy the communal atmosphere among other women cooking. But though many refugees are able to use these kitchens built for the now more than 40,000-strong population in the camp, there are still are some that are not yet functional. October 29, 2012.

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Zaatari Refugee Camp: Cooking Outside...
Mafraq, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
29 Oct 2012

The newly-built kitchens in Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp have been something many women point to as a redeeming quality of the camp, finally giving them an outlet to provide for their families and enjoy the communal atmosphere among other women cooking. But though many refugees are able to use these kitchens built for the now about 40,000-strong population in the camp, there are still are some that are not yet functional. October 29, 2012.

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Zaatari Refugee Camp: Neighborhood Ba...
Mafraq, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
29 Oct 2012

Though these women have a functional kitchen in their “neighborhood” in Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp, Masoura, 38, and her two other neighbors from Daraa gather about once a week, depending on the weather, to make their own bread on a larger stove. After they cook the bread, they split the pile into three, each taking their share for their family. October 29, 2012.

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Life in Malawi 18
Blantyre, Southern Region, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
07 Dec 2011

In zingwangwa, the electricity is unreliable so many people cook on charcoal. Cutting trees fro charcoal results in deforestation.
Zingwangwa is a low to middle income township of Blantyre, the biggest commercial city of Malawi.

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What a Trip! Cycling from Germany to ...
Germany, Tschech Republik, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore
By Maximilian Semsch
02 May 2008

In 2008 Maximilian Semsch at the age of 24 cycled from Munich to Singapore to find out more about himself and to go on a real adventure, as life must be more than just working. He did the journey all by himself, without the help of a professional camera team. As there was no one to talk to, his camera became his best friend during the trip. His journey started in May 2008 in his hometown Munich. His route took him through Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine into Russia and further on to Kazakhstan. Semsch then did hit rock bottom, as he was refused a visa and couldn't enter China. After days of consideration he did decide to skip China and flew to Thailand. His route through south-east Asia took him from Thailand to Cambodia back into Thailand and via Malaysia he finally reached Singapore, after 211 days and 13.500km on his bike. Semsch recorded everything on his trip. The nice and helpful people he bumped into, drinking vodka in Russia with complete strangers and its aftermath of a hangover the next day but he also tells about his fight against loneliness, heat and extreme headwind. He always does it in a very personal way that gives the audience the feeling of sitting on the back of his bike.