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Troops Loyal to Libya Dawn Launch Off...
Sirte
By laura.lesevre
17 Mar 2015

March 17, 2015
Sirte, Libya

Islamist troops loyal to Libya Dawn, a self appointed government based in Tripoli, have been instructed to drive ISIS out of Sirte. The 166 Brigade and militias from Misrata began their offensive against ISIS in Sirte, a coastal city that used to be a stronghold of Muammar Gaddafi.

The allied Islamist fighters have not yet been able to enter the city despite launching an offensive on Saturday March 14, 2015. They claim that Gaddafi loyalists are in control of the city and are now fighting under the ISIS flag.

In this video Gian Micalessin, an Italian veteran war reporter with more than 30s years of experience in war journalism who has covered Libya since 2011 revolution, visits the front lines with the allied fighters.

A longer rough cut is available on request.

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Body of Killed Tunisian ISIS Commande...
Misrata
By Mohamed Lagha
17 Mar 2015

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

Misrata, Libya
March 17, 2015

Video shows the body of slain ISIS commander Ahmed al-Ruwaysi, also known as Abu Zakariya al-Tunisi, who was killed in Libya during clashes with forces from the Islamist Libya Dawn coalition near Sirte.

The identity of the dead body was confirmed by Ismail Shukri, a spokesperson for Libya Dawn.

An obituary published by ISIS mentioned that Ruwaysi had planned and carried out the assassinations of two prominent Tunisian leftist activists, Mohammed Brahmi and Chokri Belaid.

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ISIS Checkpoints in Libyan Port
Derna, Libya
By MENA Desk
15 Mar 2015

Fighters affiliated to ISIS have set up checkpoints on Sunday 15 March both within and at the entrances of the eastern Libyan port of Derna. According to eyewitnesses, each checkpoint is manned by 10-15 fighters equipped with Kalashnikov rifles and hand grenades, as well as 4x4 vehicles with mounted anti-aircraft machine guns. Different groups of fighters take shifts in guarding the checkpoints for specific periods of time. The head of the sentries is equipped with a walkie-talkie. The fighters confiscate any liquor and tobacco they find and destroy it on the spot. People deemed guilty of violating Islamic law are taken to the offices of the Islamic police inside the city. When aircraft are spotted flying overhead the fighters disperse, fearing their checkpoints might be targeted.

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Car Bomb Targets Anti-ISIS Task Force...
Misrata
By Bujezia
15 Mar 2015

March 15, 2015
Misrata, Libya

In a suburb of Misrata, Libya's third largest city and 187km east of Tripoli, a car bomb exploded in front of a camp of faction calling itself the 166 Battalion. According to local sources, one person was killed and several others were wounded. The 166 Battalion has been tasked with fighting ISIS in Sirte, where clashes broke out on Saturday 14 March. Video shows the aftermath of the car bomb which went off late on Sunday night.

Misrata is the power base of the Libya Dawn umbrella group which seized Tripoli in August, forcing the internationally recognized government east to Tobruk.

A group with ties to ISIS also claimed responsibility for several other high profile attacks, including that on the Corinthia Hotel in which six foreigners were killed. They have promised to retaliate with further violence if they continue to be attacked.

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Libyan Traditional Dress Day
Tripoli
By Bujezia
13 Mar 2015

The Libyan Ministry of Culture and Civil Society in Libya announced the 13th of March as the National Day for the Libyan Traditional Dress, and the held an event in the capital Tripoli where hundreds of young people dressed up in traditional costume and walked around the city. A large ceremony was held in the Martyr square, with performances from folkloric and traditional Libyan music acts.

Hundred of the youngsters danced and enjoyed their day out in the city center, welcoming the short break from the conflicts which the country has seen over the recent months. However violence in Libya continues; most recently a police station was bombed not far from the city center on Sunday 15 March with ISIS have claiming responsibility.

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Libya prisoners
Misrata
By Bujezia
12 Mar 2015

On Thursday 12 March the Misrata prison released 19 prisoners of war who had been detained since the fall of Gaddafi in 2011. They are the first to be released after completing their sentences. The Minister of Justice of the opposition government based in Tripoli have visited the prison and allowed relatives and friends to visit the prisoners.

The minister also toured the prison and talked to a number of prisoners about their living conditions, inquiring into their health and whether any human rights abuses occurred. Just back from Geneva, he agreed to support humanitarian missions to improve prison conditions and prevent any human rights violations or abuses toward to the prisoners.

soundbite (Arabic)
Mostafa Al-Gleib, Minister of Justice in Tripoli: We all have to support each other and stand by justice in order to enforce justice and empower its ability to punish criminals, help victims and provide equality and enforce justice. This is an honest demand and it’s a fundamental one for all the patriots and free men of Libya.
soundbite (Arabic)
Abdulrahman Al-Shakshak, Head of the Local Council in Tawrgh: We're working together for the greater good and, as you know, the situation in Libya dictates that we move in all directions. When we were in Geneva, I met with the Misrata local council and we agreed to allow visits to prisoners to overview their situations and let people know the conditions they are living in.

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ISIS Show Off in Derna
Derna
By MENA Desk
28 Feb 2015

February 2015
Derna, Libya

Video shot by an eyewitness at the end of February 2015 showing ISIS militants parading through the streets of the northeastern Libyan city of Derna.

The fighters drive in convoys sounding their horns and showing off their guns and flags on a public highway in central Derna as they pass by civilian cars.

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Anti-Terrorism Protest in Benghazi Ca...
Benghazi
By Mohammad Salama
20 Feb 2015

February 20, 2015
Benghazi, Libya

Scores of Libyans staged an anti-terrorism demonstration in al-Keesh Square Benghazi on Friday, February 20, 2015.

The demonstrators called for the backing of the Libyan army and for the international community to support the Tobruk based government's demand at the UN Security Council to lift the ban on arms sales, and to provide the army with the necessary support to fight terrorism.

The demonstrations came following a triple suicide bomb attack in the eastern town of al-Qubbah, which claimed more than 40 lives.

The attacks were claimed by the 'Islamic State' in retaliation, they said, for the air strikes carried out on the IS stronghold of Derna earlier this week.

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Egyptian Airstrikes on Derna Claim th...
Derna
By MENA Desk
16 Feb 2015

February 16, 2015
Derna, Libya

At least seven civilians including three children were killed on February 16, 2015, when Egyptian jets bombed suspected ISIS affiliates in the eastern Libyan city of Derna, Amnesty International said, citing eyewitnesses.

The video shows the airstrikes hitting Eastern Shiha, a suburb of Derna, and medics attempting to resuscitate children wounded in the airstrikes without success. It also shows civilians walking amongst the rubble of the damaged buildings.

The Egyptian airstrikes on Libyan soil are a retaliation to an ISIS video showing the beheading of 21 Egyptian Copts in Libya.

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Aftermath of ISIS Hostage Situation i...
Tripoli
By hamzaturkia
28 Jan 2015

January 28, 2015
Tripoli, Libya

Video shows the aftermath of an attack on the Corinthia hotel in Tripoli Libya, popular with foreigners and diplomats. Local sources indicate that nine people were killed, five of whom were foreigners.

According to eye witnesses a bomb went off outside the hotel after three gunmen entered the building. They said that the three men were aged between 20 and 30 and were clean shaven.

They took one hostage and fought with security forces before detonating explosive belts, killing themselves and their hostage.

A twitter account with links to ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack.

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Hostages Taken in the Corinthia Hotel...
Tripoli
By hamzaturkia
27 Jan 2015

January 27, 2015
Tripoli, Libya

Video shows Libyan Special Deterrent Force, staging outside the Corinthia Hotel in Tripoli where gunmen are holding hostages.

According to the Transterra contributor a bomb exploded outside the hotel after the gunmen entered the building. He says that according to witnesses there are at least 3 gunmen aged between 20 and 30 and clean shaven.

The video also shows what is believed to be a security camera photo of one of the gunmen inside the hotel.

A Twitter account linked to Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack.

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Libyan Catholic Bishop on Christians ...
Benghazi
By Mohammad Salama
22 Jan 2015

.January 22, 2015

Benghazi, Libya

The Bishop of Benghazi, Celeste Almagro, may be the last remaining Christian in his congregation left in Benghazi. Father Almagro says he is staying in Libya even though all the other nuns and other priests have left the country. There was a sizable quantity of Christian immigrants living in Libya, around 17,000 were Filipinos, and they lived along side the locals without any trouble. This all changed with the uprising against Muammar Gadaffi in 2011. Since the fall of Gadaffi’s government, the country has spiraled out of control, with radical Islamist groups growing in strength and making the country more dangerous for all religious minorities. Our contributor interviewed the bishop who was at the time sheltering in an unknown location for his own safety.

Transcription:

“I am bishop Celeste Almagro from Malta and I have been in Libya already for 27 years. It is a long time since I came as a priest in Tripoli. At that time, there were many Filipinos, there were about 17,000 so I came as an English speaking priest in order to help with the prayers of the church, these people who are Christian. And as I said I spent as parish priest and vicar of the bishop 9 years in Tripoli. We were going practically everywhere except Brega on the east and Ra’s lanuf in the east in order to conduct the prayers according to our way. Then in 1997, when the country, when Libya established diplomatic relations with the Vatican, I was appointed Bishop of Benghazi of this area, because the area is very vast, beginning from Brega it goes up to Tubruq, so it could not be administrated by Tripoli, it was already too far.

“So I came here in 1997, 17 years ago almost, and we took the permits necessary, we renovated the church; we painted, made it more welcoming because it needed a good refurbishing. Also the Catholic community was very numerous up until a few years ago. We had a lot to do. We were always going somewhere. There were also the sisters perhaps you know that there were sisters in the hospital of Jamahiriya, there were Polish sisters here in the children’s hospital, there were sisters in Tubruq, sisters in Derna, in Al Bayda and also in Al Marj. So we had a lot of travelling and coming and going back at the same time. In Al Bayda and Derna and Tubruq we had a priest resident with the “sorellas” (sisters) they call them. So we were organizing this way very much in demand, travelling and travelling without stop. We used to go to Brega by the company plane to the region. Now we have come to this state when the sorellas (sisters) are no more because many of them were over aged, but others were recalled because they were afraid by their superiors, so we have remained one priest with me and another one in Al Bayda.

“And here we are after this waiting for priests to return, because even in the normal life of the people, there are time for prayer, their regular attendance has been distributed so they need also the spiritual support of their religion which is Christian for us. And it is our daily and constant prayer and wish for peace to return. Now we do not have more bombings like before, hope has increased. Inshallah it will be not long before calm and security will be the order of the day and we will be able to return to our church in Benghazi because we had to leave very urgently on 4th November, taking nothing with us because there was no time, I did not know what was happening, maybe the soldiers were approaching. So took what we had about us, the necessary things and off we went with the hope of returning within three days. And we are still here, now it is 22nd of January and we are still here in this place out of normal residence which is a handicap also for those people because the people all come from different hospitals for the prayer in Servia Moreno and Omerta Gatap and we are not there. So it is a painful for them and for us, that is why in our prayer meetings, the priority is our prayer for peace, for the benefit of the country, for the benefit of the citizens, of the families and for the benefits also for us because we are living like a family in our own way.

“We have remained here because we had a great pressure from our families to return because they were worried about us, our families especially, and also from our embassy but we preferred to remain with the people and also with those when we had the nuns, they did not go immediately but remained as long as they could to be with the people with the war three years ago. Three years ago when there was the war, there were massive repatriation plans, there was a ship one time took 1,400 Filipinas, others went by air to their country, but we remained here to be with the people, with your people, with the sisters helping them as nurses and giving witness to our love and our dedication to the country also, which was our country because we are living here. And this again happened now and we remained again, we did not fly away, many have been repatriated, because the families were terrified because of the war, and it is reasonable, so many Filipinos and Africans also, because we have many Africans, left but also there are some who remained also for the benefit of the country to help in the hospitals because it is important that they should stay. Hoping as we do to rejoice when finally everything will be settled as I said for the benefit of the country, for the benefit of the families, for the benefits of us all.” (08:56)

(08:57) “I remember when the sisters were told by their superiors that they had to return, they wept because some of them were over 45 years here, they came when they were very young, especially the Italian ones so it was heart breaking for them to leave the hospital especially Jamahiriya here, children and the other hospitals in Al Bayda, Al Marj and Tubruq, because they felt their country is here for a lifetime. So as a conclusion, I would like to say how much we are also enduring with the people, the disadvantages brought by war, and it is our prayer for the country, for the people, among who we have so many friends also, especially the neighbours and those who know us, we are like a family, and inspire and pray and hope for peace so that will be our great relief from the tragedies of war because war is always a tragedy, and I hope it is not far, the night is dark but the sun will rise God willing. Thank you very much.”

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Libyan Army Defends the Country's Lar...
Sidra, Libya
By TTM albattat
22 Dec 2014

December 22, 2014
Sidra, Libya

“The Oil Installations Guards” in the Libyan Army have deployed artillery and military vehicles in the port of Sidra, east of Tripoli, to defend Libya's largest oil depot. Libyan Army soldiers and fighters loyal to former general Khalifa Haftar have been engaged in heavy clashes with the “Dawn of Libya” militia which launched a military offensive at the beginning of last week, to control the oil rich area which includes Sidra, Ras Lanuf and Briqa in the north of the country.

Interview:

(00:58) Waniss Bukhmada, The Commander of the Saiiqa Special Forces, (man, Arabic):

"The World should take a strong position regarding what is happening now in Libya.. The World should be clear and explicit with the Libyan people that is asking for freedom, security and stability. The Libyan people is not satisfied with what is happening.

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon

December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, woman) Siham Jumaa

(00:07) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport (00:13).

(00:14) When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now (00:28).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Skype between Palestinian refugee Ibrahim al-Khatib and a people smuggler in Sudan.

(00:29) We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous (00:34).

(00:36) You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there is not any other road (00:59).

(01:00) We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy (01:07).

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon
December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets
2 Various of children
3 Various of woman at home
4 Various of children playing in the street
5 C/S of Yasser Arafat’s photos on camp wall
6 M/S of streets in camps
7 Various of streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Lama Baqlouni

(00:41) This is my son Mustafa, he is 15 years old. He is imprisoned in Egypt now. And this is my daughter Nisrine, she is also detained with her brother in Egypt (00:57).

(00:58) My children are orphans now, their father died. We need someone to help them get out of prison. It has been two months, they are tired and sick. We need someone to help them move to another country so they can continue their lives as normal people (01:15).

(01:17) We left Lebanon to Homs where I got a smuggler’s number. I called him and he told me to take them to Hama with $250 for each. We went to Hama and paid the amount needed, and then he took them to Turkey, where they stayed in a hotel. We got the contacts of smugglers who will be able to take them to Italy. The fees ranged between $5,000 and $6,000 for each child, depending on the smuggler. We asked people for money – people we knew and others that we did not. They took them to the Turkish coasts to be transported to Italy, and made them wait from 7PM to 1AM (02:15).

(02:18) They were supposed to take them first in a small boat, and then move them to a bigger ship. They were stopped by the coast guards and imprisoned in Turkey for a day, on condition to make them sign a pledge that they will never get out of Turkey again. They were freed the next day. On the same day they got out of jail, the smuggler said they will try to leave Turkey one more time. They got on board on the same day, but the captain kept going in circles in the sea for five days (02:59).

(03:10) They arrived to an island and the captain ordered them to leave the boat. They did not agree at first, but he told them he will get them accommodations in Egypt, and they were threatened by guns and knives. My daughter told me that they got very scared. Everybody started to scream, and they threw four men in the sea (03:27).

(03:35) Syrians were sent back to Turkey but Palestinians were allowed to go there (03: 39).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Siham Jumaa

(04:07) This is my husband’s passport, he sent it to the smuggler to get a visitor’s visa to Sudan (04:16).

(04:32) We lost our house and everything because of the war in Syria. Life is hard here in Lebanon, we should pay a monthly rent for our house and life is expensive. This is the main reason why my husband decided to do this trip, and if I had money, I would do the same thing (04:49).

(04:52) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport. He travelled to Dubai first and then to Sudan. When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now. His plan was to go to Italy after Libya, either from the coasts of Benghazi or Tripoli. He paid $4,000 for the whole trip from Beirut to Italy. But I heard nothing from him since he got to Libya (05:58).

(06:05) I do not have money. I sold all my jewelry and my wedding ring, and I even had to beg for money from people so we can get the 3000USD for his trip. Once he arrived to Libya, his brothers donated 1000USD for his trip. The whole trip cost $4,000 (06:21).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Skype conversion between Ibrahim al-Khatib and smuggler based in Sudan

(07:18) Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to travel. Smuggler: Welcome, I will help you
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Can I please know what the process is? I am a Syrian Palestinian, and I am in Lebanon.
Smugglers: Where would you like to go?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to go to Europe; I want to know the procedures, and how much it costs. This is the most important thing. We have no money and I have to borrow money if I want to travel. You have to give me discount and help me, please.
Smuggler: The person who told you about me, did he not tell you where I can take you?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: The person who told me about you went to Sudan. He went from Sudan to Libya and then to Italy.
Smuggler: Are you seriously intending to do it?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I am, I am asking about the expenses because I have a wife and children and I want to know [how much money] I should leave for them and how much to take with me, I want to know about the road, if it is safe, or not, and how this whole thing is going to be arranged. I want to know how I am going to give you the money, or my passport. Will I receive a visa, or not? I do not want to go without knowing anything.
Smuggler: We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous. You will go from [Lebanon] to Sudan - the road is easy - but from Sudan to Libya, we have five days in the desert. You have to think of all the odds, the desert is more dangerous than the sea. The sea is also unstable, but we can go across it and count on God to help us.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is your name?
Smuggler: I am Abu Yehya.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What I want to know is that, if I decide to go to Sudan, how will you get me the visa? Is it an invitation, or a visa, how can I guarantee that the process will go as agreed?
Smuggler: You will get a regular visa, and you should not be concerned with how you receive it – you will have it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that some people are being fooled and they are getting visas that do not work. Is that true of is it lying? Can I be sure that it will work?
Smuggler: It is not true, the trip to Sudan is fully legitimate, and you can make sure yourself.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about the cost?
Smuggler: Concerning the cost, the visa alone will cost you $1,500 and you have to pay for the plane ticket. From Sudan to Libya it will cost you $1,800. The trip from Sudan to Italy will cost you $3,200.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that from Libya to Italy, it costs $2,200, why do you charge $3,200? Is it more expensive now?
Smuggler: We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, now I understand. Will I have to cross the desert from Sudan to Libya?
Smuggler: Yes, the only road we have is through the desert. You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there isn’t any other road.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about Turkey, do you know anyone there?
Smuggler: Yes, I do. Syrian-Palestinians are not allowed to travel to Turkey, but we can arrange something. However, the trip to Turkey will cost you 10,000 euros.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is the process?
Smuggler: We can travel by sea, on plane or by bus.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Is there a way to go to Turkey from Lebanon, through the sea?

Smuggler: No, not at all, everyone used to say that they can go from Lebanon, but it is not possible. And I am not even in Lebanon, I am in Sudan.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I can see that you have a Sudanese number.

Smuggler: Yes, that is right, and I heard about many people who got caught while being smuggled out of Lebanon. If you are determined to go, send me a copy of your passport and $1,000 and you will give me the rest of the money when you get there.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Since I do not know you and you do not know me, how can I guarantee that you will not take the money and disappear? I want some sort of a guarantee.
Smuggler: I might send people to meet you, but at the end this is your choice; this how it is done, you chose either to do it or not. Many others have done it and if someone is afraid, then it would be better he did not do it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I wanted to ask about the procedure, and I am intending to go, I just have to figure out how to get the money, because it is available.
Smuggler: You can contact me if you want and we will make an agreement.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Some people are getting caught in Turkey. They are reaching an area in the middle of the sea, and then they are being handed over to the Egyptian police. We heard about a few Syrian-Palestinians who are now imprisoned in Egypt.

You said that through the desert, whatever happens, you cannot be held responsible. But what about going by the sea? How can you be sure about what might happen? Smugglers themselves handed people over to the Egyptian police.
Smuggler: You have to consider the fact that you are going to be smuggled, and you are not traveling legally. You have to keep in mind all the troubles that can happen. You are not going legally, we are smuggling you. I am not trying to scare you, most of the people that we smuggled have made it there, unless if the person was unlucky – this is something else.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Just as you are telling me that some people reached safely, I heard of other who drowned, women and children died.
Smuggler: Are you interrogating me or what?

Ibrahim al-Khatib: No, I am not interrogating you; do not get me wrong, but I am paying money and I am traveling with my family. I want to guarantee my safety.
Smuggler: Let me tell you something; if you want to leave, count on God, and leave. But if you keep telling me that this happened to those people and you will keep thinking of that, you will never travel. If you will keep thinking in a negative way, stay in Lebanon.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: My whole point is that I am going with my family, if something happens to me, it will be fine, I will manage, but my wife and children would not be able to survive.
Smuggler: count on God, God will have mercy on them.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, I will contact you again when I get the money, and think more about it. I am sorry for taking too much of your time. Thank you
Smuggler: No problem, you are welcome.

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Aftermath of Airstrikes Against an Is...
Zuwarah, Libya
By hamzaturkia
15 Dec 2014

The aftermath of airstrikes in the Libyan town of Zuwarah.

Large food supplies were destroyed and infrastructure severely damaged when missiles landed on a warehouse for food storage and a chemical factory.

At least eight people were killed and 24 others wounded, including 10 African workers.

These airstrikes were carried out on December 2 by the forces of retired General Khalifa Haftar, who are trying to recapture areas in east Libya from Islamist rebels. Another wave of airstrikes, 10
days later, targeted areas in Zuwarah’s outskirts near the border with Tunisia.

Residents also expressed their anger that General Haftar’s attacks are harming civilians.

Rebel leaders accused Egypt of providing Haftar’s forces with warplanes used in the attacks.

The recent series of airstrikes also targeted a rebel-held international airport in in the outskirts of Tripoli. The spokesman of the rebel security force that controls the airport said that the bombings
were carried out during two consecutive days. According to the spokesman, the attacks targeted the airport’s runway, causing minor injuries and damaging civilian homes near the airport.

A bloody conflict has pitted two Libyan governments against each other since August. The country is torn between militias that were once united to oust dictator Muammar Qaddafi.

Despite recent United Nations mediation to broker a peace accord, fighting between the warring factions continues to weaken this fragile country. The prosperity to which Libyans have long aspired seem to many like a far-fetched hope.

Shot list:

2 M/S of a destroyed warehouse

C/S of food bags

M/S and C/S of a burnt truck

Various shots from the hospital

Various shots from Zuwarah Square

Various shots of streets of Tripoli

Various shots of destroyed houses near Mitiga International Airport

Various shots from inside the Mitiga International Airport

SOUNDBITE

(Arabic, man) Unnamed employee

(00:30) We were working normally at the offices when were caught by surprise by missiles falling on the warehouses, killing 8 persons and wounding 14 others. These warehouses provided food supplies from Sabrata to Ras Jdair (00:54).

(Arabic, man) Issa al-Mansuri, a resident of Zuwarah

(01:39) We condemn these bombings by Haftar’s air force. They are targeting civilians and innocent foreigners who have nothing to do with [this conflict]. These airstrikes are destroying infrastructure and will not solve the problem. We want a ceasefire by any possible means, we do not want airstrikes in addition to the fighting. We have enough weapons to hold war on different front lines and they are bringing in weapons and pilots from abroad. How will they solve the problem this way? (02:05).

(Arabic, man) Mubarak al-Nayli, resident of Tripoli

(02:48) Life in Tripoli is relatively stable but certain armed groups are breaching security by bombing indiscriminately (03:01).

(03:07) This has [scared] school children and caused a fuel shortage, and we faced a shortage in electricity, too, but it is fixed now (03:18).

(Arabic, man) Unnamed resident of Tripoli

(03:46) Instead of bombing military bases, [Haftar] is targeting the homes of civilians who have nothing to do with military action (04:04).

(Arabic, man) Al-Sader al-Turki, Spokesperson of rebel security unit at Mitiga Airport

(04:48) The airstrikes carried out by the so-called Haftar’s group did not affect our morale. These warplanes do not belong to the Libyan air force; they were brought from another country (05:13).

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General Haftar Enters Benghazi (Photo)
Benghazi, Libya
By Mohammad Salama
07 Nov 2014

November 6, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

Former Army General Haftar enters Benghazi, at the head of a military convoy, for the first time in almost a year. Forces loyal to Haftar managed to take back key areas of Benghazi, securing the city center. The troops now surround the city’s port, the militants last stronghold. General Haftar launched “The Dignity Operation”, a military offensive with the aim of retaking Benghazi from the hands of Islamist militias. Libya has been in a state of flux since Colonel Gaddafi was overthrown in 2011. The country is divided between two rival governments, with disparate tribes, militias and political factions fighting for power.

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General Haftar Enters Benghazi (Video)
Benghazi, Libya
By Mohammad Salama
06 Nov 2014

November 6, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

Former Army General Haftar enters Benghazi, at the head of a military convoy, for the first time in almost a year. Forces loyal to Haftar managed to take back key areas of the city, securing the center. The troops now surround the city’s port, the militants last stronghold.

General Haftar launched “The Dignity Operation”, a military offensive with the aim of retaking Benghazi from the hands of Islamist militias.

Libya has been in a state of flux since Colonel Gaddafi was overthrown in 2011. The country is divided between two rival governments, with disparate tribes, militias and political factions fighting for power.

Shot List:

1) L/S of the residents celebrating the arriving of the military vehicles
2) M/S of vehicle mounted anti aircraft guns
3) L/S of armed vehicles advancing the General’s parade
4) L/S of armed vehicles advancing the General’s parade
5) M/S of leader Mohammed Al Hijazi saluting the crowds
6) M/S of general Haftar in his car
7) M/S of the residents surrounding the General’s car and celebrating his visit
8) M/S of the residents next to his the General’s car welcoming him
9) M/S of General from the car’s window and the residents surrounding it
10) L/S of residents celebrating the arriving of the armed parade
11) M/S of the armed vehicles from the parade
12) M/S of the residents chanting around his car: the martyr’s blood won’t go away
13) L/S of the armed parade
14) M/S of a man from the special forces saluting the residents after entering Benghazi
15) L/S of residents waiting the parade
16) M/S showing the Logo of the Libyan Armed Forces on one of the vehicles
17) M/S of the parade and armed men guarding the vehicles
18) L/S of the parading passing in the streets of Benghazi
19) L/S of the residents after the passage of the parade
20) M/S of the residents celebrating the entering of the Libyan Armed Forces in the city

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Libyan Army Patrols al-Watiya Air Base
al-Watiya
By Mourad TEYEB
02 Nov 2014

Footage from December 2014 shows the Libyan Army patrols protecting Al-Watiya air base, west of Tripoli, from invading militias; and a take-off and landing of a Libyan warplane.

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Libyans Celebrate Feb 17 Revolution
Zuwara
By Mourad TEYEB
31 Oct 2014

Libyans celebrate the 5th anniversary of the February 17 Revolution in Zuwara, Libya.

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Benghazi Ghost Town
Benghazi
By Mohammad Salama
30 Oct 2014

October 30, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

In downtown Benghazi, normal daily life is gradually disappearing. For the past 15 days, streets have been empty and shops closed as fighting between Islamist militias and forces loyal to former General Khalifa Haftar escalates.
Haftar’s forces continue to advance on positions held by the Benghazi Revolutionaries Shura Council and have resorted to warplane attacks in their bid to control Libya’s second largest city. Mortar shell explosions can be heard in all parts of Benghazi. Violent clashes are still ongoing in Benghazi’s east and near the local university. The university’s administration building was also burned during the exchange of fire.
Government institutions have been closed and most of the roads were blocked. Most of this footage was taken at the rush hour in areas that would normally be crowded with cars and pedestrians, such as Jamal Abdul Nasser, Tipesti, and July 23rd streets. However, after the recent events, travel in these streets became almost impossible. Residents are likely to suffer an economic recession as activity in Benghazi continues to be paralyzed.

Shot list:

Various shots show the tree square in the city center with piles garbage on the ground.

Various shots show the piles of garbage on the road.

Various shots show Libya central bank closed along with a few shops.

Various shots show piles of garbage on the road.

Various shots show Jamal Abdul Nasser street.

Various shots show Jamal Abdul Nasser street.

Various shots show one of the closed markets.

Various shots show closed shops on al-Okaib street

Various shots show a blocked road.

Various shots show the Tree Square in the city center.

Various shots show an empty main road.

Various shots show a burnt car on the road.

Various shots shows Jamal Abdul Nasser Street blocked.

Various shots show empty blocked roads.

Various shots show Jamal Abdul Nasser street.

Various shots show the empty Tipesti intersection.

Various shots show the empty Tipesti intersection.

Various shots show the empty July 23rd Street.

Various shots the October 7th hospital on the July 23rd Street.

Various shots show Tipesti Street empty.

بنغازي تكاد أن تتحول إلى مدينة أشباح

بنغازي 30 أكتوبر وتحديداً في وسط المدينة ( داون تاون ) أصبحت مظاهر الحياة تنعدم شياً فشيأً الطرق فارغة وخالية من الناس المحال التجارية مقفلة لليوم الخامس عشر علي التوالي جميع المصالح الحكومية مقفلة أغلب الطرق مقفلة بينما لا تزال الإشتباكات متواصلة بيت الجيش وقوات مجلس الشورى في عدة مناطق متقرفة من بنغازي في الأطراف الشرقية والأطراف الغربية حيث يقوم الجيش بتضييق الخناق شيأً فشيأِ عي قوات مجلس الشورى من ما دعاها إلى التراجع إلى مناطق أخرى لا تزال خارجة عن نطاق الجيش

أغلب الصور التي ألتقطناها كانت في وقت الذروة وفي أكثر الأماكن إزدحاماً في الأيام العادية مثل شارع جمال عبد الناصر وطريق تبستي ومفترق طريق تبستي وطريق 23 يوليو أي من المفترض في هذه الأوقات أن تعج هذه الطرق والشوارع بالناس والسيارات لكن بعد التطورات الأخيرة أصبح التنقل حتى إلى أقرب الأحياء شيء مستحيل بالإضافه إلى إغلاق جميع المحال التجارية والمصارف من مايؤشر إلى حالة إفلاس عام تقترب من سكان هذه المدينة إذا أستمر الوضع علي ماهو عليه

طوال اليوم تدور الاشتباكات بين قوات الجيش وعناصر من مجلس الشورى ويسمع دوي أصوات الرصاص ومدافع الهاون في مختلف أنحاء مدينة بنغازي.

والجدير بالذكر أن الإشتباكات العنيفة مارال تدور رحاها في المناطق الغربية من بنغازي وفي محيط جامعة بنغازي تحديداً التي تضررت بشكل كبير وأدت الإشتباكات إلى إحتراق المبنى الرئيسي للإدارة بالجامعة .

لائحة اللقطات: (شرح غير تفصيلي لمجموعة اللقطات بالفيديو)

• مجموعة لقطات تظهر: W‪/‬S ميدان الشجرة وسط المدينة وتراكم القمامة به • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S تراكم القمامة الملقاة في الطريق • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S لمصرف ليبيا المركزي وبعض المحال التجارية مغلقة • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S قمامة متراكمة في شارع جمال عبد الناصر • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: L‪/‬S شارع جمال عبد الناصر • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: W‪/‬S شارع جمال عبد الناصر • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S أحد الشوارع التجارية ومحلاته المقفلة • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S شارع العقيب و محلاته مقفله • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S أحد الشوارع الرئيسية المقفلة • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: L‪/‬S ميدان الشجرة وسط المدينة • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S أحد الشوارع الرئيسية فارغ • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S سيارة محترقة علي الطريق جراء الإشتباكات • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: W‪/‬S شارع جمال عبد الناصر مقفل • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S أثار إقفال الطرق والشوارع • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: L‪/‬S شارع جمال عبد الناصر • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: W‪/‬S مفترق طريق تبستي فارغ • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S مفترق طريق تبستي فارغ • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: W‪/‬S طريق 23 يوليو ولا وجود مظاهر للحياة • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: M‪/‬S طريق 23 يوليو أمام مستشفى 7 أكتوبر • مجموعة لقطات تظهر: L‪/‬S طريق تبستي فارغ

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Forces of General Haftar Airstrike Ci...
Derna
By joba
23 Oct 2014

Forces loyal to the former Libyan army general Khalifa Haftar conducted airstrikes on the eastern Libyan city of Derna, which is controlled by extremist militias affiliated to ISIS, such as "The Islamic Youth Shura Council".
This video shows the extensive damage to an unfinished house, which the owner says was caused by one of the airstrikes.
Siraj Ebrik, the house owner, says that he never held any weapons in the building.

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Libyan Army Moves to Stop Rebels
Benghazi
By Ahmad Mogharbel
20 Oct 2014

October 20, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

The Libyan army launched an attack to stop rebel forces from capturing Benina International Airport in Benghazi, which has been under attack for months. Government ground troops, supported by air force, used mortar and heavy artillery fire, making a swift advance on positions held by Islamist rebels.

The government’s “Thunder 21” and “Artillery 204” battalions participated in the fighting that took place in the western Benghazi are of Al-Guarscia, which killed scores of government troops and rebels. Many civilians were either killed in the fighting or had to flee their homes.

The recent fighting is part of an offensive led by former General Khalifa Haftar to regain control over Benghazi, Libya’s second city.

Shot list:
1- A fighter fires a large-caliber sniper shot.
2- A fighter shoots a mortar shell.
3- Military vehicles with rocket launchers mounted on them move in a convoy.
4- Large rockets are fired from launchers mounted on a military vehicle.
5- Small rockets are fired from launchers mounted on a military vehicle.
6- A fighter on top of a military vehicle shoots rounds of heavy machine guns.
7- Empty ammunition boxes and bullet cases lie on the ground.
8- A destroyed building.

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Former General Launches Military Offe...
Benghazi
By Ahmad Mogharbel
19 Oct 2014

October 19, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

The Libyan Army continues its "al-Karama" military operations in Benghazi, led by former General Khalifa Haftar, to expel Islamic militants from the city. The video shows air strikes by planes, loyal to Haftar, bombing militant positions in Kanfouda and al-Qawarsha. Supported by the Libyan Army, General Haftar launched the offensive on Wednesday to drive the militants out of the Libyan capital Benghazi.

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The Last Refugees in Choucha, Tunisia...
Choucha
By Filippo Del Bubba
16 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Choucha Refugee Camp, Southern Tunisia

The UNHCR Choucha Refugee Camp opened in 2011, seven kilometres away from the Ras Ajdir border crossing, to help the thousands of people fleeing the conflict in Libya. Most of the those who fled in 2011, returned home, but some 4,000 could not go back for fear of persecution. These individuals were granted refugee status by the UNHCR. Tunisia did not – and still does not – consider applicants for refugee status. According to UNHCR, most of the refugees from Choucha have already been taken by the United States (1,717) and Norway (485). The EU has been fairly strict on resettlement; Germany took the most refugees at 201, Britain took three, Italy two and France one. However, some still remain as they have nowhere else to go.
The Choucha camp was officially closed in June 2013, but approximately one hundred refugees still remain there. They insisted on remaining in the camp after it was closed despite the fact that all UNHCR food, water, and medical services were cut-off on June 30. 260 of the camp’s inhabitants, categorized as “rejected asylum seekers,” now find themselves in a dire situation. Falling outside of the UNHCR’s mandate, they are not entitled to the integration services that the organization offers to refugees and asylum seekers. The last time that the rejected asylum seekers here received food distribution aid was in October 2012. One of them is Bright O Samson, who is fighting against eviction from the camp, and is demanding resettlement to a safe third country with effective system of asylum seeker protection. Ismail is from Sudan and he fled to Libya in 2003 due to the war in his country. There, he found peace and a job as a mechanic, but the 2011 uprising forced him to leave again and cross the border into Tunisia. With no official structure supporting them, Ismail and other refugees from Chad, Ghana, Sudan, Liberia, and many other African countries, say they feel like they've been totally abandoned.

Full 30 minute video available: http://www.transterramedia.com/media/49074

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Dawn of Libya Defending Town of Kekla
Kekla, Libya
By TTM albattat
01 Oct 2014

Kekla, Libya
October 1, 2014

Video shows fighters of the Islamist militia Fajr Libya (Dawn of Libya) and the al-Zentan tribes defending the town of Kekla, south-west of Tripoli against an attack by forces loyal to former Libyan army general Khalifa Hifter. The attack began October 14, 2014. Sources in the town say more than 140 people have been killed and more than 450 injured so far. Frequent shelling has limited the ability of local hospitals to treat the injured so many have to be transported over rough mountain roads to the city of Ghreyan. Most families have fled to other cities including Ghreyan, Misrata and Tripoli.

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Dawn of Libya Bring 'Security' Back t...
Tripoli
By TTM albattat
29 Sep 2014

September 29, 2014
Tripoli, Libya

A few months ago militants from the Dawn of Libya Brigade stormed Tripoli airport and began destroying the area, which resulted in great damage to the oil port. As their offensive spread to the areas surrounding the Libyan capital, many civilians were killed as the militants attempted to eliminate the remnants of the former regime. Once the group had a tight hold over the capital they began to impose their control, receiving support from other Libyan revolutionaries. They declared that the situation is now safer than it previously was. Their opposition, as well as the civilian population affected by the situation, maintained their silence to avoid any more losses.

Transcript:

Mohammed Saeed (00:22): "Dawn of Libya's operations are corrections of the revolution of February 17. As for the other rebels who joined the revolution after February 20, they are the real nationals and real revolutionaries, they of course support Libya Dawn that is considered the last pulse of the Revolution of February 17." (01:00)

Mohammad Imran (01:01): "I surely support Dawn of Libya. They were able to make a change that others couldn't." (01:10)

Mustafa Ahmed (01:52): "The first goal of Dawn of Libya is to eliminate corruption in all its shapes, and correct the path of the Revolution of February 17." (02:09)

Rabieh Riad (02:10): For me, the actions of Libya Dawn truly show a new dawn in the Libyan history. They brought back security in Tripoli after 4 years of instability." (02:39)

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Libyans Discuss Precarious Security S...
Tripoli
By Ahmad Mogharbel
19 Sep 2014

Tripoli, Libya
September 19, 2014

Despite the recent suffering faced by the people of Tripoli, life seems to go on. The army and police are constantly trying to keep things under control, especially in areas close to the airport and oil fields, which have seen an increase in militia presence.

Though some people believe that the situation is relatively stable, others describe life as total misery, with the proliferation of armed militias creating a sense of fear and insecurity among the city’s citizens.

SOUNDBITES

1-Ali Ahmad: "The situation in Libya is not very good. You have some areas where there is peace, others where the situation is very bad, and in other cities army men and police wander there all the time. But in general, the situation is not good" (00:40).

2-Abed Al-Baset Zalaytni: "The situation in Libya is not good, but since I live in Tripoli, where I live is somehow stable; police and army men are all around" (01:23).

3-Talal Saad: "The situation in Tripoli is perfect at the moment; stealing and killing was common in the past, now the situation is more stable" (01:58).

4-Naser Mohamad: "Tripoli is good, Alhamdulillah. Although some problems occurred next to the airport and the oil fields in the past months, now the situation is better. All the militias are out of Tripoli. As you can see I am next to the beach now, so all is good" (02:35).

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Unidentified Bodies Found After Deadl...
Benghazi
By Mohammad Salama
04 Aug 2014

August 4, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

Parents at the Benghazi Medical Center, BMC, try to identify the bodies of their relatives, after Benghazi residents volunteered to transfer the bodies of civilians, militants and special forces soldiers, out of al-Saeeka compound in the eastern town of Abu Atni.
The deadly clashes that erupted in al-Saeeka compound, between Islamic militants from Ansar al-Shariaa fighting with Libya Shield Forces against government special forces belonging to General Khalifa Haftar, ended today with the withdrawal of government forces.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
02 Aug 2014

Under one flag these protestors sing chants against the militias involved in the current conflict, primarily those from ZIntan who have controled Tripoli's airport since 2011, and those from Misurata who re-entered the city three weeks ago. The recent battles have destroyed Tripoli airport, set fire to fuel tanks containing millions of litres of petrol (at the main Tripoli storage depot) and destroyed residential areas. Hundreds of civilians have been killed and injured in the fighting. Many Tripoli residents question the motives of the warring sides and the claims by the Misurata militias that the purpose of their operation was to 'liberate' and 'protect' the captial.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
02 Aug 2014

As the protest rounds the square the demonstrators face the walls of Tripoli's iconic 'Suraya Al Hamra' (Red Castle) the external walls of Tripoli's old city. In the foreground a man holds up a banner saying 'No Brigades, we need one army under one flag'.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
02 Aug 2014

Tripolitanian protestors carried a large Libyan flag, a symbol of unity. Their faces all told of the pain and anger they feel as many are forced to watch helplessly while parts of the city are destroyed. Some of their chants mentioned Libya's second city Benghazi in the East, where fierce fighting between Islamist militias and forces led by a retired army genral is ongoing.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

United in their anger, Tripoli residents call for an end to the senseless violence and the presence of militias in the city.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

The protestors continue their chanting as they move around the square calling for an end to the militia occupation in Libya's capital city.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

Joining the protest with their father these young Libyan's hold a banner saying 'We want Libya, we are staying, and we will secure it'

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

As the protestors made their way around Martyrs Square they called out slogans against the militias, the most common 'la Misurata, la Zintan, Tarabules Tibi Alaman' (No Misurata, No Zintan Tripoli wants peace) refering to the main rivals in the current battle, militias from the city of Misurata and the mountain town of Zintan.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

Joining the protest carrying his two sons this father holds his family book (a registration document) which shows that he lives in Qasr Ben Ghashir a neighborhood close to Tripoli airport which has become a battleground as rival militias fight for control of the airport. Many civilians have been killed and injured and houses destroyed as militias continue indiscriminate shelling in residential areas. The boys sign simply asks, when can we go home?

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

The protestors marched taking many laps of the square. In the foreground in a show of solidarity with Libya's East the banner reads, 'Benghazi you are not alone, we are the bandage for your wounds'. Next to him another protestor carries a banner saying 'No for Shield, Yes for Police & Army'. A reference to the Libya Shield a coalition of revolutionary militia brigades (mostly from Misurata) who rather than being forced to disband were given official status under Libya's Ministry of Defence while maintaining their revolutionary command structures.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

Protesters gathered in Tripoli's Central Marytrs Square on Friday afternoon to demonstrate against the rival militias battling for control of Tripoli's airport. Petrol stations in Tripoli have been empty for weeks meaning many people had to walk or cycle long distances to join the demonstration.