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Thaipusam 19
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 20
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 01
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 03
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

This is a set of pictures showing Hindu devotee at the hardest part of pilgrimage, the 272 steps to reach the sacred Batu Caves temple to place their kavadi at the feet of the deity statue.

Hindu devotees climb the stairs to reach the temple cave during Thaipusam festival at Batu Caves in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfilled their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burden) to Lord Murugan. They will make an arduous climbing up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposited at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 04
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 06
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 07
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Thaipusam 08
Batu Caves, Malaysia
By Ahmad Yusni Mohammad Said
29 Jan 2015

Thousands of Hindus gather to participate in the annual Thaipusam festival of penance honouring Lord Murugan. During Thaipusam day, devotees will fulfill their vows by carrying 'kavadi' (burdens) to Lord Murugan. They make an arduous climb up the 272 steps leading up to the temple cave and deposit their 'kavadi' at the feet of the Lord Murugan to purify themselves.

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Rohingya - apartheid 02
Myanmar, Sittwe
By Pablo L. Orosa
23 Nov 2014

Rohima´s family is eagerly waiting to leave the Sittwe IDP camps on the difficult voyage toward Malaysia.

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Rohingya - apartheid 03
Myanmar, Sittwe
By Pablo L. Orosa
23 Nov 2014

After the 2012 riots, more than 125,000 Rohingya were forcibly relocated to IDP camps in the Sittwe area.

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Rohingya - apartheid 04
Myanmar, Sittwe
By Pablo L. Orosa
23 Nov 2014

Malnutrition has become an endemic problem in IDP camps where the Rohingya regularly suffer from food shortages.

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Rohingya - apartheid 01
Myanmar, Sittwe
By Pablo L. Orosa
23 Nov 2014

Around 10.000 people live in the Thay Chaung camp with neither the freedom of movement nor basic services.

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Rohingya aparheit 05
Myanmar, Sittwe
By Pablo L. Orosa
23 Nov 2014

Rohima, 30 years old, and hers two kids, Ammair Hussein(4 years) and Ammair Saddik (6 years) arrived in Thay Chaung on July 22th 2013 after their house was devastated by an Araken´s mob

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Rohingya - apartheid 06
Myanmar, Sittwe
By Pablo L. Orosa
23 Nov 2014

The Rohingya are not allowed to leave the camp at their own discretion. Since 2005, the government of Myanmar has enforced a strict two-child policy to control its demographic growth.

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Coral Triangle
Coral Triangle
By Mark_Esplin
10 Jun 2014

The Coral Triangle is one of the world’s most important natural resources. It is an area of ocean that covers 5.4 million km2, where more biodiversity can be found than anywhere else on Earth.

The 3,000+ species of fish, and vast coral reefs, provide livelihoods and food for an estimated 130 million people in the region. Millions more throughout the world also benefit from the bounty of natural resources, provided by the Coral Triangle.

But all is not well in paradise. Scientists, environmentalists, economists and governments, are increasingly worried for the future of this ecosystem. In the last forty years alone, the Coral Triangle has incurred substantial losses of 40% to its reefs and mangroves.

Projections suggest this rate of degradation is likely to continue, or increase into the future. With such significant numbers of people reliant on this natural resource, there is a potential catastrophe of global proportions waiting to happen.

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Nomads of the Sea 18
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children are going out into the ocean to look for seafood during the low tide in Mabul island, Malaysia. Whenever the weather permits, they take bowls and spoons and swim or crawl under the water looking around and looking for anything eatable to add to their family table.

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Nomads of the Sea 21
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children play in the water in Mabul island, Malaysia. Water is their home, playground and main source of food.

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Nomads of the Sea 20
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Studies on some children from Thailand and Burma, living in similar communities, show that they have unusually good underwater-vision because their eyes have adapted to the liquid environment.

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Nomads of the Sea 22
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children wait for their parents to come back from Semporna town, Malaysia. Since they are very little, Bajau kids are taught to sail, fish and do other activities necessary for their survival in the ocean.

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Nomads of the Sea 19
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Minjul and his friends look for seafood as they play underwater in Mabul Island, Malaysia. Studies on children in similar communities show that they have unusually good underwater-vision because their eyes have adapted to the liquid environment.

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Nomads of the Sea 25
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Woman is preparing food by her stilt house in Sibuan island, Malaysia.

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Nomads of the Sea 24
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau woman pours water away from her boat, near her small stilt house just right offshore Sibuan island, Malaysia.

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Nomads of the Sea 23
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

A lot of Bajau have moved from the boats and built themselves small houses on the coral reef or on the islands. There are about 100 Bajau living in Sibuan island. Might be that in the future all of Bajau are going to settle down and there won’t be any boats floating around Semporna town and other island in the region anymore.

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Nomads of the Sea 26
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
15 Feb 2014

Bajau children selling seafood and begging for money around the resorts in Mabul island.
A lot of Bajau children don’t go to school and just like their parents are not able to read nor write.

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Nomads of the Sea
Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

The Bajau Laut are one of the last nomads of the sea left. An ethnic group of Malay origin, these "sea gypsies" live on their boats for their entire lives, roaming in between the Coral Triangle (marine waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste). There might be anywhere from five to over 20 people living on one boat, spending all of their time together, moving from one place to another. The ocean is everything to the Bajau.

They live out their lives on the sea, and are so accustomed to the water that when they are on solid ground, some of Bajau say they start to feel 'island sickness' and hurry back to their home on the ocean. Though the number of these nomads is decreasing, as the fish that they depend on disappear from the seas with dynamite or cyanid fishing. Exploitive fishing was very popular up to a few years ago. Now cyanide and dynamite are prohibited in the area, though, as locals report, explosions still can be heard. Living in unity with the ocean allows the Bajau to develop extraordinary ability to free dive. They can go as deep as 20 meters down to look for seafood. They also used to dive for pearls. Studies on some children from Thailand and Burma, living in similar communities, show that they have unusually good underwater-vision because their eyes have adapted to the liquid environment.

Most of the Bajau doesn't have any documents, they doesn't know their age nor where they were born. Alee came to Mabul from Philippines and was working in one of the resorts on the island. He asked his boss to help him create a school for stateless children after he saw that so many kids in the island don’t have a possibility to learn. In the beginning Alee worked with only 4 children, but now over 80 students come to his classes.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Nomads of the Sea 05
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Sempula plays on the side of the boat while the rest of his family talk on the deck, their "living room," close to the shores of Semporna town. The family spends most of the time hanging out on the deck, looking through the windows, preparing food and playing games. The Bajau Laut, also known as sea gypsies, are an indigenous ethnic group who have retained a seaborne lifestyle, living in the boats, roaming in between the Coral Triangle or settling in small stilt houses built on the reef or islands.

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Nomads of the Sea 07
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Langring is resting at the end of the boat. The whole in the floor is used as bathroom. Family also has a few smaller boats, that they use for fishing and going to Semporna town or other islands.

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Nomads of the Sea 08
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Bajau living on boats in the Semporna area, Malaysia.
Currently, in the Malaysian state of Sabah, Bajau are stated to be the second largest ethnic group. However, exact figures of their population are unknown. More and more of them are moving to live on land voluntarily or forcibly.
!Most of the Bajau don’t have any documents, they don’t know their age nor where they were born. A new-married couple stays with their parents or gets a new boat for themselves and starts independent life. Then often relationship with family members don’t last, as the boats miss each other in the vast waters.

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Nomads of the Sea 06
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Sempula is playing on the boat. He is the youngest member of the family, always looking for some activities - climbing onto the roof of the boat, walking on the sides or running around.

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Nomads of the Sea 09
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Siboto is looking for louses in Langring's hair.

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Nomads of the Sea 11
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Langring is brushing his teeth on the board of the boat early in the morning.

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Nomads of the Sea 10
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Aranaki shaves on his boat close to Semporna town, Malaysia. Recently, his family has not moved their boat too much, preferring to stay close to the town, just floating a bit further from the fish market.

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Nomads of the Sea 12
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Siboto brushes her teeth in the "bathroom" at the back of the boat. There is also a family's kitchen where members of the family make food and eat together. During the day, Siboto helps other women with daily work or plays with Sempula and Langring.

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Nomads of the Sea 15
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Family on the deck is looking for some activities to spend the day. To get some money, they make carpets from water plants, sell them in Semporna town and buy clothes or food.

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Nomads of the Sea 16
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Shigesh is dressing up in the morning, while Sempula is urinating over the board. The rest of the family is still sleeping on the boat, floating close to the town of Semporna, Malaysia.

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Nomads of the Sea 13
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

The back of the boat is the family’s kitchen, where they make food and eat together. Their neighbours float around with smaller and bigger boats.
There might be 5 to over 20 people living on boat, moving from one place to another and spending all of their time together.

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Nomads of the Sea 14
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Lakit applies 'burak' - a powder made of waterweeds or rice and a yellow spice - to her face, to cool it down and protect it from the sun. Lakit is the one who takes care of looks in the family - she shaves everyone's eyebrows, makes their hair and takes care of their skin.

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Nomads of the Sea 17
Sabah, Malaysia
By Berta Tilmantaite
14 Feb 2014

Night on the boat in the waters of Semporna, close to the town. The whole family sleeps on the deck under the roof. They go to sleep when the darkness falls and gets up with the sunrise every day. If it starts raining during the night, women are pumping water from the bottom of the boat.