Thumb sm
Beirut Urban Faultlines (9)
beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
01 Oct 2017

Almost an antidote to the urban psychosis, a private-equity fuelled reach for the sky resulted in deregulated skyscrapers dotting the skyline. Whoever affords it, moves higher, only to be blocked in by the subsequent tower project.

Frame 0004
US-Backed Syrian Democratic Forces En...
Manbij, Aleppo Governorate, Syria
By yekru
09 Jun 2016

Video Shows Arab and Kurdish fighters holding positions on the western frontline overlooking ISIS-held Manbij, a border city northwest of Raqqa, the defacto capital of ISIS, moments after Coalition airstrikes hit the city.

Supported by U.S.-led air strikes and American Special Forces, the Syrian Democratic Forces have launched an offensive to retake ISIS-controlled Raqqa.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-9
Juba
By alexiawebster
12 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-6
Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-4
Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

Singer Okuta Ceasar Malis, known as 'Silver X' in his imported Japanese convertible outside his home in Juba, South Sudan.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-8
Juba
By alexiawebster
10 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-10
Juba
By alexiawebster
09 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb processing
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-7
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-3
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-5
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-11
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-1
Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-2
Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

Singer Annet Angaika 'Neetha Baby' on a boat traveling on the White Nile River during the 'Nile Cruise', a party held for young South Sudanese entertainers, artists and entrepreneurs.

Thumb sm
Sample media
Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-12
Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

Singer Okuta Ceasar Malis, known as 'Silver X' (arms raised) stands on a boat traveling on the White Nile River during the 'Nile Cruise', a party held for young South Sudanese entertainers, artists and entrepreneurs.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 01
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

White smoke resulting from clashes between the FSA and Kurdish fighters looms above the Sheikh Maksoud district of Aleppo.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 02
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

The Castello Highway, the main strategic supply route for the FSA. Kurdish fighters from the YPG backed by regime forces are trying to cut the FSA supply lines by controlling parts of the highway.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 04
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

Citizens of al-Halk district in northern Aleppo carry foodstuffs. The rebel held district is considered to be a hot zone as Kurdish fighters from the YPG backed by the regime are attempting to take control over the area.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 05
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

White smoke resulting from an airstrike rises above the Ashrafieh district of Aleppo.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 06
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

A merchant outside of the kiosk where he sells chicken in the market of al-Shaar distric, Aleppo.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 07
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

A merchant sits in the kiosk where he sells butane gas and charcoal, relied on for heat, in the market of al-Shaar district, Aleppo.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 08
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

Children sell biscuits in the road of al-Shaar market, Aleppo.

Thumb sm
Inside Rebel Held Aleppo 09
Aleppo, Syria
By rami.zien
17 Feb 2016

Children sell biscuits in the road of al-Shaar market, Aleppo.

Frame 0004
Sample media
Libyan Army Battles 'Libya Dawn' Guer...
Kikla
By Mourad TEYEB
14 Feb 2016

Our reporters were embedded with the Libyan Army during a battle against Libya Dawn (Fajr Libya) guerrillas in Kikla (South-west of Tripoli).

Thumb sm
Hairstylist for the Migrants in Calais
Calais
By Steven Wassenaar
10 Feb 2016

Sabrina Lefebvre is a hairdresser who works in the world of luxury and fashion, but in her spare time she visits migrant camps in France to offer them free hair cuts. We followed her in Calais and Dunkirk, and in Paris during a fashion show.

During fashion shows and shoots for luxury magazines, she works between Paris, London, New York or Milan, styling the hair of the supermodels for well known fashion houses. Now based in London, the young woman assists the stars of her profession, like the Japanese hair stylist Akki Shirakawa. She could have been content to continue her ascent in this world of luxury, glitter and glamor.

But last October the path of this hairdresser, who is a true nomad, crossed that of the thousands of migrants who settled in make shift camps in Dunkirk and Calais, some mere miles from the village where she grew up. "I have travelled in poor regions of Brazil, and I know that in the worst circumstances, the poor strive to preserve their appearance. It is a question of dignity, it helps preserve the morale. And I decided to help them with my means."

As soon as she gets the chance, Sabrina spends a few days to settle in the camps to cut the hair of migrants. Through her work the young woman has earned an astonishing popularity within a few months: numerous people come to greet her and are and queuing in front of her makeshift barbershops along muddy roads or in tents.

Nothing discourages them, nor the icy wind, nor the mud, nor the jokes in Kurdish, Arabic or Farsi, that comment the mimicry of customers, who try to make understandable by gestures their hair cut requirements. Even more amazing, Sabrina became met with migrant colleagues; she now calls to wield the clippers or scissors at her side.

Frame 0004
Triple Suicide Bombing Aftermath in T...
716, Tall Tamr,Syria
By yekru
11 Dec 2015

Footage shows the destruction left behind after three suicide bombings claimed by ISIS struck the Syrian town of Tel Tamer, in the country's northeastern Hasaka province on December 10, 2015. The bombings killed more than fifty people and wounded dozens more.

The attacks targeted key infrastructure and strategic checkpoints controlled by Kurdish forces in the area.

Thumb sm
Ukraine: The Wait
Kiev, Ukraine
By Benas Gerdziunas
06 Dec 2015

Completed over the course of three trips to Ukraine in 2014/15, this multimedia piece explores the heavy silence of war - away from the war porn of frontline fighting and Western-Russain power plays. With Ukraine slipping back into the corrupt era of Yanukovich, the anxious wait for reforms, true independence and peace continues.

Frame 0004
Ukraine: The Wait 19
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Benas Gerdziunas
17 Oct 2015

Shells land 20 kilometers away. Four months later, in January 2016, a separatist rocket attack a few blocks away kills 30 civilians.

Frame 0004
Ukraine: The Wait 01
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Benas Gerdziunas
17 Oct 2015

Separatists’ diversionary raid on a railway bridge leaves passenger trains stranded in Mariupol, Donetsk region. After many months of idleness, the bridge was finally repaired.

Frame 0004
Ukraine: The Wait 07
Popasne, Luhansk Oblast
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2015

[Radio chatter] Separatist positions report ‘111’ – ‘All clear’. Other call signs are ‘110’ – we’re being attacked; and ‘112’ – We’re attacking. It is believed, that the previously stationed Chechens and Don Cossacks have been replaced with regular Russian military combatants.

Frame 0004
Ukraine: The Wait 12
Kiev, Ukraine
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2015

Ukrainian street musicians perform a song by a
Russian rock band, ‘Splin’

I want to fall asleep and never wake up
go away into the sea and not come back
or come back, but together

With you so much more interesting
with you so many interesting things around
and not even tight (suffocating)

Without the squares, railway stations, stops
without all these civilisations

One more sip - and we’re on fire
on one, two, three

Burn with fire, your third Rome
catch my rhythm
and dance, dance, dance, dance

Frame 0004
Ukraine: The Wait 15
Mayorsk, Donetsk Oblast
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2015

The patrol passes along the village streets, dotted by drunk civilians and military personnel – a sign not so uncommon even before the war. Somewhere in the vicinity, a high ranking Ukrainian officer was assaulted and kidnapped with his armed escort a week before.

Thumb sm
Waiting for an Unknown Time: Asylum S...
Ranum
By Romina Vinci
05 Sep 2015

Ranum, north of Jutland in Denmark hosts an asylum center that is home to over 400 people waiting to find out if they will be given asylum. They can stay in this center for months, or even years, depending on the Danish immigrations services in based in Copenhagen. They are far away from their home countries and from their families, searching for the promised land that they always dreamed of, but for many of them, the present looks empty. These are a few of their stories.

Thumb sm
Asylum-Seekers in Denmark 01
Ranum, Denmark
By Romina Vinci
05 Sep 2015

Abdulnaser, 16, is talented with foreign languages. After four months in Ranum, he can speak a little Danish.
He from one of many Syrian families waiting in Ranum's Asylum Center to be recognized as refugees.

Thumb sm
Asylum-Seekers in Denmark 02
Ranum, Denmark
By Romina Vinci
05 Sep 2015

"€œA bomb destroyed our home in Damascus," said Mohammad, a 54 year-old Palestinian from Syria. "We sold the car and everything to find money to escape as soon as possible. There was no other way to survive." Mohammed remembers everything clearly. "€œIt was a long and dangerous journey crossing from Turkey to Greece and Italy by boat. We arrived in Denmark just with 20 dollars."

Thumb sm
Asylum-Seekers in Denmark 03
Ranum, Denmark
By Romina Vinci
05 Sep 2015

Najwa is arabic teacher, and in Syria she also worked for the United Nations. Her husband is an engineer, and one of his sons studied Engineering at the University of Damascus.
Her family waits at the Ranum Asylum Center in Denmark to be recognized as refugees.

Thumb sm
Asylum-Seekers in Denmark 04
Ranum, Denmark
By Romina Vinci
05 Sep 2015

The youngest of the family is Ahmed, 8 years old. He is a bright boy, and he likes to stay outside playing with the other kids. Sometimes, suddenly, he puts his hands up to his ears and start to tremble.

"He remember the sound of the bombs in Damascus," explains his mother, Najwa. "It'€™s impossible to forget. My hair has gone completely white."

Thumb sm
Asylum-Seekers in Denmark 07
Ranum, Denmark
By Romina Vinci
05 Sep 2015

In their kitchen where they live now in the Ranum Asylum center, hanging on the shelves there are many signs with a word: "€œPositive"€."

"People who lived here before us have left these papers, and we like to keep them, because it'€™s good luck€," said Mohammad, a 54 year-old Palestinian from Syria.

He and his wife Najwa have five children, but the oldest, Ezzat, 22, lives separated from his family now. He was caught in Bulgaria.

"€œNow he is in Germany," continues Mohammad'€™s wife, "and we are here waiting for the results of our interview. If it is positive, we can get to him, because of family reunification. Otherwise, we don'€™t know."

Thumb sm
Asylum-Seekers in Denmark 09
Ranum, Denmark
By Romina Vinci
05 Sep 2015

Hardi (left), a 30 year-old Kurd from Iraq, sits with another Kurd from Iraq, Hemem, (right) while he talks on the phone with his family. Ten years ago he escaped to Europe.

"€œI can't go back to my country," Hardi said. "They will kill me."

This is the only thing that he said about his past. At first he went to Sweden, then Finland, but his asylum requests were denied in both countries.

"€œIn 2008, my wife and my two children came to Denmark. We spent one year waiting, but the government decided to deport us to Iraq."

Hardi stayed in Baghdad not more than two weeks before then he was obliged to leave his family and to fee again.

"€œI went to Iran, then Turkey, and after a dangerous journey I arrived in England€."

Great Britain also rejected him, and he spent two years in England living on the street with no news of his family. Now he is back in Denmark. He has done three interviews and went to court to plead for asylum. The verdict was that he is not sure to stay in Denmark, but that he also can't go back to Iraq because his life is in danger.