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Ebola Diaries
Monrovia
By TTM Originals
06 Jul 2017

Never Lose Touch, Fight Ebola filmed by Daniel Van Moll, produced by TTM is a story of a painful fight against a deadly disease. It is also the story of a brand willing to report on the necessity to fight Ebola without losing touch, without losing the sense of belonging to a community. This is the story of PURELL Lebanon broadcasting images shot by a videojournalist in Liberia in order to emphasize on the necessity of hygiene. 

Our hands are the immediate contact we have with other people; our hands help us never lose touch with our community.

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Life after Ebola in Liberia: A Diffic...
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to everyday life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems. Survivors living on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia share their experiences of illness, loss, and coping with a new reality as the disease is slowly but surely eradicated from their area.

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

After one week of throwing up, Bindu, 23, went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

Helena Henry (30) and her brother were the first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Ebola Survivors 01
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

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Maternal issues through Ebola 05
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Health workers were afraid to accept Comfort at the local hospital when she needed to give birth. They thought she might be caught with Ebola, so they turned her away. Comfort is aiming at the spot right on the streets where she gave birth. To twins. In the rain.

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Ebola Survivors 08
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Rosanna's organization helps Ebola survivors to cope with the loss around Ebola.

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Ebola Survivors 09
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 10
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 11
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU) lies all but condemned on the outskirts of Monrovia.

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Ebola Survivors 12
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

All of this woman's family members died; only grand children remain. Now, her house is empty.

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Ebola Survivors 13
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola survivor does the dishes outside her home in Monrovia. Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 14
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 02
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

After one week of throwing up, Bindu (23) went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

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Ebola Survivors 04
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Helena Henry (30) and her brother the were first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

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Ebola Survivors 06
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 07
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 03
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
25 Feb 2015

The father of Vivian Kekula (26) was working in a local clinic as a nurse. That's where he contracted Ebola. When he got sick in June, her family didn't think about Ebola at first. The ambulance brought him to an ETU, but in the process he spreaded the disease to Vivian's mother, sister and a cousin. And then to Vivian. People were suffering from internal bleedings. "This was hard to watch. I was crying because I was scared. But people that were treating me where encouraging me, that gave me strength". When she got out she heard that all family members somehow survived the disease. "That's when we celebrated". Now she has a six month contract working for Save the Children to talk to survivors and hear their stories to see what aftercare is needed.

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Ebola Survivors 03
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
24 Feb 2015

Health workers were afraid to accept Comfort at the local hospital when she needed to give birth. They thought she might be caught with Ebola, so they turned her away. Comfort faces at the spot where she gave birth, in the middle of the the street, to twins. In the rain.

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Ebola Diaries
Monrovia
By Daniel Van Moll
26 Oct 2014

EBOLA DIARIES (Voice Over Edit) 11:37

This is the story of a painful fight against a deadly disease.

While Liberia has barely recovered from civil war, more than 2,700 people have died from Ebola in this West African country during the past seven months.

The estimated number of Ebola infections worldwide is nearing 10,000. While the recorded death toll is close to 5,000, the World Health Organization says the real number could be as high as 15,000. All of these cases originated in West African countries.

In Liberia, the worst hit country, the number of deaths continues to grow at a frightening rate.

The disease, first discovered in 1976, is believed to be transmitted to humans from wild animals.

According to the World Health Organization, Ebola’s fatality rate can be as high as 90 percent in some cases. Ebola attacks the blood, causing heavy internal bleeding, leading eventually to failure of the body’s internal organs.

The virus can be transmitted among humans through contact with a victim’s bodily fluids. To prevent infection, people are advised to avoid touching any part of the victim’s body or any items he or she might have used. They also need to avoid contact with a dead body.

The virus, however, cannot be transmitted through the air.

Poor sanitation infrastructure has contributed to the rapid spread of the disease in rural areas and shantytowns outside West African cities.

One of the precaution that has been taken to limit the outbreak is treating victims in isolation.

People suspected of being infected need to be monitored for 21 days.

In Liberia, soldiers were used to quarantine large areas where Ebola was detected. Schools were also closed to in an attempt to slow down the spread.

Treatment facilities have been set up in the locations where infections are discovered.
In the course of their work, local and international medical staff risk catching the virus from the people they are trying to save. Nearly 250 health workers have died from Ebola in various countries.

To protect themselves, they take painstaking measures everyday.

Medical workers put on plastic and rubber gear from head to toe before entering quarantined work areas.

The UN health agency hopes to start testing two new vaccines in West Africa in January on more than 20,000 health care workers. The UN agency also said that it might be able to provide a serum treatment in Liberia in November.

The World Health Organization officially declared Nigeria free of Ebola, which gives hope that the disease can be defeated in other countries.

The response to the disease requires enormous resources, according to the United Nations. Around 19,000 nurses and doctors, 1,000 vehicles and 500 burial teams are needed to cope with the epidemic in West Africa. But the UN says that only a small fraction of these have been provided so far.

The international community has been criticized for not acting quickly and efficiently enough in the face of this pandemic. The United States has started to build a hospital outside the Liberian capital Monrovia and another 17 treatment units to care for medical workers.

In Liberia, soldiers were used to quarantine large areas where Ebola was detected. Schools were also closed to in an attempt to slow down the spread.

The Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said in an open letter that Ebola has brought her country to a “standstill.” She warned the world, saying: “Across West Africa, a generation of young people risk being lost to an economic catastrophe.”

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The Last Refugees in Choucha, Tunisia...
Choucha
By Filippo Del Bubba
16 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Choucha Refugee Camp, Southern Tunisia

The UNHCR Choucha Refugee Camp opened in 2011, seven kilometres away from the Ras Ajdir border crossing, to help the thousands of people fleeing the conflict in Libya. Most of the those who fled in 2011, returned home, but some 4,000 could not go back for fear of persecution. These individuals were granted refugee status by the UNHCR. Tunisia did not – and still does not – consider applicants for refugee status. According to UNHCR, most of the refugees from Choucha have already been taken by the United States (1,717) and Norway (485). The EU has been fairly strict on resettlement; Germany took the most refugees at 201, Britain took three, Italy two and France one. However, some still remain as they have nowhere else to go.
The Choucha camp was officially closed in June 2013, but approximately one hundred refugees still remain there. They insisted on remaining in the camp after it was closed despite the fact that all UNHCR food, water, and medical services were cut-off on June 30. 260 of the camp’s inhabitants, categorized as “rejected asylum seekers,” now find themselves in a dire situation. Falling outside of the UNHCR’s mandate, they are not entitled to the integration services that the organization offers to refugees and asylum seekers. The last time that the rejected asylum seekers here received food distribution aid was in October 2012. One of them is Bright O Samson, who is fighting against eviction from the camp, and is demanding resettlement to a safe third country with effective system of asylum seeker protection. Ismail is from Sudan and he fled to Libya in 2003 due to the war in his country. There, he found peace and a job as a mechanic, but the 2011 uprising forced him to leave again and cross the border into Tunisia. With no official structure supporting them, Ismail and other refugees from Chad, Ghana, Sudan, Liberia, and many other African countries, say they feel like they've been totally abandoned.

Full 30 minute video available: http://www.transterramedia.com/media/49074

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Ebola Diaries 2014
Monrovia
By Daniel Van Moll
30 Sep 2014

At the end of September 2014 photojournalist Daniel van Moll travelled to Liberia to cover the outbreak of Ebola and the situation on the ground. The video gives insight to the enormous work of international health organizations like Doctors Without Borders who are operating the biggest Ebola Treatment Unit but also shows the struggle state health workers are experiencing while fighting the virus. Daniel visited the Ebola treatment unit of Doctors Without Borders in Monrovia where hundreds of volunteers provide help for Ebola infected patients. But he also visited rural counties in Liberia where international help did not yet arrive. But Daniel also focused on the social impact of the recent outbreak and visited a church in Monrovia to film the community trying to seek relief in their belief.

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Ebola Diaries (rough cut)
Monrovia, Liberia
By Daniel Van Moll
30 Sep 2014

At the end of September 2014 photojournalist Daniel van Moll travelled to Liberia to cover the outbreak of Ebola and the situation on the ground. The video gives insight to the enormous work of international health organizations like Doctors Without Borders who are operating the biggest Ebola Treatment Unit but also shows the struggle state health workers are experiencing while fighting the virus. Daniel visited the Ebola treatment unit of Doctors Without Borders in Monrovia where hundreds of volunteers provide help for Ebola infected patients. But he also visited rural counties in Liberia where international help did not yet arrive. But Daniel also focused on the social impact of the recent outbreak and visited a church in Monrovia to film the community trying to seek relief in their belief.

SHOTLISTS - Duration: 00’33’46’23
TIMECODE DESCRIPTION
00:00:00:00 Wall in Monrovia painted with warnings about the Ebola disease
00:00:10:15 Entrance to the compound of the Ebola Treatment Unit of Doctors Without Borders, Monrovia
00:00:48:19 A POV walk through the camp of Doctors Without Borders, Monrovia featuring hundreds of rubber boots drying after disinfection.
00:01:12:14 One of many hand-disinfection units
00:01:15:06 Disinfection of rubber boots
00:01:23:22 Removal of Personal Protective Equipment
00:01:54:11 The fenced high-risk area of the Ebola Treatment Unit with infected patients inside.
00:02:03:03 Nurses and medical personnel sitting next to the high-risk area.
00:02:12:22 A POV walk through the camp of Doctors Without Borders, Monrovia
00:02:31:20 Water deposit for medical personnel
00:02:40:09 Equipping Personal Protetive Equipment prior to entering the high-risk area of the Ebola Treatment Unit. The process takes about 10 minutes. You see names being written on the masks of the personnel at 00:08:43:11 to be able to identify individuals once they are dressed up.
00:10:51:12 Feaver measurement and hand disinfection at a county checkpoint outside of Monrovia
00:11:23:13 An abandoned clinic in Grand Cape Mount county. Personnel left after one case of Ebola had to be quarantined here (see below).
00:12:01:24 A young man being quarantined as he is suspected to have contracted the virus. This is his second of 21 days of isolation inside the abandoned clinic.
00:12:29:23 Emergency meeting of local health workers in Grand Cape Mount County.
00:13:06:05 Storage for protective equipment for local health workers in Grand Cape Mount County.
00:13:52:04 Driving to Dolo Town, a remote village in Margibi County.
00:13:59:15 Dolo Town in Margibi County. This town has been under lockdown for 21 days and lost about 250 people to Ebola.
00:14:31:06 Ebola Treatment Unit of the Island Clinic in Monrovia, next to Westpoint.
00:14:43:22 A WHO truck with health equipment leaving the Island Clinic in Monrovia.
00:15:12:14 Survivors of the Ebola infection are being released from Island Clinic Ebola Treatment Unit in Monrovia. They are declared cured and released after a last disinfection and hand-over of new uncontaminated clothing.
00:18:06:06 Sunday church service in St. Peter’s Church in Monrovia. Hundreds of people came to commemorate the fatalities of the recent Ebola outbreak.
00:22:26:14 And following: In times of Ebola sacramental bread is given out with tweezers during religious services to prevent the spread of the virus.
00:23:11:17 Hand disinfection liquids on a chair inside the church
00:23:18:12 One of the priests is disinfecting his hands during the service.
00:25:28:09 Soundbite about the need of international help / Dr. Julius Garbo, Grand Cape Mount County Health Officer
00:27:11:17 Soundbite about the need of international help and the process of retrieving a dead body that was suspected to be infected with Ebola / Henric Marcus Speare, Superintendent Mboo County
00:30:01:06 Soundbite about the personal tragedy from a local in Dolo Town, Margibi County / Francis, local journalist

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Ebola Diaries (Photos)
Monrovia
By Daniel Van Moll
29 Sep 2014

SCREENSHOTS FROM "EBOLA DIARIES," FILMED BY DANIEL VAN MOLL.

At the end of September 2014 photojournalist Daniel van Moll travelled to Liberia to cover the outbreak of Ebola and the situation on the ground. The video gives insight to the enormous work of international health organizations like Doctors Without Borders who are operating the biggest Ebola Treatment Unit but also shows the struggle state health workers are experiencing while fighting the virus. Daniel visited the Ebola treatment unit of Doctors Without Borders in Monrovia where hundreds of volunteers provide help for Ebola infected patients. But he also visited rural counties in Liberia where international help did not yet arrive. But Daniel also focused on the social impact of the recent outbreak and visited a church in Monrovia to film the community trying to seek relief in their belief.

Ebola: Life under quarantine
Monrovia, Liberia
By kierankesner
22 Sep 2014

The plane came to a rough landing as it skidded to a stop on the decaying runway. Upon exiting passengers were met with an army of people rushing to take our temperature with thermometers shaped like guns aimed at our heads. I would soon come to realize these thermometers as a frightening reminder that if the number read 101.5 Fahrenheit or higher, it might as well be a real gun they were placing to my head. Washing my hands with chlorine, I proceeded through the cacophony of customs where my passport was quickly stamped and I was sent on my way. Over the next week I would come face to face with Ebola; photographing the sick, dead and every stage of the virus in between. Realizing the severity of this epidemic that sets a country back after steadily making gains from the destruction caused by civil war from 1989-2003.

In the West Point neighborhood of Monrovia and nearby towns and villages, everyday life has nearly come to a halt as aid workers try to get ahead of the disease, setting up testing and washing stations, and as authorities try to enforce quarantines set up to prevent the disease from spreading to other parts of Monrovia.

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Ebola: The Burial Team
Unification Town
By kierankesner
22 Sep 2014

In Unification Town, Liberia young men take on the grim job of burying the dead lost to the Ebola virus currently devastating West Africa. Careful preparation is made before entering the homes of the deceased, and the team must disinfect thoroughly after removing the body. Family members watching the burial from a distance are instructed not to visit the grave for at least a year. Without proper burial, the bodies of Ebola victims could perpetuate the spread of the virus that has already claimed over 2,500 lives.

Burial teams in Sierra Leone have recently come under attack as locals become suspicious of aid workers trying to prevent the further spread of the virus that has been slowly ravaging larger and larger areas of West Africa since the first case was discovered in December 2013. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, by September 2014 the number of confirmed cases exceeded those in all previous outbreaks of the disease.

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Liberia, NEC Destroys 2011 Elections
Monrovia, Liberia
By Anthony Daniels
21 Aug 2012

The National Elections Commission (NEC) will today August 21, 2012, commence the destruction of Ballot papers for the 2011 National Referendum and the 2011 presidential and Legislative Elections at all NEC's magisterial offices across Liberia.

The destruction of the ballot papers and other election related material is in keeping with Chapter 4 Section 4.16 of the 1986 New Election Law of Liberia.

The Acting Chairman of the NEC, Cllr. Elizabeth J. Nelson, will head a team of members of the Board of Commissioners and a team of NEC Staff to NEC Magisterial Office in Brewerville where an occasion marking the symbolic destruction of the electronics materials will be held.

Similarly, destruction of elections materials will be held simultaneously across the country at all NEC magisterial offices.

Meanwhile, the Commission is inviting all registered political parties, government officials, civil society organizations, international and local partners, the media and the public to attend the occasion which begin at 10:a.m., August 21, 2012.

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Liberia Refugees in Ghana refusing to...
Accara, Ghana
By isaachgmedia
14 Jul 2012

INTRO: Some Liberian refugees leaving in Buduburam refugee camp in Ghana refusing to return home for fear for their life.

SCRIPT:
However, according the Ghana Refugee Board, Liberian refugees in Ghana who refuse to subject themselves to a voluntary repatriation or be re-integrated in the local community will lose their status as refugees.

Out of the 11, 000 Liberians refugees at the beginning of this year , 3800 of them opted for voluntary repatriation, and 4,000 them indicated their willingness to be re-integrated to the Ghanaian community. According to officials of the Ghana Refugee Board, others have applied for exemption from the cessation clause and they will have to justified why they still want to remain refugees .

An ultimatum was given to the refugees by the UNHCR and the Ghana Refugee Board in February this year, to decide whether or not to voluntarily return to their country of origin or legalise their stay in Ghana before March 30, 2012.

The action was informed by the decision of the international community to invoke the cessation clauses built into the 1951 UN Refugee Convention for Liberian, Angolan, Rwandan, and Burundian refugees in Africa.

The cessation clauses allow refugee status to end once fundamental and durable changes have taken place in the country of origin and the circumstances that led to refugee flight no longer exist.

The international community deems it fit for the refugees to return to their countries, since the conditions that pertained in those countries at the time they left had changed.
Buduburam camp, Gomoa located in the Central Region of Ghana, was established in 1990 to accommodate the influx of Liberian refugees who fled to Ghana when Charles Taylor came to power after a civil war. Initially, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) provided the settlement’s residents with individual aid and relief.
In 1997, however, Liberia held elections that the UN judged to be fair enough to allow for safe repatriation conditions. As a result, the UNHCR discontinued refugee assistance to Liberians in Ghana, and the settlement lost much of its funding.
The Buduburam settlement served as the center of most of the Liberians community.
Ghana is currently host to about 14 000 refugees from the sub-region, namely from Ivory Coast, Togo, Central Africa Republic, Mali, Ethiopia, Somalia, Rwanda and Burundi, majority of them being Ivorians.

1.WIDE VIEW OF BUDUBURAM (LIBERIA REFUGEES) CAMP, GOMOA , CENTRAL REGION OF GHANA.
2.POSTER READING, “After 30 June,2012, you will no longer be a refugee!Choose to return home or stay. The choice is yours”.
3.VARIOUS OF PEOPLE LOADING VEHICLES WITH HOUSEHOLDS GADGETS.
4.SOUNDBITE, ELDER JOSEPH TORH(UNEMPLOYED) SAYING,
There is problem in Liberia, that’s why some of us are waiting to see what is happening, yes others don’t know, successful elections, go home!, go home! go home!, go home!, go home!, Why?
4.PEOPLE WALKING IN THE STREET.
5.LIBERIAN REFUGEE BEING INTERVIEWED.
6.VARIOUS OF REFUGEES SEATED WAITING TO BE INTERVIEWED.
7.GAVIVINNA TAMAKLOE(CAMP MANAGER, BUDUBURAM CAMP, CENTRAL REGION OF GHANA) CONVERSING WITH A REFUGEE.
8. BUILDING READING, “Settlement manager’s office, Buduburam refugee settlement, Gomoa”.
9.SOUNDBITE, GAVIVINNA TAMAKLOE SAYING,
“Currently there are a group of about 500 households who has requested from the UNHCR to continue being refugees, they want an exempted to the cessation as far as their status is concern. So since the UNHCR cannot handle that by itself, it had refer the matter to the Ghana Government through the Ghana refugee Board, so what we are doing right now on the camp is interview each of these households”. 10.HANNAH MAMIE KOLEWOE(LIBERIAN REFUGEE) BEING INTERVIEWED BY AN OFFICIAL. 10.HANNAH MAMIE KOLEWOE IN TEARS AND TALKING.
11. HANNAH MAMIE KOLEWOE BEING INTERVIEWED BY AN OFFICIAL.
12.SOUNDBITE, HANNAH MAMIE KOLEWOE SAYING,
“Moving to Liberia is not safe for me, it is not safe for me and neither my children and neither the brothers that were helping me, its not safe, Liberia is not safe for me, it may be safe for others but its not safe for me, because as we are sitting here today talking, secret killing is still going on”. 13. CLOTHING ON DISPLAY FOR SALE. 14. HANNAH MAMIE KOLEWOE WALKING WITH HIS CHILDREN.
15.VARIOUS OF PEOPLE IN THE STREET.
16.VARIOUS OF YEINYEA ZANGA(LIBERIAN REFUGEE) DRYING CLOTHING.
17. YEINYEA ZANGA SAYING,
“Now they say I’m a new person in the database, I’m not active, because I’m not active UNHCR doesn’t care for me, so I’m here on my own until God will find ways for them to help those of us who don’t have ID cards, we are still here because going back to Liberia is not easy”. 18.REFUGEE CHILDREN INFRONT OF THEIR HOUSE. 19. VARIOUS SHARON COOPER, (UNHCR COUNTRY REPRESENTATIVE) LOOKING THROUGH A PAPER WITH A STAFF.
20.SOUNDBITE, SHARON COOPER SAYING,
Generally speaking, people may have been absent, some may have been returned to Liberia and not been around but have subsequently come back , now if we don’t see you for three, four years, what’s the logical thing to do(pause), to inactivate your name if you cannot explain your absence

21.VARIOUS OF PEOPLE IN THE STREET.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, two spanish doctor, are taking care of a baby girl after having perform on her a intestine surgery.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a woman waiting interferon therapy, as victim of the HIV-Aids.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a child is recuperating his health conditions, looked after by his father, after an umbilical hernia surgery.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a spanish doctor, is taking care of a child, seriously affected by the Dracunculus Medinensis, also known as Guinea worm disease,that is caused by the large female nematode, Dracunculus Medinensis, which is among the longest nematodes infecting humans. The adult female is primarily larger than the adult male. Mature female worms migrate along subcutaneous tissues to reach the skin below the knee, forming a painful ulcerating blister. They can also emerge from other parts of the body, such as the head, torso, upper extremities, buttocks, and genitalia. A person gets infected, by drinking water from stagnant sources (e.g., ponds) contaminated with copepods containing immature forms of the parasite (juveniles), which have been previously released from the skin of a definitive host. The infection can also be acquired by eating a fish paratenic host, but this is rare. The parasite is known to be found mostly in some West-African countries .

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a spanish doctor, is taking care of a child, seriously affected by the Dracunculus Medinensis, also known as Guinea worm disease,that is caused by the large female nematode, Dracunculus Medinensis, which is among the longest nematodes infecting humans. The adult female is primarily larger than the adult male. Mature female worms migrate along subcutaneous tissues to reach the skin below the knee, forming a painful ulcerating blister. They can also emerge from other parts of the body, such as the head, torso, upper extremities, buttocks, and genitalia. A person gets infected, by drinking water from stagnant sources (e.g., ponds) contaminated with copepods containing immature forms of the parasite (juveniles), which have been previously released from the skin of a definitive host. The infection can also be acquired by eating a fish paratenic host, but this is rare. The parasite is known to be found mostly in some West-African countries .

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a young mother, taking care of her child during the malaria treatment.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a baby boy under malaria treatment.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a personnel of the St'John's of God Hospital of Monrovia, is cleaning the pediatric ward.

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LIBERIA AFTER THE WAR - Beirut Editor...
Liberia Monrovia
By Beirut Editor's Picks
26 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a woman waiting interferon therapy, as victim of the HIV-Aids.