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Airstrike Casualties in Sanaa Hospital
Sanaa
By Dhaifallah Homran
26 Mar 2015

Sanaa, Yemen
March 26, 2015

Video shot at a hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, shows several people killed and injured in airstrikes. The victims who appear in the video also include children.

A coalition led by Saudi Arabia launched air attacks against Houthi-held locations around midnight on March 26. Media reports quoted sources at the Yemeni Ministry of Health saying that at least 18 people have been killed so far in the airstrikes.

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Houthis Capture Key Military Airbase ...
Lahij
By Dhaifallah Homran
25 Mar 2015

March 25, 2015
Lahij, Yemen

Houthi militants, allegedly backed by troops loyal to former President Ali Abdullah Saleh, captured a key military airbase in the province of Lahij. According to a New York Times report, this base was used by American in "counterterrorism" operations. The airbase was use The Houthis are now just 40km away from the city of Aden where President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi fled after being evacuated from the presidential palace in Sanaa.

The video shows Houthi militants roving the streets of Lahij in military convoys and grounded fighter jets at the Al-Anad military base.

SHOTLIST

Wide of military vehicles moving
Wide of helicopter flying at low altitude
Wide of armored vehicles column
Wide of fighters in moving pickup truck
Traveling of fighters at entrance of military base
Traveling of helicopter flying at low altitude
Traveling of road and cement blocks
Wide of fighter jets on the ground
Wide of fighters and military vehicles
Wide of fighters on top of armored personnel carrier
Traveling of fighters inside pickup truck

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Houthis Fire Upon Protestors in Taiz
Taiz
By Muatasm Mansor Al-Hitari
22 Mar 2015

March 23, 2015
Taiz, Yemen

In this video, Sunni protestors demonstrate against the Houthi takeover of Taiz in front of the "Special Security Forces" building where Houthis rebels stationed their reinforcements.

The protestors burn tires while militants loyal to the Houthis respond with live ammunition in central Taiz.

According to eyewitnesses, Houthi rebels have transported militiamen from Sana'a to Taiz to reinforce local security forces already under their control.

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ISIS Claims Responsibility for Suicid...
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
20 Mar 2015

March 20,2015
Sanaa, Yemen

According to Houthi spokesman, more than 135 Yemenis were killed and many more injured in a series of three suicide bomb attacks targeting two Shiite mosques during Friday prayers in the capital city of Sana’a.
In this video, shot at the al-Hushaish Mosque, witnesses said the first bomb exploded in the first row, right in front of the podium, while the second blast detonated outside of the mosque as worshipers fled.
Minutes after the attack ISIS claimed responsibility on Twitter.

(01:46-01:55)

This is the result of the accident. The biggest crime against humanity and God.

(01:56-02:06)

The infiltrators of America and Israel. We will not accept this, and we will not surrender because of the explosions they are doing in the house of God.

(02:36-03:03)

What happened is that after the Friday prayer, Dr. Taha Motawakel, the mosque Imam (preacher), gave his speech and we suddenly heard an explosion in the mosque. All you can see around you is injuries and corpses, it was filled with them, anywhere you look or step, it is all injuries and deaths.

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Families Mourn Victims of ISIS Attack...
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
20 Mar 2015

March 20, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

In extremely rare and graphic imagery, this video shows family members of the slain gather at the morgue to identify and grieve the murder of their loved ones.

More than 135 people were killed in triple suicide bombings that rocked two Shiite mosques during Friday afternoon prayers in Yemen's capital of Sana'a. ISIS subsequently claimed responsibility for the attacks.

01:49

NAT Sound, crowd screaming in morgue: “Death to America. Death to Israel. May the Jews be Damned. Victory to Islam. God is greatest.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Unnamed Woman

02:08 – 02:20

“Only an idiot would not be moved in such situation. Such cruelty! How could they be called human when they kill innocent people on a Friday? May God help us!”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Unnamed man

00:21 – 00:30

“We have only become stronger and more resilient. We shall continue to follow this path. We shall continue to stand against evil. We shall be stronger and stronger.”

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Houthis Remove Barriers Safeguarding ...
sanaa
By Dhaifallah Homran
04 Mar 2015

All US personnel having vacated the US Embassy in Sana'a, Yemen on 21 January, the Houthi chief of security in the capital deemed the immediate streets around the US Embassy safe enough to remove the road-barriers that previously surrounded it. They had been in place for the past decade. Having done so, the Houthi militia gather in front of the embassy to chant their signature call to arms, "Death to America; Death to Israel; Curses to the Jews and Victory to Islam."

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Young Houthi Boys in Yemen Trained as...
Amran,Yemen
By Dhaifallah Homran
01 Mar 2015

March 1, 2015
Amran, Yemen

Houthi children are being trained as fighters in a former Yemeni Army base.
Boys aged from 12 and up to teenagers are being taught by Houthi fighters how to handle and shoot rifles and fighting tactics.

Video shot at the former base of Yemeni Army, Mechanized Unit 310, in the Houth region in Amran province, in north east Yemen.

The base was captured by the Houthis in the summer of 2014, and during the battle the Yemeni Army commander of the base, general Hamid al-Qosheibi, was killed.

After their training the child soldiers are being assigned to man checkpoints and provide security at demonstrations.

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Regular Flights between Iran and Yeme...
Sanaa International Airport
By Yousef Mawry
01 Mar 2015

March 1, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

For the first time in 25 years, an Iranian flight landed in Yemen at Sanaa International Airport after Houthi and Iranian officials signed a contract in Tehran to open a direct aviation service between the two countries. They agreed to set up 14 weekly flights between the two countries. The plane was from Mahan Air, a private airline based in Tehran that operates domestically in Iran and internationally to the Far East, the Middle Eat, Central Asia, and Europe. Keen to show that they were not supplying the Houthis with weapons, the Iranian flight arrived with a donation of 12 tons of medical supplies and equipment from the Iranian Red Crescent. Iranian officials at the airport said they regret that such an agreement was not signed years ago to help build Iranian-Yemeni relations.

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Sanaa Street Where Frenchwoman Was Ab...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
25 Feb 2015

Footage shows the French embassy in Sanaa after its closure due to the security meltdown which that has gripped the nation.
Footage also shows the 45th street in Sanaa where Frenchwomen Isabelle Prime was abducted on the morning of February 24.
Footage includes interviews with two Yemenis who were working on the same road where the the French women and her translator.
A store owner on the 45th street says the French women was abducted only moments after he opened his store early in the morning.

Interviews:
Mershid Merhibi (construction worker)

"We were working in this location and we then heard some of the workers who were over here having breakfast talking about a French women who was abducted in this street. This actions is not acceptable and is prohibited in Islam, because all foreigners in Islam have full rights and freedoms. This is what our prophet taught us."

Majid al-Khyadh (Store owner on 45th street)

“As we were opening in the morning we heard that a French women had been abducted in this area and we also heard many people talking about this issue. We tell those who kidnapped this French women that these actions are against our principles and against the values of the Yemeni people. These actions are indeed acts of terrorism. We do not know who is responsible for the abduction; however, our message to the abductors is stop insulting and tarnishing the image of the Yemeni people. “We call on the government, and all security officials and institutions to bring an end to these abductions and violations.”

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Bomb Explodes in Neighborhood of Hout...
Sanaa
By Dhaifallah Homran
23 Feb 2015

February 23, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

A bomb went off near a military academy on Monday evening in a neighborhood of Sanaa where many Houhi leaders reside.

The blast did not cause any casualties or injuries and is currently being investigated by the Yemeni authorities.

No group has claimed responsibility yet but al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) has taken responsibility for previous attacks against Houthis who they regard as apostates.

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Presidential Palace in Yemen Abandone...
sanaa
By Dhaifallah Homran
21 Feb 2015

February 21, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

Video shows Houthi takeover of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi's residential compound after he disguised himself to escape Sanaa and fly to his hometown of Aden in the south. Hadi had been under weeks of house arrest by the Shiite Houthi militia, who allegedly looted his property soon after his departure. The UN denies having assisted him in returning to Aden, a port city south of Sanaa and the country's fourth largest.

Video shows the presidential palace's abandoned gates and Houthi convoys patrolling the perimeter.

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"

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Houthis Rally Against Yemen Political...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
02 Feb 2015

Thousands of Shi'ite Muslim Houthis staged a rally in the capital Sana'a on February 2nd to show solidarity with the Houthi movement's decision to grant Yemen's political factions a three day ultimatum to pull the nation out of its political vacuum.

The protesters said political factions have only two days left to reach an agreement, otherwise the Houthi leadership would take matters into his own hands and form a presidential committee to govern Yemen for an interim period.

Soundbites
(Arabic) Munthir al Asbahi, Revolutionary Youth Leader
“We the revolutionaries and the free people of Yemen declare our support and solidarity for all of the decisions made by the expanded national conference which occurred yesterday”

(Arabic) Amer Muhsun Khalil, Demonstrator “We came out today in solidarity with the resolutions of the expanded national conference and to answer the call of the leader of the Quranic demonstration, Sayyid Abd al-Malek al-Houthi, may God protect him. We came out today to also show support for the decisions he made and to give him full authority to lead the nation out of the current situation which we are living in”

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Houthis in Yemen burn US , Israeli an...
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
23 Jan 2015

January 23, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

Tens of thousands of Yemeni Houthi supporters rallied in the streets of Sanaa to show their disapproval of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons and their solidarity with the Houthi movement. Army officials tried to maintain order at the demonstration where protestors burned US, French, and Israeli flags, shouting "Down with the US! Down with Israel!"

The protesters also expressed their view that Yemen is better off without President Hadi and that the people of Yemen will take control of their own political affairs without the President. They also called for the establishment of a presidential committee to take control of Yemen’s political affairs and to pave the way for early presidential elections after President Hadi formally submitted his resignation.

Shot List:

1 M/S of men stepping on the French, Us, and Israeli flags

2 M/S of men burning the flags

Shouting: Allah Akbar, death to USA, death to Israel, death to Israeli people, victory for Islam, Allah Akbar, death to USA, death to Israel, death to Israeli people, victory for Islam

3 Various of men marching

Transcription:

Mohamed al-Darb, Army Colonel (Arabic, Man)

(01:35) "We are here today, the security forces, the army all the Yemeni people to show support to the Prophet, after the insults the French, American and Danish newspapers said. We marched to denounce the international and regional conspiracy on Yemen to divide it into cantons. The main reason behind this is a civil war, but the Yemeni armed forces and the Yemeni people marched for the unity of Yemen." (02:05)

Abd al-Kareem Abd al-Razaq, Citizen (Arabic, Man)

(02:06) "We march to say to all the conspirators such as the Security Council and the Ten Countries to tell them that they will not affect us. Who is this Abd Rabbu Hadi or anyone like to him to affect these great people these people will choose their leadership these great Yemeni people is standing still like a camel." (02:08)

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Houthi Militia Takes Over Presidentia...
Sanaa, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
19 Jan 2015

January 20, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

The Presidential palace in Sana'a has fallen under the Houthis control after brief clashes erupted between Houthi fighters with government forces.

This attack follows some of the worst fighting in the capital Sanaa in years when forces loyal to the President clashed with the Shiite Houthi Rebels on Monday, January 19.

On the same day the Houthi rebels surrounded the presidential palace and could be seen patrolling the streets of Sanaa in armed convoys before a shaky ceasefire agreement was reached.

The latest clashes broke a ceasefire agreement that was announced Monday and temporarily ended hostilities.

Footage shows the latest Images of the of the Presidential Palace compound and surrounding areas which were damaged due to the fighting and heavy explosions..
Footage also shows Houthi fighters near the presidential palace during the sporadic clashes.

The footage also includes an interview with one of the Houthi fighters who says:
“We only returned fire at the targets above us and nothing else. They (government forces) were firing at us from above and they were also firing at civilian houses. They used tanks and they were firing out of control”

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Clashes Between Houthis And President...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
19 Jan 2015

January 19, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

A ceasefire agreement between Houthi rebels and Yemeni government forces has been reached, after heavy clashes erupted in Sanaa on Monday morning. Shiite Houthi gunmen surrounded the presidential palace and their armed convoys patrolled the capital.

Information Minister Nadia Sakkaf said the convoy of Prime Minister Khalid Bahah was attacked after he left a meeting with high-level Houthi representatives. Sakkaf added "This story is developing so quickly... We may have a new Yemen by the end of the day, maybe a new system altogether."

The Houthi militias took control over Sanaa in September 2014, and have since advanced into other provinces.

Shot list:

1-Footage of sixty street and military base near president Hadi’s house.

2-Close up of Ansarullah tank

3-Footage of the Al-Asbihi district near site of clashes

4- Smoke and explosion in al-Asbihi district near al-Nahdah military base.

5- Smoke at the bottom of Al-Nahdah military base near presidential palace

6- Smoke at al-Nahdah military base near presidential palace

7- al-Nahdah Military base near presidential palace.

8- Smoke from al-Nahdah Military base near Presidential palace.

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Yemenis Condemn Terrorism and the Moc...
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
15 Jan 2015

January 15, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

Yemenis say the attack on the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris is not representative of the views of the Yemeni people. They also condemn the satirical cartoons depicting Islam’s holy prophet and called on the French government to prevent the cartoons' publication.

This comes directly after Al-Qaeda’s branch in Yemen (AQAP) claimed responsibly for the shootings in Paris that killed 12 Charlie Hebdo magazine employees. Yemenis fear that the Paris attacks will have a large impact on the global war on terror strategy in Yemen.

Transcription:

Faris Ahmed Shamsan, University student, (man, Arabic):
“The fact that al-Qaeda claimed this attack in Paris is a result of the practices of the foreign press agencies. We want to say that Islam is the religion of peace, mercy, cooperation, and respect, and will never condone such crimes. What happened could be a result of what Yemen is suffering from.”

Waheed al-Muqtari, Citizen, (man, Arabic):
“The way France dealt with the problem was very negative. We all know that two Algerian people have died in the accident and were not mentioned in the French news as if they were not among the victims. Also the French government continued to support the newspaper that insulted Prophet Mohammad, peace be upon him. We are not justifying the actions that were taken against the newspaper, but the support that France is providing for the newspaper means that they are standing against Islam and that is something we cannot accept.”

Amin al-Kibsi, Journalist, (man, Arabic):
“The fact that "Ansar al-Sharia" has claimed this terrorist attack and there has been an accusation against the Arabic Peninsula or al-Qaeda of the Arabic Peninsula, or Yemen, is just a process of disinformation to execute American-Zionist plans.”

Hathem al-Hasabai, University student, (man, Arabic):
“The support that was provided by the French government for the newspaper will create more extremism than before. It was a hasty decision to support the newspaper that way. The French government should have worked on calming the international atmosphere and not on supporting the newspaper in that way. It will only increase extremism.”

Dr. Ismael Mansouri, Doctor, (man, Arabic):
“We have an ancient history, we condemn terrorism, but at the same time we refuse [to accept] our Prophet being insulted.”

Abdullah Abdalrahman, Teacher, (man, Arabic):
“Concerning the fact that "Ansar al-Sharia" have claimed this terrorist attack in France, it is a known thing that those terrorist groups do not represent Yemeni people. Al-Qaeda is only a tool in the hands of the west, they use it to justify actions they do later on, that was clear when France did investigations in Yemen, and this is what justifies its actions in Yemen.”

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Handmade Yemeni Daggers, 10,000 Dolla...
Sanaa
By TTM Mena Desk
06 Jan 2015

In Yemen it is rare to see a man in public without a traditional dagger, known as a ‘Jambiya’, on his waist. Although they barely have any practical use, the ceremonial daggers have been an integral part of the male Yemeni identity for centuries. While outsiders perceive the dagger as a type of weapon, Hussein al-Azizi insists that it is solely for decoration and a symbol of power and honor.

  • Hussein Hussein al-Azizi, Merchant, (man, Arabic): “I carry a Dagger, because it is an accessory for myself, and a pride for all the Yemenis. It is not a weapon as many consider it to be, it is an accessory for men to wear, it was used as a weapon in the old times when people traveled from one village to another as protection since they did not have guns.”

Some Yemeni men spend fortunes on their jambiya. It is not unheard of for a man to spend over 10,000 dollars on this accessory as Hussein did.

  • Hussein Hussein al-Azizi, Merchant, (man, Arabic): “What makes my dagger special is that it is made from the horn of a rhinoceros. I believe it is really special and better than other jambiyas and it is worth $10,000. There are even more luxurious ones but I believe in the old proverb, which says, "My beast is better than the King's horse."

This workshop owned by Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi in the old city in Sanaa, has been producing traditional jambiyas for generations. Today it has adapted and specializes in handles made of bull’s horns, since the more desirable materials of ivory and rhinoceros’ horn have been banned.

  • Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, Dagger Workshop Owner, (man, Arabic): “There has been a ban on hunting rhinos since 1982, enforced by The United Nations, especially for Yemenis. So we had to rely on Kerk daggers made of bull’s horns, so we can keep selling and not lose our profession and preserve this Yemeni accessory.”

The jambiya consist of the belt, used to keep the dagger on the waist, the blade forged from steel, and most importantly the handle, which determines the quality and price of the jambiya.

The most superior and expensive knives, known as “Seifani”, have handles carved from rhinoceros’ horn. The second best, “Aaji”, have handles made of ivory. Due to hunting regulations, both these types of daggers are now rare. The next level down is made of bull’s horn and called “Kerk”. The lowest have handles made of wood, fiberglass

  • Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, Dagger Workshop Owner, (man, Arabic): “The best dagger currently at al-Azizi dagger shop is al-Sefani, which dates back 400-600 years. It is made from rhinoceros’ horn. There is a difference between the daggers made from the horn of a rhinoceros and the Kerk dagger made from the horn of bulls, and the Chinese dagger, made out of wood and fiberglass, which overran and ruined the market.”

It is considered shameful if a man pulls out his jambiya in a confrontation, instead it is used in joyous celebrations. The jambiya decorated the waist of the groom at Yemeni weddings and is an essential part of al-Baraa traditional dance.

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Banned from Making a Living for Secur...
Sanaa
By TTM Mena Desk
27 Dec 2014

40 year old Mershid al-Merhibi makes a living by transporting people on his motorbike through the Yemeni capital, Sanaa.
For 7 years the taxi motorbike has been the only source of income for Mershid, his wife and 5 children.
Despite his BA degree in business he has not been able to find a job and has no choice but to work as a taxi biker because of the high rate of unemployment and the government’s failure to resuscitate the economy.

Like all other taxi bike drivers in Sanaa, Mershid makes up to five US dollars a-day, which is barely enough to make ends meet. However, this income is now in danger.
At the beginning of December, 2014, the Yemeni government passed a law banning motorbikes in the capital to try to prevent frequent assassinations and acid attacks carried out by unknown gunmen on motorbikes.

The government claims that motorbikes makes it easy for criminals to conduct attacks and then quickly escape.

The taxi bikers say banning motorbikes is not the answer because it is their only source of income, and so Mershid and many others continue to work on their motorbikes at high risk of being caught by the police, who Mershid says will probably destroy his bike.

Interviews:

Mershid al-Merhibi, Motorbike Driver (man, Arabic):
01:41
"I am Mershid al-Merhibi. I’m 40 years old and graduated from Sana’a University. I was forced to work with the motorcycle because there are no jobs and I am unemployed. You can see for yourself how the situation is here.”

02:18
“I wake up each morning and get on my bike and make my way to this intersection to wait for passengers to come. Sometimes, I carry one passenger and sometimes two. They come and we negotiate the price and then I take them to their destination.”

02:44
“Sometimes I find 3-4 passengers a-day. God does not disappoint, and I am thankful for that.”

03:24
“During the past two years, a lot of problems happened with motorcycles. A lot of assassinations occurred here in Sana’a as well as in other provinces . Because motorbikes are easy to get away with, these wicked people use them as a tool to carry out assassinations and acid attacks. They ride and throw acid then easily escape on their bike. This act has ruined work for motorbike drivers including me.”

03:58
“I am just looking for work but I could not find anything except working on my motorbike. They need to find us a solution”

Hussain al-Shadadi, Traffic Officer (man, Arabic):
04:05
“There are people who really need the motorbike to make money. They don’t have any other source of income except with their motorbike. However, because there are criminals who are causing problems and assassinating people, politicians, security and army personal with it, making a living on a motorbike has been banned”.

Mershid al-Merhibi, Motorbike Driver (man, Arabic):
05:18
“Sometimes the government sends police patrols to confiscate motorbikes, they take it from you by force. If you can get away from them and manage to transport one or two passengers a-day, this is good for you. However, I have seen them take a motorbike and cut it in half before my eyes.”

05:54
“The money I make in this job is often saved. Some of it is spent on rent, the kids and their school and to buy basic necessities for living. Even though the money is not enough, it still helps out. If they take away our motorbikes, then may god help us; where will we go and what we will do”.

06:25
“We ask Allah for a better, stronger nation that will not prohibit motorbikes so people can make a living”

Shot List:

Various shots of Mershid on his motorbike
Various shots of bikers
Surveillance camera video showing an acid attack on a man in the street
Various shots of Mershid and passenger on the bike

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Roadside Bombs Target Houthis in Yemen
Yemen, Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
08 Dec 2014

Sanaa, Yemen
December 8, 2014

Five bombs exploded in Sanaa early on Monday morning as children prepared for school. The bombs targeted Houthi checkpoints and houses but so far no deaths have been recorded but according to local media several people were injured. The Houthi movement, which has links to Shiite Iran, has become the main political force in Yemen since it captured the nation’s capital in September.

Transcription:

Interviewee 1, (Man, Arabic):
(00:20-00:39) "There were lots of people at the entrance of the door, the explosion happened after 15 minutes. Three house were damaged and the houses near them, and the people walking on the road were injured. This is what they do, this is what they are good at."

Interviewee 2, (Man, Arabic):
(00:50-01:16) "At 6am two explosions occurred. The first one was the biggest and caused all this damage. The second explosion was because of a car bomb. It caused less damage but several injuries, 4 people are now in a difficult situation."

Interviewee 3, (Man, Arabic):
(01:44-01:53) "This glass is 8mm thick, all of these windows and walls are destroyed."

Interviewee 4, (Man, Arabic):
"This is the result of the first explosion. This window along with this huge wall have been destroyed."

Interviewee 5, (Child, Arabic):
"We heard the first explosion which was very strong and the second explosion too."

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Iranian Ambassador to Yemen Escapes H...
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
03 Dec 2014

December 3, 2014
Sanaa, Yemen

An explosive-laden vehicle targeted the home of Iranian ambassador to Yemen in the capital Sanaa.

Officials at the site say this was a one of a kind explosion which rocked the entire capital. However, the car bomb failed to harm its intended target, the Iranian Ambassador, who was not in the compound at the time of the attack.

The Yemeni government is expected to form a committee to investigate the assassination attempt however it is mostly likely that the attack was carried out by Al-Qaida in Yemen.

Footage shows houses wrecked due to the heavy impact of the explosion and shattered windows in nearby residential houses and vehicles within the vicinity.

Shot list:

00:00
A close-up shot on the Iranian flag/ zoom out shows damaged Iranian embassy compound from outside.

00:18
Several wide shots show people in plain clothes and military outfits standing outside the Iranian embassy compound.

00:35
A close-up shot on the Iranian flag/ zoom out shows damaged Iranian embassy compound from outside.

00:48
A wide shot shows a car with broken windshield.

00:53
A wide shot shows people walking past the Iranian embassy compound.

01:03
A wide shot shows three men inspecting the damage caused by the explosion.

01:11
Two wide shots show broken windows in the Iranian embassy compound.

01:20
A tilt down movement/ a wide shot shows broken windows in a supermarket near the Iranian embassy compound.

01:34
Interview with private security guard outside supermarket near the embassy (Man, Arabic)

“The explosion took place at 9:05 [AM] at the opening time. I thought it was inside [this building] but it was 300 meters away. It was in the direction of the north. This shrapnel landed here. The glass and decoration in this shopping center were also broken.”

02:03
Interview with government official (Man, Arabic)

“All the concerned authorities and the local council will carry out their duties. His Excellency the President of the Republic has given his orders to authorities to be present at the explosion site
people who were affected by the incident will be paid indemnities.”

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Handmade Yemeni Daggers, 10,000 Dolla...
Sanaa
By TTM Mena Desk
01 Dec 2014

It is rare to see a Yemeni man in public without a traditional dagger on his waist. While many would think of a dagger as simply a weapon, Yemenis consider it a necessary tool in a man’s daily life.

Some Yemenis are even willing to spend a large amount of money for a dagger. Tens of
thousands of dollars, and more. Sheikh Naji Ben Abdil Aziz al-Shayef, the head of the Yemeni Sheikhs, is said to have paid one million dollars to buy a dagger once owned by Emam Ahmad Hamid Eddine, the ruler of Yemen from 1948 to 1962.

The al-Azizi Family has been handcrafting and selling daggers for over a hundred years. The craft has been handed down through generations. The family owns the most famous dagger workshop and store in Old Sanaa.

Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, the family patriarch, says the dagger is an essential accessory, a
Yemeni tradition just like the ‘Oqal’, the white head dress worn by men in the Gulf. His son Hussein Hussein al-Azizi believes the dagger is a symbol of power and honor for Yemeni men.

Yemeni daggers consist of three parts. The first is the handle, which determines the price of the dagger based on the material used. The second part is the blade, and the third is the belt used to carry the dagger on the waist.

The fanciest and most expensive daggers are the ‘Seifani’, with handles made of the horn of a rhinoceros. These have become rare since the hunting and trade of rhinoceros parts was banned by international agreement.

The second level, ‘Ivory’, are daggers with handles made from the tusks of elephants. The third level, ‘Kerk’, have handles made of the horns of bulls. The lowest level, mainly manufactured in China, have handles of wood, fiberglass or plastic.

Interviews:

Hussein Hussein al-Azizi, Merchant:

(00:41-01:29) I carry the Dagger, because it is an accessory for myself, and a pride for all the Yemenis. It is not a weapon as many consider, it is an accessory for men, and they used it in the old times as a weapon when they used to travel from a city to another or from a village to another, and because Yemen is a wild area full of mountains, and because many wild animals are spread across the area, in that case it is used as a weapons for protection, for the lack of guns and mechanic weapons.

(01:37-02:20) What makes my dagger special is, apart from the fact that a man always prefers his own possessions, that it is made from the horn of a rhinoceros. I believe it is really special and better than other jambiyas and it is worth $10,000. There are even more luxurious ones but I believe in the old proverb which says, "My beast is better than the King's horse."

(02:26-03:09) The yemeni dagger has many usages, such as in weddings, it is used as an accessory specially by the groom, and it is essential in “al-Baraa” dance (traditional Yemeni dance). What differs the daggers is the shape and the way it is made. What determine its price is the shape and the type of horn it is made of.

Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, Dagger Workshop Owner:

(04:27-06:47) It is made from the horn of the rhinoceros, dates back to the time of Bin Zi Yazan .

Dagger initially became popular because they are the main aspect of the Yemeni accessory. Daggers differ from city to another and from a village to another. For example; in Saade province, dagger have a specific shape, different from the one in Maareb, Taaz al-Mohabsha, Al-hadarmi, and Sanaa, which has a very special collection.

The best dagger currently is al-Azizi dagger, and al-Sefani, which dates back to 400-600 years. It is made from the horn Rhinoceros. There is a difference between the daggers made from the horn of the Rhinoceros and the Kerk dagger made from the horn of bulls, and the Chinese dagger, which ruined the market.
There has been a ban on hunting rhinos since 1982 enforced by The United Nations, especially for Yemenis, so we had to rely on Kerk daggers made of bull’s horns, so we can keep selling and not lose our profession and preserve this Yemeni accessory. Each country has it’s own accessory type, in Oman for example they used daggers, in the Gulf they use “Oqal” (the white head dress), every country has its own traditions.

I want to correct some misunderstood information about daggers; they say that Yemenis use daggers used as weapons. I want to correct this piece of information to say that; they used them as weapons back in the time when they used to travel from a city to another, and go through long roads, and face wild animals, that is the only case when they used daggers as weapons. Other than that case, they are only used as an accessory, even 2-4 year old children carry daggers that are made for them, different from al-Sefani daggers.

(07:04-07:32) As for the blade, the sharp metal part, we get it from Hadramout, We have different types, Jubi, Adani (from Adan), Taazi (from Taaz), Senaani (from Sanaa). I currently have all types.

Shot List:

Various shots of daggers in al-Azizi shop
Various shots show the production of the daggers in al-Aziz workshop
Various shots of grooms with daggers on their waists
Various shots of grooms dancing “al-Baraa” traditional Yemeni dance in a mass wedding

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First Ever Public Ashura Ceremony in ...
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Sanaa, Yemen

Thousands of Houthis gathered at an indoor stadium in Sanaa to mark Ashura and the martyrdom of Imam Hussain Ibn Ali Ibn Abi Taleb who was killed on the tenth day of Muharram 14 centuries ago. This is the first time that the Ashura ceremony has been performed in public in Yemen.

As part of the Ashura event Abdel-Malek al-Houthi, the Houthi leader, also gave a live speech via satellite. He expressed to his supporters that Yemen is currently facing a similar scenario to the one faced by Hussain Ibn Ali, against tyranny and oppression.

He called on the Yemeni people and Yemen’s political factions to reject foreign intervention in Yemen’s internal affairs, which he blames for fueling political and sectarian unrest in Yemen.

Transcription:

Saleh, Shia Houthi supporter (man, Arabic):
(02:05-02:22) "This day is related to a historical, religious, great figure, Imam al-Huseein, who is considered a symbol of Islam. This occasion represents a revolution against iniquity and oppression, a revolution against everything related to injustice."

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Friday Celebration of Houthi Revolution
Sana'a
By Yousef
25 Sep 2014

September 26, 2014
Yemen, Sana'a

Tens of thousands of Houthis held a mass rally on Friday, on the airport road of Sana’a, to declare the victory of their revolution’s and to bury a number of their revolutionaries who were killed in clashes with armed forces during the week. The protesters said the demonstrations and sit-ins in Sana’a will continue until a new Prime Minister is elected and a new Yemeni government is formed, as stipulated in the UN-brokered agreement signed by the Houthis and the Yemeni government, four days ago.

Transcription:

(02:14) Protester:" I am sure that this revolutionary crowd is responsible for us achieving our demands, and responsible for giving the Yemeni people a better life, and changing the situation in Yemen."

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Child Labor in Yemen
Sana'a, Yemen
By dustweare
24 Sep 2014

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi has been a labourer in the capital Sanaa since the age of seven. But his is, unfortunately, not an extraordinary case. He's one of more than a million child labourers in Yemen, and the numbers are increasing as the country is plunging deeper into its political and financial crisis.

Shotlist:

Saleh pushes his wheelbarrow towards work in the old city of Sanaa
Close up of Saleh's face while he speaks in off
Interview of Saleh in the living room of his family's house
Saleh lifting cage full of groceries in the market
Saleh's employer talking while Saleh loads the car
Video portrait of a kid at work in Old Sanaa
Sanaa cityscape. Women veiled walking, cars passing by, barbed wire, mountains in background
Soldiers controlling cars in a check point in Sanaa city
Saleh walking the street towards his house
Close up of Saleh's dad while he speaks in off
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
Saleh entering the house
Saleh's father praying in the living room
Saleh's walking up the stairs of the house
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
pot pouring steam in the kitchen
Saleh's brothers and father eat in the living room

Script:

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi walking through the streets of Sana'a.

SALEH Abdallah al-Raymi (Arabic): “Here you find real heritage, and it's pretty. Tourists come here to visit.”

VO: “Through the narrow, historical streets of the old city in Sana'a. [Two-second pause] Through architecture you only find here in Yemen. A unique place. But also the workplace of many children.”

SALEH (Arabic): “My name is Saleh Abdallah Hassan Ahmad al-Maswari, and I'm 16 years old.”

Saleh BEING INTERVIEWED

SALEH (Arabic): “I get up in the morning, and then I go to school. I stay there till 12 o'clock, before going back home. At home I eat lunch, and then I go to work.”

Saleh WHILE HE'S WORKING

SALEH (Arabic): “I work with a wheel-barrow at the market place. I transport vegetables and fruit. Anything really.”

VO: “Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi started working when he was seven years old. But his story is not unique. [Pause for two seconds]. In Yemen there are 1,3 million child labourers. Children as young as 5 are seen working in the Yemeni capitol. And the work is tough.”

VO: “The country has seen years of political and economical unrest, and can't seem to turn the tide. As a result, many families are forced to send their children to work. For most of them, it's not a choice.”

Saleh WALKING TOWARDS THE HOUSE

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “I'm the father of Mohammed, the oldest, and then Saleh, Mokhtar, Aziz, Fikri, Osama, Amira, Uthnan. All in all we're twelve people in the family.”

VO: “Abdallah Hassan al-Raymi WANTS the best for his children. But kidney failure has made him unable to work. And with no functioning welfare state in Yemen, three of his sons are now the family providers. [Pause, two seconds] Their father has bigger dreams for them.”

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “For example for Saleh to go study, and then get work in company or at a factory. That's better. What they do now is hard. It's really hard work to be at the market with the wheel-barrows. But if they could work somewhere with a steady paycheck, that would be a lot better. Then they would be able to cover all the expenses we have.”

VO: “Their biggest worry right now is their landlord threatening them with eviction. They are not able to pay the full rent every month.”

STAND-UP: It’s here through historical streets inaccessible by car where childern like Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi are needed. The problem of child labor in Yemen has become severe, maybe too severe to be solved in the near future.

NOOR al-Kasadi, Child Protection Specialist, UNICEF (English): “It affect them negatively actually. It deprive the children ...”

VO: “He's working every day, but says he has been lucky. He hasn't been exposed to any kind of severe harassment. But, it's a hard life. A life he doesn't want for his younger siblings.”

SALEH (Arabic): “A man can do this job easily. But a boy isn't able to do it as well. [PAUSE] I see myself as a boy -- still.”

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Yemeni Houthis Intensify Anti-Governm...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
29 Aug 2014

Sanaa, Yemen
August 29, 2014

Tens of thousands of Yemeni followers of the Shia'a Houthi group, massed in the country's capital Sana'a in a protest calling for the government to reverse a decision on cutting fuel subsidies and resign. The rally is part of an ongoing demonstration that has been going on for over a week and is growing in size. The Houthis are a powerful force in Yemen and have been fighting for years for more representation for their Shia'a sect in the northern part of the majority Sunni nation.

SOUNDBITE : Yemeni Protester (Man, Arabic, 25 sec) 'We are protesting against the government's decision to lift subsidies on oil derivatives, and making it harder to the people to buy petroleum products. We will remain protesting peacefully until our demands are fulfilled, and they will be achieved with God's will (Inchallah)'

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Yemen's Houthis Reignite Calls For Do...
By Yousef Mawry
27 Aug 2014

Sanaa, Yemen
August 27, 2014

Hundreds of thousands of Yemenis once again took to the street of Sana’a to call on the Yemeni government to meet their demands or else they will be forced to upscale anti-government revolutionary activities inside Sana’a in the coming days.

The mass rally comes after the Houthi leader called on his supporter and the Yemeni people to continue the second phase of their peaceful revolution until the government bows to their demands.

Abdullah Abd al-Rahman (protester) These people are coming out in the millions to call for the downfall of this corrupt government and the implementation of the outcomes of the national dialogue conference and to reconsider the lifting of fuel subsidies. The first phase to reach these goals is to assemble peaceful sit-ins on the outskirts of the capital Sana’a. The second phase is to stage massive demonstrations in the streets of Sana’a. The Houth’s leader said yesterday we shall advance into the third phase of the revolution, if the corrupt government does not meet the demands of the Yemeni people.

Umm Isah (Protester) “We came out the women of Sana’a to support our men in this revolution. This is the true revolution against the deadly price hikes and the government. What will the future hold for us and our children? Everyone is in misery because of this inflation, even the fetus in his mother’s stomach is effected by this. I tell president Hadi that he must step now down; we will achieve our demands no matter what they do.

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Yemenis Block-off Main Roads and Burn...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
30 Jul 2014

July 30, 2014
Sana'a, Yemen

Hundreds of Yemenis blocked off main roads and burned tires, in a number of Yemeni provinces, in protest against the latest price-hike of petroleum products, which came into effect on the third day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

On Wednesday morning the prices of fuel had increased from 2,500 to 4,000 Yemeni riyals ($11.6 to $18.6) for 20 liters. The price of diesel also increased from 2000 to 3,900 riyals.
Yemen is considered to be the poorest country in the Middle East with nearly half of its population living in severe poverty.

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Mass Garbage-Man Wedding in Yemen
By Muatasm Mansor Al-Hitari
16 Jul 2014

June 21, 2014
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni government subsidized a mass wedding for 350 couples, the men of which were all garbage collectors. They were provided with traditional dress, music and the marriage ceremony. Samir Shamal, 25, was one of the grooms who was married. Despite being recently betrothed he still lives at home and is unable to move out with his wife because the wages for garbage collection are too low.

Transcription:
Samir Shamal, 25, Male. Arabic:
"My name is Samir Shamal Abdullah and I work as a garbage-man. The salary is 27,000 (Yemeni rial) but it is not enough to cover our basic needs along with the rent and water bills, and all of that, but thank God. Life is hard, and the salary is only 27,000. I am about to have my own a family, and I do not know if I should live with my siblings or elsewhere. The rent elsewhere is at least 30,000. We were all living together, and we are all men, but now a woman is going to live with me, so I do not know if I can still live here, as it is embarrassing for me and my siblings. The salary is not enough for me to rent outside but I will find a person who is willing to lease a small place and I will take it."

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Child labour in Yemen (VO - Norwegian)
Sanaa
By dustweare
14 Sep 2013

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi has been a labourer in the capital Sanaa since the age of seven. But his is, unfortunately, not an extraordinary case. He's one of more than a million child labourers in Yemen, and the numbers are increasing as the country is plunging deeper into its political and financial crisis.

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After the Spring in Yemen (18 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
29 Jul 2013

The Grand Saleh mosque, Sana'a. Inaugurated in November 2008, it can hold up to 40,000 worshippers and cost nearly 60 million US dollars to build despite Yemen being the Arab world's poorest nation.

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After the Spring in Yemen (19 of 28)
Hammam, Yemen
By dustweare
11 Jul 2013

Kid walks through the khat fields of his family holding the Quran in the sacred month of Ramadan.

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After the Spring in Yemen (17 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
05 Mar 2013

The entrance of a museum that Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen's deposed president, opened to honor himself. The gallery is located inside the Grand Saleh mosque, in Sana'a. The centerpiece of the museum are the charred clothes he was wearing when a bomb exploded in the Grand Saleh mosque aiming to end his life in 2011. Also complementing the garments, there is a display of pieces of shrapnel found in his body afterwards.

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UN Security Council visits Sana'a, Ye...
Sana'a, Yemen
By luke_somers
29 Jan 2013

United Nations Security Council members hold a meeting with key figures directly involved with Yemen's political transition at the presidential palace in Sana'a, Yemen.

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UN Security Council visits Sana'a, Ye...
Sana'a, Yemen
By luke_somers
28 Jan 2013

Gulf Cooperation Council Secretary General Abdul-Latif Al-Zayani speaks with United States Ambassador to Yemen Gerald Feierstein about Yemen's upcoming National Dialogue at the presidential palace in Sana'a.

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UN Security Council visits Sana'a, Ye...
Sana'a, Yemen
By luke_somers
28 Jan 2013

National Dialogue Technical Committee head Abdul-Kareem Al-Iryani and Gulf Cooperation Council Secretary General Abdul-Latif Al-Zayani at a meeting with UN Security Council members at the presidential palace in Sana'a, Yemen.

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UN Security Council visits Sana'a, Ye...
Sana'a, Yemen
By luke_somers
28 Jan 2013

2011 Nobel Peace Prize winner Tawakul Karman was among the participants in a meeting with United Nations Security Council members at the presidential palace in Sana'a, Yemen.