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Northern Nigeria's Displaced Fear Ret...
Yola, Niger
By jfaden
25 Mar 2015

The Nigerian Army with the collaboration of foreign mercenaries are recording victories and declaring more and more towns captured from the hands of Boko Haram, however the question still remains if it is really safe for the residents of those towns to go back.

The about 1.5 million displaced people scattered in different locations in and outside Nigeria believe it is too early for them to go back as they have lost everything. To return and start a new life before the rainy season in June would prove a serious challenge.

As the presidential election draws closer, the question of voters' safety on polling day remains unanswered as some parts of Borno State have seen fresh attacks and suicide bombings of recent.

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Blind Man Founds School for Visually ...
Yaounde, Cameroon
By Dzekashu Macviban
19 Feb 2015

Life for visually impaired people in Cameroon is a constant battle, given that they are discriminated upon, a phenomenon which condemns some of them to live in solitude and mendicancy. Even though many of them are undocumented and often ignored by society, this doesn’t stop them from being ambitious and entrepreneurial. This is the case with Coco Bertin, who runs CJARC, one of Cameroon’s most solicited rehabilitation centres for the visually impaired. Bertin speaks fondly of his centre, saying “I am morally gratified by the fact that I am able to help other people, so that they can share in my happiness.” 
Upon graduating in 1986, Coco Bertin, who is visually impaired, received a modest financial incentive of CFA 61.500 from the Rehabilitation Institute for the Blind in Buea. Rather than indulge in mendicancy as is the case with so many blind people, he decided to start an organisation that could provide strategic education for the visually impaired. This decision was greatly influenced by the fact that people with disabilities who go to school find it very difficult coping with a system which does not take them into account when drawing the curriculum. 
In order to achieve this, he started working on the furniture for his organisation, which he named COJARY (it was later renamed CJARC [Club des Jeunes Aveugles Réhabilités du Cameroun] in 1988) from his bedroom in his parents’ house, and as well joined forces with Martin Luther, another visually impaired person who graduated from the same school as himself. From Bertin’s parents’ bedroom, the activities moved to the veranda of the Departmental Delegation of Social Affairs in the Essos neighbourhood. 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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The Last Refugees in Choucha, Tunisia...
Choucha
By Filippo Del Bubba
16 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Choucha Refugee Camp, Southern Tunisia

The UNHCR Choucha Refugee Camp opened in 2011, seven kilometres away from the Ras Ajdir border crossing, to help the thousands of people fleeing the conflict in Libya. Most of the those who fled in 2011, returned home, but some 4,000 could not go back for fear of persecution. These individuals were granted refugee status by the UNHCR. Tunisia did not – and still does not – consider applicants for refugee status. According to UNHCR, most of the refugees from Choucha have already been taken by the United States (1,717) and Norway (485). The EU has been fairly strict on resettlement; Germany took the most refugees at 201, Britain took three, Italy two and France one. However, some still remain as they have nowhere else to go.
The Choucha camp was officially closed in June 2013, but approximately one hundred refugees still remain there. They insisted on remaining in the camp after it was closed despite the fact that all UNHCR food, water, and medical services were cut-off on June 30. 260 of the camp’s inhabitants, categorized as “rejected asylum seekers,” now find themselves in a dire situation. Falling outside of the UNHCR’s mandate, they are not entitled to the integration services that the organization offers to refugees and asylum seekers. The last time that the rejected asylum seekers here received food distribution aid was in October 2012. One of them is Bright O Samson, who is fighting against eviction from the camp, and is demanding resettlement to a safe third country with effective system of asylum seeker protection. Ismail is from Sudan and he fled to Libya in 2003 due to the war in his country. There, he found peace and a job as a mechanic, but the 2011 uprising forced him to leave again and cross the border into Tunisia. With no official structure supporting them, Ismail and other refugees from Chad, Ghana, Sudan, Liberia, and many other African countries, say they feel like they've been totally abandoned.

Full 30 minute video available: http://www.transterramedia.com/media/49074

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Ebola: The Burial Team
Unification Town
By kierankesner
22 Sep 2014

In Unification Town, Liberia young men take on the grim job of burying the dead lost to the Ebola virus currently devastating West Africa. Careful preparation is made before entering the homes of the deceased, and the team must disinfect thoroughly after removing the body. Family members watching the burial from a distance are instructed not to visit the grave for at least a year. Without proper burial, the bodies of Ebola victims could perpetuate the spread of the virus that has already claimed over 2,500 lives.

Burial teams in Sierra Leone have recently come under attack as locals become suspicious of aid workers trying to prevent the further spread of the virus that has been slowly ravaging larger and larger areas of West Africa since the first case was discovered in December 2013. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, by September 2014 the number of confirmed cases exceeded those in all previous outbreaks of the disease.

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The Gold Mines of Burkina Faso
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
24 Mar 2014

This photo essay gives an insight into Burkina Faso’s growing gold industry and depicts the humans that risk their lives extracting this precious metal.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 02
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
24 Mar 2014

The women of the surrounding villages come by to collect the potable groundwater as the miners switch on the pump.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 08
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
24 Mar 2014

Children have to work in the artisanal gold mines of Bouda in order to support their families, despite the fact that child labour is illegal in Burkina Faso.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 09
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
23 Mar 2014

A steep and unsupported mine shaft with a depth of about ten meters.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 03
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
22 Mar 2014

A woman carries excavated soil from a mine shaft on her head.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 11
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
22 Mar 2014

Miners pull out bags of soil out of one of the deeper shafts.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 01
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
22 Mar 2014

A young miner wears an improvised headlamp after coming out of a mine shaft near Bouda.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 07
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
22 Mar 2014

A group of women washes their clothes and also pans for gold.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 06
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
22 Mar 2014

A miner squats in front of a generator which is used to pump water out of the deeper mine shafts.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 05
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
22 Mar 2014

A boy sells little plastic bags containing water to the workers in the vicinity.

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Burkina Faso Gold Mines 04
Yako
By Dennis & Patrick Weinert
22 Mar 2014

A small hut that is used by the workers to stow away tools and clothes.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
22 Sep 2013

L’uranium nigérien permet d’éclairer une ampoule française sur trois, tandis que seul un Nigérien sur dix a accès à l’électricité. Le 20 septembre, l’Etat sahélien a lancé un audit des mines d’uranium détenues par Areva, afin que l’exploitation du minerai contribue d’avantage à son développement.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 12
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A shack that serves dinner is announced by a neon light above a row of cooking put full of rice and leaf sauce. Here, Malian migrants after the night meal, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 3
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

After the night’s prayer, reading of Koran under the white neon of a shop, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 8
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A family sat down for a diner on a laterite road, shined by a torch made in China. Yantala, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 11
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

At sunset, the inhabitants of Niamey gather under the unusual light bulbs which break through obscurity.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 9
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

Session hairdressing in the University of Niamey, under the light of a bulb suspended to the branch of an acacia.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 2
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

Bike repairs under the white neon of one of the rare bookshops of the city-center of Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 10
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

Furtive outline of a young veiled girl in the dark night of Niamey, only lighted on by the headlines of a car. Only 10% of Niger’s inhabitants have access to electricity.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 7
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A Nigerien makes his ablutions before the night’s prayer in a common courtyard of Niamey. His sun makes out his gestures in the darkness.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 6
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

Prayer, a major event that occurs in the dark in a society where more than 95 percent of the people are Muslims.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 5
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

From afar, itinerary sellers look like huge fireflies. When one comes closer, he can gradually make out the shape of their wheelbarrow carrying cigarettes, drugs imported from Nigeria, China and India… An entire bazaar illuminated by a torch made in China.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 1
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

An ice-cream seller below a white neon in Niamey. Without electricity, ice-cream is an utopia and his fridge is empty.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
04 Sep 2013

Three former workers of Areva's uranium mine in Arlit. On the foreground, Mamane Sani, a quarry worker for twenty years, is today paralyzed down his left side.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 1
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

La nuit sans lumière donne à l'existence des Nigériens quelque chose de vulnérable, d’éphémère. Comme si leur vie pesait moins que celle des citoyens bien éclairés sous les lampadaires publics.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 5
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

Une famille attablée sur un chemin de latérite, pour un dîner éclairé par une lampe torche fabriquée en Chine. Quartier Yantala, Niamey.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 4
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
28 Aug 2013

Les inégalités d’accès à l'énergie sont à l’origine des différences de développement entre un Nigérien et un Français. Ce dernier peut surfer sur Internet, prendre le TGV et le métro ; autant de services refusés au Nigérien lambda », dit Moustapha Kadi, président du Coddae.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
25 Aug 2013

Nigerien uranium lights up one-third of French bulbs, meanwhile only one-tenth of Nigerien have access to electricity. On September 20, the Sahelien State launched an audit of the uranium mines owned by French company Areva on his soil, so that the ore extraction finally benefits to Nigerien’s development. An initiative backed by its population. Thousands of citizens demonstrated the 12th of October to denounce the "radioactivity contimination" provoked by Areva and its lack of interest for local development. Report.

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Red Carpet interview with Ibinabo Fib...
Yenagoa, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
08 May 2013

Ibinabo Fiberesima is one of the popular actresses that rocked the Nigerian movie industry in the 90s. She was also a beauty queen. The soft-spoken actress was elected the first female president of the Actors’ Guild of Nigeria last year and has since committed much efforts in transforming the guild.

H264 Media interviewed her on the Red Carpet of the African Movie Academy Awards

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Manual Labour
Yenagoa, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
08 May 2013

A woman chopping down cassava plants from the proposed site of the 1st Film school In Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria

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Hollywood Contra Nollywood
Abuja, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
08 May 2013

An article from a journalist friend about the state of the Nigeria Film Industry

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Unemployed youth roaming the street o...
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
07 May 2013

Nollywood film industry the world's third largest film industry resides in Nigeria, churning out approximately forty to fifty low budget movies per week and employs over half a million young people.

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A Storm in Africa
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
07 May 2013

this picture was taken on our way from the Lagos international Airport to Bayelsa State.

Storms are very common in Nigeria during the spring and summer seasons, it mostly starts suddenly and can last anything from 10 minutes to several hours and sometimes days

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Screenshot of Lagos Wharf
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
07 May 2013

I spent almost a full day at the Marina having a good walk as it was stunning, lots of lovely ship and little boats to see and some interesting character we met along the way.