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Mayna Kollai Festival 09
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: A devotee stand next to the statue minutes before the signal is given to destroy it. The costumes the devotees wear are inspired by Tamil Nadu's street theatre, where kings fight against all odds during plays that can last for days. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 10
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: The sand statue representing the pregnant demon. The statue's sex is consecrated by a burning candle. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 11
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: A devotee is placed on top of the demon's pregnant belly. When he'll receive an offering from his peers the razing of the statue can commence. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 12
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: Policemen in their typical kepi hat make sure the situation does not get out of control. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 16
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: The offering is brought to the top of the statue by a pushing and pulling crowd. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 17
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: A live chicken is offered to the devotees and placed on the statue's belly, giving the signal for the destruction to start. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 20
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: People gather on top of the statue, while fireworks are lit all over near the festival grounds. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 13
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

Mayana Kollai Festival: The devotees bring a richly decorated chariot at the feet of the demon before the signal is given for the crushing of the statue is given. During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Mayna Kollai Festival 02
Pooranakuppam, Tamil Nadu
By Matteo Vegetti
24 Feb 2015

During Mayana Kollai Festival in Tamil Nadu devotees gather around a huge sand statue that represents a demon. The statue will be destroyed during the course of the celebration by men dressed in makeshift king costumes.

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Child Labor in Bangladesh 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
24 Feb 2015

A boy is working in a brickfield only for $1.5 where adult people work for its double.

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Trailing the Mughals 12
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

One of the highlights of a visit to the stunning Amer Fort is the elephant ride up the hill to the main entrance. These venerated animals are decorated with traditional painted patterns and effortlessly transport visitors up the steep slope to the fort.

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Trailing the Mughals 13
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Amber Fort is a city that was ruled by raja man Singh. It is a perfect example of a Hindu style fort. Wide ramparts, carved gates and cobbled paths of the fort overlooks the Maota Lake.
The palace was lived in by the Rajput Maharajas and their families. At the entrance to the palace near the fort’s Ganesh Gate, there is also a temple dedicated to Sila Devi, a goddess of the Chaitanya cult which was given to Raja Man Singh when he had defeated the Raja of Jessore, Bengal in 1604.
At the Amber Fort, musicians play traditional India music and there is a restaurant overlooking the city that serves amazing regional food in the evening.

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Trailing the Mughals 14
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Savoury snacks are popular in India. They can be found at each corner of the city. Bhelpuri is a savoury Indian snack, and is also a type of chaat. It is made out of puffed rice, vegetables and a tangy tamarind sauce. Bhelpuri is thought to have originated within the Gucafes and street food stalls of Mumbai, and the recipe has spread to most parts of India where it has been modified to suit local food availability. It is also said to be originated from Bhadang, a spicy namkeen from Western Maharashtra.

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Trailing the Mughals 15
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Tourists are invited to visit textile workshops that are spread in the old city. Hand prints is the landmark of Jaipur City. Sober, low toned colors and delicate lines, creating finer designs like the poppy, rose and lotus, usually against a white background, are well known characteristic of fabrics that are printed at Sanganer. While the motifs are conventionally big and bold in Bagru, with the dabu (resist-printing) and the dyeing process producing a reddish black shade- with wild flowers, buds and foliage providing inspiration to the printers of Bagru.Legend has it that it was probably towards the end of the 17th century that this art form developed here. Thanks to the constant wars with the Mughals and Marathas, many printers migrated from Gujarat to Rajasthan. Under the royal patronage, by the end of the 18th century this industry was fully developed in Sanganer. Dyeing of Jaipur Printed Cloth is by use of vegetable colors.

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Trailing the Mughals 10
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
22 Feb 2015

The column has craving from different civilisation influence such as Hindu, Persian, Christian, Buddhist and Jain.
The city of Fatehpur Sikri was founded in 1569 by the Mughal emperor Akbar and served as the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1571 to 1585. After his military victories over Chittor and Ranthambore, Akbar decided to move his capital from Agra to a Fatehpur in order to honor the Sufi Salim Chishti. Here he commenced the construction of a planned walled city. He supervised the construction of a series of royal palaces, harems, courts, a mosque and many other facilities. The city's name means victorious

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Trailing the Mughals 11
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
22 Feb 2015

A duo of young boys playing traditional India music. The dancer boy is dressed like a girl to attract tourists.The musician is playing the sitar. The sitar is a plucked stringed instrument used mainly in Hindustani music and Indian classical music. The instrument is believed to have been derived from the veena, an ancient Indian instrument, which was modified by a Mughal court musician to conform with the tastes of his Persian patrons and named after a Persian instrument called the Setar.

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Trailing the Mughals 08
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
21 Feb 2015

Cycling is one of the most popular modes of transport in India. It is powered by man and doesn't require any additional cost. That is the reason why in this emergent country, a great number of people use their bicycle to commute.

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Trailing the Mughals 09
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
21 Feb 2015

Indians are proud of their most impressive castle, the Taj Mahal. It is also the most romantic story in India history.The crown of palaces is a white marble mausoleum located in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India. Commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan to house the worldly remains of his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal. His loss was terrible and he was in a great depression. Shah Jahan spent 20 years supervising the work of his late wife's Mausoleum. The Taj Mahal stands on the southern bank of the Yamuna River. The mausoleum is widely recognized as "the jewel of Muslim art in India" and remains as one of the world’s most celebrated structures and a symbol of India’s rich history.
This is a perfect example of Mughal architecture, a perfect blend of elements from Islamic, Persian, Ottoman Turkish as well as Indian style.

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Trailing the Mughals 02
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

The great mosque of Old Delhi is the largest in India, with a courtyard capable of holding 25,000 devotees. Built in 1644, it is one of the greatest achievements of the architectural extravagance of Shah Jahan, the Mughal emperor who built the Taj Mahal and the Red Fort. In order to enter the Friday Mosque tourists are asked to wear a special gown handed over at the entrance and to visit the Mosque barefoot. The mosque is a gathering point for Indian families and devotees who flock to pray there from all over India.

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Trailing the Mughals 03
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Chandni Chowk is Delhi's most famous and exciting bazaar. The "moonlit square" or "moonlit market", is one of the oldest and busiest markets in Old Delhi, now in central north Delhi, India. Built in the 17th century by the Mughal Emperor of India, Shah Jahan, and designed by his daughter Jahan Ara, the market was once divided by canals to reflect the moonlight. It remains one of India's largest wholesale markets. It is exciting to stroll around its alleyways and to discover the tiny shops selling food, textile and jewels.

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Trailing the Mughals
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Street vendor selling Bhel puri, one of the most common all-day snacks in northern India: a crunchy, cold, sweet-and-sour mix of puffed rice, sev, chopped onion, potato and tamarind chutney. It has to be mixed and eaten on the spot, and most vendors will concoct their own variations.

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Trailing the Mughals 05
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

The feet of a rickshaw driver. With his own strength, he pulls up to three clients at a time. Though rapidly being replaced by motorized three-wheeled rickshaws, the bicycle rickshaw still has a strong presence in much of Old Delhi.

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Trailing the Mughals 06
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

This is a typical column in Qutab Minar monument. Qutab Minar is 73m high "victory tower" built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak immediately after he defeated Delhi's last Hindu kingdom. At the foot of the tower is the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque. It is the very first mosque that was built in India. Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, began construction of the Qutab Minar in 1200 AD. The unfinished monument was then completed by his successor, Iltutmush who added three more stories. It was not only 1368 that Firoz Shah Tughlak erected the fifth and the last storey.

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Trailing the Mughals 07
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Paras Komar, a Bihar marble-stone craftsman, showcases his trade at Handicrafts Museum in Delhi, India.

Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Shipyard workers pose for the camera in a year near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

A shipyard worker gets prepared to weld near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Two men are hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A boy stops to pose for a photo while playing near a ship recycling yard in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A man is hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

17 year-old Ashraful has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. He breaks down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers to be scrapped. Most of them live by eating rice and vegetables. Ashraful cannot remember when he last ate meat.