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Ship-breaking yards (9 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

A worker is standing next to an ocean vessel that will be dismantled within six months.

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Ship-breaking yards (8 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Workers at an ocean vessel near Sitakund, Bangladesh dismantle a ship. Safety and environment regulations are mostly ignored.

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Ship-breaking yards (7 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Ocean vessels, ready to be dismantled by Bangladeshi and migrant workers, are stranded at the muddy beaches of Sitakund, Bangladesh along with old life boats. The vessels are dismantled by the workers within six months. Safety and environment regulations are mostly ignored.

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Ship-breaking yards (6 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Workers at the beaches of Sitakund, Bangladesh - where ocean vessels are being dismantled within six months.

In addition to the health and safety issues, workers work extremely long hours for little pay, earning around 1-3 dollars per day.

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Ship-breaking yards (5 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

The Bangladeshi economy relies on income and employment for the ship-breaking industry, however, the workers are exposed to toxins such as asbestos and other materials that cause damage to their health.

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Ship-breaking yards (4 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Workers at the ship-breaking yards in Bangladeshi town of Sitakund. In the majority of the shipyards, workers are being deprived of their rights. Fatal injuries are common. Safety and environment regulations during the dismantling process are mostly ignored.

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Ship-breaking yards (3 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Workers at the ship-breaking yards in Bangladeshi town of Sitakund use rope in order to dismantle a ship. The employees are exposed to tough working conditions with little labour rights.

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Ship-breaking yards (2 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Area at the ship-breaking yards in Sitakund, near Chittagong. Piece by piece ships are dismantled. Workers face tough conditions, extreme hard labor, fatal working incidents, the exposure of asbestos and toxic waste are among the deadly threats.

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Ship-breaking yards (1 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

An injured employee at the ship-breaking yards grasps onto his wooden crutches. Over the last 30 years there has been over 1000 work related injuries as workers are exposed to extreme conditions with minimal safety precautions.

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Ship-breaking yards (24 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Ocean vessels are placed on the muddy beach of Sitakund where they will be dismantled piece by piece by workers from the ship-breaking companies.

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Ship-breaking yards (23 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

A huge ocean vessel is being dismantled by workers from a ship-breaking company in Sitakund, Bangladesh

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Ship-breaking yards (22 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

This is the area of ship-breaking companies in Sitakund, Bangladesh. Although this industry is very profitable, it carries a number of environmental and human health hazards. For example, ships are not properly cleaned before beaching and often discharge dangerous chemical and fumes.

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Ship-breaking yards (21 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

The ship-breaking yards in Sitakund, Bangladesh. Between 1,000-2,000 people have died in this line of work in Bangladesh, according to local organizations.

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Ship-breaking yards (20 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

A ship is being dismantled piece by piece at the ship-breaking yards in Sitakund, Bangladesh.

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Ship-breaking yards (19 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

An enormous ocean vessel is being dismantled at the ship-breaking yards in Sitakund, Bangladesh. The demolition of ships is a very dangerous occupation. According to the Bangladeshi media, more than 400 workers have been killed and 6000 seriously injured, over the last two decades.

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Ship-breaking yards (18 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Workers at the ship-breaking yards at the Sitakund beach, where enormous ocean vessels are being dismantled. Some of the ships can measure up to 350 meter long and weight up to 10-15,000 tons.

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Ship-breaking yards (16 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Ship-breaking yards in Sitakund, Bangladesh. In the majority of the shipyards, workers are being deprived of their rights. Fatal injuries are common. Safety and environment regulations during the dismantling process are mostly ignored.

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Ship-breaking yards (15 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Rooms where toxic waste of the ship-dismantling process is being stored. Nevertheless, environment regulations are often ignored and toxic waste and oil are discharged in the ocean.

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Ship-breaking yards (14 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

A worker in the ship-breaking yard area near Sitakund, Bangladesh.

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Port Gabtoli (6 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (5 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (4 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (3 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (2 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (1 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (7 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By U.S. Editor
05 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Relics of Another War
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
01 Apr 2012

An abandoned Soviet tank on-top of a hill overlooking Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Afghan Flag
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
31 Mar 2012

Afghan flag waving in the wind on top of a hill in Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Rebel Without a Cause
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
31 Mar 2012

Motorcycle on-top parked on top of a hill, Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Lady in Red
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
31 Mar 2012

A lady dresses in red walking in Kabul, Afghanistan

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Three's a Crowd
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
18 Mar 2012

Father riding a bike with two young boys on the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Kabul Rush Hour
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
17 Mar 2012

A man taking his produce to market in Kabul, Afghanistan.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 Mar 2012

Gul-e-Khandana, the school's head teacher, helped save the girls from the Taliban at the school where she taught. She oversees the morning assembly with her students.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 Mar 2012

Head teacher Gul Khandana prays with her students in a girl primary school.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 Mar 2012

Gul Khandana, a head teacher at Sijban girls primary school in Swat Valley attends morning assembly with her students.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 Mar 2012

Head teacher Gul Khandana inspects morning assembly at her girls primary school. Th village of Sijban and surrounding areas were under Taliban rule for a short period before Pakistani army operations began.