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Bara Imambara of royal city Lucknow I
Lucknow, Utter Pradesh, India
By newspoint
17 Oct 2012

Bara Imambara is the grandest building of Lucknow, including the large Asfi mosque, the bhulbhulayah (labyrinth), and a well with running water. Two imposing gateways lead to the main hall. The Bara Imambara was built in 1784 during a devastating famine and one of Asaf-ud-Daula's objectives in embarking on this grandiose project was to provide employment for people in the region. According to reports, the famine continued for over a decade and the construction of the building continued for this time. It is said that ordinary people used to work in the day building up the edifice, while noblemen and other elite were called in at night to break down all the structure built each day, as they were incapable of doing anything else. These see-saw efforts continued until the period of famine was over. It was a project that preceded a Keynesian-like intervention for employment generation.

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Bhadohi carpet will exhibit in Maha K...
Bhadohi, Utter Pradesh, India
By newspoint
11 Oct 2012

Maha Kumbh mela (fair) is about to come and carpets weaver is busy for exhibition preparation. Indian Carpets are renowned the world over for their exquisite designs attractive colours. The magnificence of Indian carpet weaving and the intricate patterns that have emerged from it have substantially increased India's carpet exports and placed it prominently in the international carpet map.
Carpet weaving was brought to India by the great Mughal Emperor Akbar in the 16th century. Some of the most exclusive carpets were created during the Mughal reign, each carpet unlike the other but infused with a common magic of colours and exotic design.
A carpet weaver's skills are his own and the designs he evolves are from his mind to be translated in to beautiful form with the help of wool and silk.

Sound Byte-Javahar Lal, Organizer (HINDI)

Good News for Carpet Industries, Director of kumbh mela permitted Carpet Exhibition in the fair. Best unit of carpet can exhibit in Kumbh mela 2013. This year on international level Maha Kumbh Fair will celebrate; So Carpet Industries can also get international facility over there. Those artisans can not introduce their art in international market they can show here.

Sound Byte-Abdul Hadi, Carpet weaver (HINDI)

“I am Happy and welcome to this announcement.it will be first time than our 200 year old carpet industry introduces both national and international level, it is Maha kumbh mela (fair) everybody will come here across the country. We get a good chance for exhibit our Art.” Local News Agency: News Point TV
Shooting Dateline: October 11, 2012
Shooting Location: Bhadohi , Utter Pradesh (INDIA)
Publishing Time: October 11, 2012
Length: 0:10:14
Video Size: 250 MB
Language: Hindi
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera:
SHOTLIST:
1.Camra pan left
2. Mid Close Up shot of Carpets factory
3. Mid Close Up shot of Carpets design
4. Mid Long shot of weaver
5. Close Up shot weavers hands
6. Close Up shot of weavers
7. Mid Long Shot of weaver
8. Closup Shots of weaver hands
9. over the shoulder shot of weaver
10. Mid Long Shot of weaver tough up the carpet
11. Various shots of making carpet
12.Long shot of raw material of carpet

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Congress General Secretary Rahul Gand...
Jammu, Kashmir, India
By newspoint
05 Oct 2012

Congress General Secretary Rahul Gandhi began his 2-day visit to Kashmir Valley amid growing differences among ruling coalition partners, National Conference and Congress, over empowerment of Panchayats in Jammu and Kashmir and continued threats to the grassroots representatives.
He will be bringing along a powerful business delegation that includes among others Ratan Tata and Kumar Manglam Birla. Rahul scheduled to attend the foundation stone laying ceremony of 6.5 km long Z-Morh Tunnel in Sonamarg. The foundation stone is laid by Union Minister for Roads and Transport Dr CP Joshi. The tunnel is aimed at providing all-weather connectivity with Ladakh.
he said adding that he extends hand to Omar Abdullah like Jawaharlal Nehru extended it to Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah for holistic and comprehensive development of Jammu and Kashmir. Rahul Gandhi referred to the relations between Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah and Jawaharlal Nehru and between Rajiv Gandhi and Dr. Farooq Abdullah adding that he wants to strengthen these relations and extends hand to Omar Abdullah in a similar way as Jawaharlal Nehru extended it to Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah.

Rahul Gandhi said that he is Kashmiri himself and wants to associate with the people of the State in resolving their difficulties.

Byte - Rahul Gandhi, Congress General Secretary

“I myself am from a Kashmiri family and want to have lifelong relations with the people of Jammu and Kashmir. I want to hear you, understand your problems and work for their redressal . Every State enjoyed share in the development process”.

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FARM TO FORK trailer
Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
03 Oct 2012

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!
This trailer is about a documentary of 38mn (nepali version with english subtitles) in HD 1080i. Possible to get an international version.

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Red Light Districts: A Story About Pr...
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
By newspoint
29 Sep 2012

Sonagachi is one of Calcutta’s largest red light districts – narrow alleys, lined with small ‘apartments’ and corner stores form a confusing and nightmarish maze. The buildings lean into the street, the roads are crowded, it’s hot. The city seems to want to eat itself. Sonagachi is one of the very few places in India where women have a higher street profile than men. That’s because most of them are prostitutes. Approximately 9000 women, many of them trafficked into the country from Bangladesh or Nepal, work in Sonagachi. Around 60.000 more sex workers are active across Calcutta.

In overcrowded India things don’t come in small measures. Two and a half million women and
children (around 500.000 prostitutes in India are under 16) are working in the country’s sex industry.
More than 5 million people are already HIV positive. Governments, both local and national, do little
to tackle the increasing risk of a large-scale AIDS epidemic. Large red light areas like Sonagachi are
at the centre of a problem that may soon spiral out of control and affect millions of people in Bengal
and the neighbouring state of Bihar. Sex workers are socially shunned and prostitution is illegal,
which makes the women in Sonagachi extremely susceptible to extortion, blackmail, rape or murder
by local gangsters, pimps and the police.

Byte: Sudeshna Basu Mukharjee, Sociologist

Byte: Pinki, Sex worker

“I am living at this place as a mother no one wants to live. I want to make my children’s future bright , When we’ll get older then our children will not going to support us.”

Byte: Juhi Tamang, Teacher

“My mother does not want me to join this field. Till the time I can do work hard, I’ll do.”

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“WITH TIBET IN SIGHT: A TALE OF ONE M...
Pangong Tso Lake, India
By Andreanewilliams
20 Sep 2012

Nearly 14 000 feet above sea level, on the arid shores of Pangong “Tso” (lake), flies a lone Tibetan flag.

On occasion, travellers manage to make the 5-hour journey here from Leh during the short summer season, stopping at monasteries and roadside yurts along the way. And if they travel as far down the lakeside as possible - without stepping into Chinese territory - to the remote village of Spangmik, they will undoubtedly see it whipping about in the wind.

In democratic India, this flag's presence may seem benign - but on the opposite shore of Pangong Tso’s salty waters, lies Tibet; and just a few kilometers south of Spangmik, lies an army checkpost.

In such close proximity to Tibet, 68-year-old Tsering Dondup is literally flying the Tibetan flag in the face of China.

Pangong Lake sits on the Sino-India Line of Actual Control, with more than 60 per cent of its 134km length being under Chinese control.

Dondup, himself, first arrived in India in 1959 after his parents were killed in clashes with Chinese troops at the height Tibet’s occupation in the 1950s. Initially motivated to avenge the death of his parents, Dondup went on to join the Indian Army in Mussoorie, northern India, in 1968.

Fifteen years later, he met and fell in love with a young woman from Spangmik village. In 1989, they married.

He smacks his lips together and lets out a sigh, as he reflects on his relationship with his wife of 23 years. “My wife may be illiterate, but she loves me so deeply.”

Following his marriage, he became focused on creating a home - in plain sight of Tibet - with his new wife on the rocky banks of Pangong Tso.

But as a reminder of his past, Dondup flies a little piece of his history on the flagpole outside of his home, with the hope of one day returning to Tibet.

“I want to see the birds, the sheep, the horses. I want to see them again," he says. "Are they there, or not? I don’t know."

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Songs from Karakul Lake
Karakul Lake, Kizilsu Kirgiz Autonomous Prefecture, China
By aruszka
05 Sep 2012

Located in Kizilsu Kirghiz Autonomous Prefecture, Karakul Lake, also known as the "Black lake," is home to this child who lives alone in a necropolis along the shore.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

Thumb sm
Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Delhi's Urban Crisis -- Growing Waste...
Delhi, India
By bajpairavi
05 Jul 2012

Indian capital Delhi and its satellite towns have nearly 23 million residents, making it the world’s second most populous metropolitan region. Its population is growing at a phenomenal pace, demanding a commensurate increase in infrastructure support to keep the city livable. But the rate of development is lagging behind.

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The Landless People of Noakhali (6 of...
Noakhali, Bangladesh
By Jeff Mcallister
06 Jun 2012

Noakhali is considered one of the most fundamentalist regions in the country. The lack of education available outside of the Islamic Madrasa system is a common complaint among the landless.

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The victims lost everything
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Standing in his room
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Trying to control the fire
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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They lost everything
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Searching Through Debris
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Shamoly slum on fire
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Fire In The Slum
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By U.S. Editor
16 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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The whole slum was burnt
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
16 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Where she stands
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
16 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Made in Bangladesh
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By U.S. Editor
10 Apr 2012

Bangladesh’s garment industry, responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports, employs an estimated two to three million people, 80% of which are women, in over 4,000 factories all over the country. Although violating national law, some suppliers still employ children under the age of 14. Workers, reliant on their wages to support their families, are highly underpaid; most people earn approximately 1,500-2,000 Taka (15 - 20 Euros) per month while working 12 hour days, 6 days a week.

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The Dangerous Life of Bangladesh Ship...
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Mais Istanbuli
10 Apr 2012

Ship-breaking is known as the breaking or recirculation of old ships for financial return. Old ships are sold so that the valuable steel can be reused. About 95 percent of a ship’s mass can be recycled.

Until the 1960s, ship-breaking was concentrated in western countries like the United States, Germany, United Kingdom or Italy. From the early 1980s, the majority of the world’s vessels taken out of service were sent to India, China, Pakistan or Bangladesh.

The workers at the ship-breaking yards in Sitakund, situated north of Chittagong in the Bay of Bengal, face the toughest working conditions of the whole country. Extremely hard labour, fatal working incidents, the exposure of abestos and toxic waste are among the deadly threats to those working in the ship-dismantling industry. Every step could be their last. Far away from their villages, the workers seldom see their families. They do all of this for only $1-3 per day.

Risky working conditions, environmental pollution and the adoption of child labor in the ship-breaking industry have drawn international attention on Bangladesh’s ship-dismantling. Changes occured but are far from international standards.

Over 100,000 workers are employed at ship breaking yards worldwide. It is estimated that some 50,000 people are directly employed in the ship-breaking industry in Bangladesh.

Local organisations in Bangladesh estimate that some 1,000-2,000 workers have died in the last 30 years, and many more have suffered serious injuries.

The ship breaking industry in Bangladesh is estimated worth an annual turn over of around 1.5 billion dollars.

Today access to the ship-breaking yards is very limited. Journalists and photographers, who covered grievance in the area, aren’t welcome anymore. The people of Bangladesh are aware of the problems and willing to change the situation.
The Labor Law Act 2006 has improved conditons on health, safety, working hours and compensation – but due to lack of political will and resources change is still not on the way.

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Made in Bangladesh (6 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Female workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (5 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Child labor in Bangladesh's garment industry. In a hot and dusty room kids package jeans for export.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (4 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young and sometimes underaged workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (3 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young and sometimes underaged workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (2 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young and often under aged workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuos riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (1 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

An under aged boy working for a sub-supplier in Dhaka's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the involved companies.

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Made in Bangladesh (10 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young kids in the streets of Dhaka working as delivery boys for sub suppliers in the garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (9 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Worker in Dhaka's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (8 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Underage workers in Dhaka's textile industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (7 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Textile workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Ship-Breaking Yards (13 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

An ocean vessel at the ship-breaking yards of Sitakund, Bangladesh waiting to be dismantled by the workers. A worker at Bangladesh's ship-breaking yards in Sitakund is standing next to a big ocean vessel that will be dismantled within 6 months.

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Ship-Breaking Yards (12 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Life boats of dismantled ocean vessels cover the muddy beaches of Sitakund, Bangladesh after everything else of the ship has been cut off and sold.

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Ship-breaking Yards (11 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

A worker at Bangladesh's ship-breaking yards in Sitakund ist standing next to a big ocean vessel that will be dismantled within 6 months. Although this industry is very profitable, it carries a number of environmental and human health hazards. Ships are not properly cleaned before beaching and often discharge dangerous chemical and fumes.

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Ship-breaking yards (10 of 24)
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Barrels with oil are standing next an ocean vessel on the muddy beach of Sitakund Bangladehs. The vessel will be dismantled by workers within six months. Safety and environment regulations are mostly ignored.