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Kobane Drone Footage Highlights (Trai...
Kobane
By Joe Lukawski
04 Oct 2015

Video shot between October 5 and December 10, 2015.
Drone footage showing reconstruction efforts in the Kurdish city of Kobane, on the Syrian border with Turkey. Workers and machinery remove debris in the areas that were destroyed during intense fighting between Kurdish forces and Islamic State militants. In the outskirts of the city, refugee camps were set up for people who fled Raqqa, the capital of the so called Islamic State.

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Houthi Militants Close Ibb Butane Sta...
Ibb
By Wahib Mashrah
26 May 2015

Ibb, Yemen
May 26, 2015

Houthi militants in the central Yemeni city of Ibb closed the only station for butane distribution in the city. The measure is an attempt to force provincial authorities to revoke a decision to raise the price of gas.
A Houthi military commander, who introduced himself as Abu Nidal, said that he closed the station because its manager and workers fled and left it unattended. He also explained that the station manager had refused to comply with an order by a Houthi judge to not raise the gas price.
Abu Nidal also said that Houthi militants, who refer to themselves as Ansar Allah, will take over the supervision of gas distribution in the city.

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'Ghouta Dry': Handmade Cola Under Siege
Misraba, Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
24 May 2015

May 2015,
Misraba, Eastern Ghouta

Residents of the rebel-held town of Misraba in Eastern Ghouta, have created a factory to make soft drinks with little resources and very simple means.
The workers of the factory use alimentary acids and preservatives, which they find in pharmacies, and using a drill they mix the powder with water. Once the melange is ready, they fill it in second hand glass bottles.
It's been two years since Eastern Ghouta has been under a tight military siege imposed by the Assad regime forces and allies.

Transcription:

00:00 – 00:090
Hand-written sign in Arabic reads: “Local cola. Freedom tastes sweeter.”
03:38 – 03:41
Hand-written sign in Arabic reads: “Local cola. Freedom tastes sweeter.”
03:42 – 03:47
Hand-written sign in Arabic reads:
“Creativity grows as the siege becomes stricter. Ghouta Dry is the beverage of the siege. Cheers, young men of Ghouta.” SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Saeed al-Khawly, Factory Manager
04:41 – 05:18
“In the name of God, the merciful the compassionate; Given the suffocating siege and the very hot weather, we thought of creating any project that could alleviate [the impact of] the siege on people in Ghouta. We thought about it and found that the best thing to do would be to start a cola factory – something to cool people in this very hot weather.
Thanks be to God, we managed to start a cola factory in Ghouta with the simplest means.”
05:19 – 05:48
Q: Do the substances you are using have any effect on consumers’ health?
A: No, thanks be to God. We are using preservatives and some acids that are available in pharmacies; they are alimentary acids, not chemical ones. They [the acids] are used in food substances. The added preservatives make the beverage consumable for six months.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Abdu, Street Vendor
05:49 – 06:08
“Customers say it is very good and it is delivered to me. I am selling about 300 to 400 bottles a day. We offer them cold to customers. They are enjoying the beverage and quenching their thirst. It is hot in Ghouta and we are under siege. This is very good.”

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Ingenious Invention in Besieged Easte...
Douma, Eastern Ghouta, Syria
By Jawad Arbini
12 May 2015

May 13, 2015
Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Two years of being under siege has forced the citizens of Eastern Ghouta, near Damascus, to come up with ingenious inventions in order to survive.
This video shot in Douma, shows a heater invented by 60 year old Abu Yassin that uses solar energy to boil water.

Abu Yassin previously worked as a glazier but his business has dropped since the 2011 uprising. Nowadays he is using the glass and an unused satellite dish to build a solar concentration heater.

Using small pieces of glass and mirrors glued to the surface of the satellite dish, Abu Yassin directs the dish to face the sunlight which is reflected by the mirrors to hit the kettle or the cooking pot that sits in a basket in front of the dish.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Yassin

03:32- 06:03

Q: How did you come up with the idea of making a solar cooker?
A: After the siege, we started to look for ways to substitute gas. I saw this on the internet but nobody had applied it. I tried it and we found out that it was excellent. We tried it and it worked.
We used it to heat water and cook. People started demanding it. When we showed it, it was in high demand. People started to bring small pieces of mirrors that they had at home, and I showed them how to cut them, paste them together and place a basket. There is high demand for this.

04:17
Q: How do you make the solar cooker? How does it work?
A: The mirrors are cut in squares so that they would have similar shape and they are glued to the satellite dish using silicon or al-Shuala glue. Then you need to put thick metal bars to hold the cooking pot. This is it. It is simple.

04:43
Q: Let us talk about how long it takes to cook something. What have you cooked with it?
A: We have cooked everything; all dishes. There is not anything that we did not cook with this. It takes about half an hour to cook something. It is the same time it takes to cook something using a gas cooker.
Q: What did you cook?
A: We cooked fava beans with rice, pees with rice, mujaddara [a dish prepared with lentils]; all dishes. There is not anything that we did not cook with this.

05:13
Q: Tell us how your idea became a commercial project. How many clients were able to use this invention?
A: When I made this people clients started to tell their relatives or others who have seen it and I started to receive more customers through them. So far I made 20 or 25 dishes.
Of course, this helps to break the siege; you can use something instead of gas by employing simple tools. Anyone who has mirrors we cut them for him. It does not cost anything. The cost is very low and usually people would have a satellite dish. The customer brings the satellite dish and the mirrors. I only charge for cutting, which is not expensive.”

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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Desperate Living Conditions in Rebel-...
Jobar
By abdalmanamissa
26 Feb 2015

Jobar, Syria
February 26, 2015

The Damascus suburb of Jobar has been transformed into a devastated ghost town after more than more than two years of heavy battles between government and opposition fighters have failed to bring decisive victory to either side.

The very few civilians who remain in the neighborhood gather broken doors and furniture from wrecked homes to provide firewood.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

R-L pan of destroyed building
Traveling of road
Traveling of tunnel
Traveling of three children amid destruction
Various traveling of streets
Various of man chipping wood
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of two women walking amide destroyed buildings
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of destroyed building
Wide/ zoom in of two children carrying wood
Various of men sitting around a fire
Wide of fighters
Close-up of axe chopping wood
Wide/ zoom out of men carrying large bags

04:00 – 04:47

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, a fighter in Jobar Neighborhood

“As you can see, there are no civilians. There is no firewood nor any other means of heating. There is no electricity or diesel. All of this disappeared a long time ago. [NAT Sound: Heavy gunshot]. People come under shelling and shooting as they gather firewood. They take wood from wrecked houses and cut down trees – anything that can be used to provide heating because there is no diesel. People of all ages are doing what it takes to manage. They come all the way from over there. God, not us, is protecting them. They gather some firewood and then leave. The situation is extremely tragic. It is more difficult for civilians than it is for us.“

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed fighter in Jobar Neighborhood
04:48 – 05:36

“As you can see, dear brother, the situation is deplorable. People suffer from the lack of fuel and other basic necessities needed for heating and cooking. People are using wood from homes, which, as you can see, have been bombed, especially in Jobar. There are many destroyed homes. In general, Jobar has entirely been destroyed. People use any available wood from doors, window shutters and furniture. Everything is ruined and people go out to gather wood to provide heating for their children and prepare food. People undergo a lot of risk while doing this, under shelling from rockets and from warplanes.”

Wide of smoke rising as a result of bombing

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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Lebanese Snowstorm Adds to Misery of ...
Aarsal
By TTM Contributor 32
19 Feb 2015

Set largely against a bleak grey sky, this video sheds light on the rough conditions in which many are forced to spend the winter months in Ersal, a northern Lebanese town with a large population of Syrian refugees that's long since been troubled with spillover from the civil war next door. The scene of major clashes between the Lebanese government and Al-Nusra/ISIS in August 2014, the video reveals the town's struggles to cope with harsh winter conditions such as strong wind and snow storms.

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"

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Living Conditions “Extremely Bad” in ...
Jarabulus
By TTM Contributor 34
13 Feb 2015

Jarabulus, Syria
February 13, 2015

This video offers a rare glimpse of daily life in Jarabulus, an ISIS-controlled Syrian town on the border with Turkey, located around 120 km northwest of Aleppo.
Video contains interviews with two anonymous residents who complained about their economic conditions, saying that basic commodities are unaffordable while there are few employment opportunities.

The footage, which was shot secretly, shows what is believed to be ISIS headquarters destroyed by international coalition-led airstrikes. It also shows local residents in markets and agriculture fields inside and near Jarabulus.

Fighters from the Nusra Front, considered the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, took over the town in 2013 and later pledged allegiance to ISIS. More than 200,000 Kurds and Arabs in Jarabulus and the surrounding villages have lived under ISIS since early 2014.

The name of the contributor has been withheld for security reasons.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Traveling of fields/ road sign “Jarablus”
Wide of destroyed bridge on river
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of destroyed buildings
Wide of ISIS religious teachings
Traveling of street
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of official printed announcements by ISIS posted outside a building/ close up of seal “The Islamic State, Department of Agriculture, Jarabulus District”
L-R pan of field
Wide of children sliding down a hill
Various of boat rowing in the Euphrates River
Wide of planted vegetables
Wide/ L-R pan of orchard
Various of sheep grazing
Close-up of a person cutting firewood
Various of woman cooking using a stove
Various of a woman milking a cow
Various of oil containers for sale on the roadside
Medium of man at fish market
Various of vegetables for sale at market
Wide of field and sheep herd
Traveling of people in an outdoor market
Various of clothes and shoes for sale
Various of spices for sale
Various of market
Various of crowd at market
Various of food items for sale
Wide/ traveling inside health center

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
09:54 – 12:16

“The situation is not good. I cannot say that we are comfortable. Our situation is very bad. A diesel barrel costs 20,000 [Syrian pounds]. How can we afford it? A gas canister costs 4,000 [Syrian pounds] and a liter of kerosene costs 225 pounds. A pack of bread costs 130 pounds. How can we afford this? I have two young men who are unemployed. Where can they go? “The [Islamic] State is good. They have caught the debauched and the thieves who have hurt people, but they provide electricity and water for only two hours [a day]. For more than a year, people have barely seen electricity. It is provided during two hours but the grid is overloaded and the current is interrupted after half an hour. The bakery was not functioning; they repaired it but bread is expensive. We cannot afford it. I bake bread myself.

“As for warplanes… Our houses have been fractured. These countries have formed a coalition against us. We live in a border town. Bombing goes on night and day.

“They should have bombed the tyrant who has deprived us of everything. He has ruined everything. Whenever our children went out to look for work they were accused of being criminals and caught. All our young men have been put in jail. What can we do? The situation is bad.

“We use firewood. We had olive trees but we cut them down and burned them in the stove to have heat in this cold weather.

“I have a cow. Animal feed is expensive. A kilogram of hay costs 50 pounds. A bale of barely that contains 40 kg costs 2,700 pounds. We need this cow to feed us. All the people who have cattle suffer the same crisis that we do. It is not only me; all of us suffer a bad situation. We wish that we die. There is not a single house that has not been fractured due to warplanes.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
12:17 – 13: 19

“Conditions under the Islamic State are extremely bad. Under the Islamic State, a barrel of diesel costs more than $100. A ton of firewood costs 22,000 [pounds]. This crisis has never been witnessed before.

“Nothing has improved under the Islamic State. Everything has deteriorated. They should create employment for the people. The people work in agricultural lands, which do not provide any revenue. We have abandoned our land. Not all the plots are being cultivated. People have cut down olive groves and used them as firewood. The situation is extremely miserable. There are no services and foreign countries are not providing aid. The Islamic State is in control of the situation. Turkey has closed the border and aid cannot reach people. The situation is very bad under the Islamic State.”

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Yemenis Block-off Main Roads and Burn...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
30 Jul 2014

July 30, 2014
Sana'a, Yemen

Hundreds of Yemenis blocked off main roads and burned tires, in a number of Yemeni provinces, in protest against the latest price-hike of petroleum products, which came into effect on the third day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

On Wednesday morning the prices of fuel had increased from 2,500 to 4,000 Yemeni riyals ($11.6 to $18.6) for 20 liters. The price of diesel also increased from 2000 to 3,900 riyals.
Yemen is considered to be the poorest country in the Middle East with nearly half of its population living in severe poverty.

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Alternative Electricity in Aleppo
شارع السليمانية, حي السليمانيه, Aleppo, Mount Simeon, Aleppo Governorate, Syria
By Mhammad Darwish
01 Nov 2013

Aleppo, Syria
November 2013

As a result of a power shortage, residents of rebel-held parts of Aleppo have resorted to buying electricity from local providers, who operate large generators. Video includes an interview with a generator owner, shots of generators and makeshift electric grids, as well as general scenes from the streets of Aleppo.

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Bitter Oranges - African Migrant Work...
Rosarno, Italy
By Carolincik
29 Jul 2013

The living conditions of the African migrant workers are horrendous. During the winter months, when thousands arrive in the hope to find work, slum cities develop. The conditions in the squalid camps are similar to those in war zones one of the rare doctors who visit the slums tells us. In many of the makeshift camps there is no running water or electricity. Some of the camps are controlled by the mafia, and people are forced to pay for services they often never receive.

View the full collection here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1314

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Bitter Oranges - African Migrant Work...
Rosarno, Italy
By Carolincik
29 Jul 2013

Rosarno is sporadically in the media during the winter months when the orange harvest takes place. However, many migrant workers stay all year round in Rosarno and during the long, hot summer months not much work is available. Quite a few people have no other choice than to stay because they have not enough money to travel elsewhere in Italy to find seasonal work.

Finding enough to eat becomes the main occupation of those who stay behind. The blue tents, erected by the city council are too hot to even sleep in during the night. During the day, temperatures in these tents can go up to 50 degrees celsius.

A young man from Nigeria, who has been in Rosarno for a couple of years tells us that he wants to go home to his family. The situation at home would never become as worse as it is in Southern Italy. With no papers and no money, however, even going home becomes impossible. Even if he could go home, he would be too ashamed to tell his family that he has no money saved up after all these years. They would never believe me what I lived through in Europe he tells us.

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Italy under eviction
Milan, Italy
By Alice Sassu
14 Jul 2013

The rent of the Mauhay family's house amounted to 550 euro for month.

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Italy under eviction
Milan, Italy
By Alice Sassu
14 Jun 2013

Arnold, his wife Mardy and their sons Adrian, Alessa and Angel Mauhay used to live in a 35 sq.m. two-room apartment.

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Asian Families Face Evictions In Italy
Milan, Italy
By U.S. Editor
14 Jun 2013

Technically, it's called “arrearage innocent”: indicating people will be evicted because with their scarce income they are unable to pay the rent.
The families with many members are the most vulnerable; families of up to 6 often live in a 40 square meter apartments with little or no means to apply to public housing to relocate.
While social emergency demands increase rapidly, just in the city of Milan 5.000 public houses remain empty, waiting to be surveyed and put in condition to be inhabited.

The Mauhay family is from Philippines. Arnold, Mardy and their children Adrian, Alessa and Angel, were living in a house in the north of Milan. The building was very badly maintained, the stairs had no lights and the dangerous electric wiring affected their house. After their eviction they are living in a hotel with the support of the municipality.

Kumara and Mary are from Sri Lanka. They, as many others, are victims of the illegal rent black market. As they are undocumented migrants it is impossible for them to register without permits for a housing contract. When they tried to ask the owner to give them a proper lease, he increased the rent. They were unable to pay and soon after received an eviction notification. Now Kumara is living in his car, and Mary is hosted in protection housing with their son, Nathaka.

During the realization of this project I've built a close relationship with several families. In the beginning I tried to follow their stories from the notification to the eviction, but when the police and the legal officer avoid me to take photos during these moments, I had to focus my attention on other aspects of their stories, like details that could reveal the dramatic experience they were experiencing. After the eviction, in fact, some families went to hosting structures, another part moved to hotels with the support of the municipality, while many others had no other choice but to sleep on the streets while they wait for a public social house, to which they are entitled.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Abdallah regularly goes to a friend’s place to sleep in a "Banga", a makeshift shelter.

Abdallah se rend régulièrement chez un ami pour dormir dans un "Banga", un abri de fortune, qu’ils partagent souvent à plusieurs.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

When they have the means, Abdallah and his friends get drunk on cheap wine.

Quand ils en ont les moyens, Abdallah et ses copains se saoulent de mauvais vin.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

After a fire in the Kawéni slum.

Après un incendie dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Kayoum, 16, French of Comorian origin, lives in the Kawéni slum. He’s Djof’s best friend.

Kayoum, 16 ans, Français d'origine Comorienne, vie dans le bidonville de Kawéni. Il est le meilleur ami de Djof.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Abdallah has to leave his shantytown in order to find water for a shower.

Pour se laver, Abdallah doit quitter le bidonville afin de bénéficier d'eau pour se laver.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Djof, 17 (center). He arrived to Mayotte at the age of 10 after leaving the Comoros Islands, his native country, after an accident. He lives ever since in the Kawéni slum, without his parents.

Djof (au centre) a 17 ans. Il est arrivé à Mayotte à l'âge de 10 ans après avoir quitté les Comores, son pays d'origine, suite à un accident. Il vit depuis sans ses parents dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Abdallah, 17 (center). He was born in Mayotte to a Comorian mother who’s an illegal immigrant. She was sent back when Abdallah was barely 10 years old. He lives alone ever since in the Kawéni slum.

Abdallah (au centre) a 17 ans. Il est né à Mayotte d'une mère Comorienne en situation irrégulière. Elle a été expulsée alors qu'il avait à peine 10 ans. Il vit depuis, seul, dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Upon his arrival to Mayotte, Djof found shelter at a cousin’s place. He still goes back for consultation and to acquire his administrative documents.

A son arrivée à Mayotte, Djof a été hébergé chez une cousine. Il s’y rend encore pour consulter ou récupérer ses documents administratifs.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

In the Kawéni slum, Djof and his friends are preparing the traditional "voulé", Mahorese (Mahorais) barbecue.

Djof et ses amis préparent le traditionnel "voulé", barbecue mahorais, dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Djof uses a hardly sterilized needle and Chinese ink to tattoo his friends.

Une aiguille à peine stérilisée et de l’encre de Chine servent à Djof pour tatouer ses amis.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Entry of a graveyard occupied by a refugee family on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. It has been one year since hundreds of displaced people have taken shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes. The young Ahmad is complaining about the very hard living conditions of his daily life. There is no running water and electricity. « When it is raining we have to go out of the graveyard because it is full of water ».

Entrée d'un tombeau occupé par une famille réfugiée sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord-ouest du pays. Eloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne. Le petit Ahmad se plaint des conditions de vie déplorables dans lesquelles ils vivent. Ils ne disposent ni d'eau courante, ni d’électricité.
« Quand il pleut trop, nous sommes obligés de sortir car le tombeau se remplit d'eau ».

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

The refugees have put some tarp at the entry of the graveyard where they live on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. Living conditions are extremely hard when the rain seeps into the graveyard. It has been one year that hundreds of displaced people are taking shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes.
Les réfugiés ont installé des bâches à l'entrée du tombeau où ils vivent dans sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Les conditions de vie sont extrêmement dures quand l'eau de pluie s'infiltre dans la tombe. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord ouest du pays. Éloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Hygiene is very bad on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. They fled the air strikes without being able to bring their personal belongings.

Les conditions d'hygiène des populations déplacées dans le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb sont déplorables. Ils ont fui les bombardements sans pouvoir emporter leurs affaires personnelles.

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
11 Apr 2013

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

A child rides his bike in Gadaffi's compound

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

A broken table believed to have belonged to Ghaddafi. It was found inside the underground maze of tunnels in the compound.