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Namibia housing crisis 7
Rehoboth , Namibia
By Karel Prinsloo
31 Dec 2012

Washing and a car stand next to a corrugated iron shack , 19 Dec 2013 in Rehoboth ,Namibia. Namibia with a population of around 2 million, ranked fourth in 2012 for the biggest housing price increases in the world. Prices have dropped slightly in 2013 but are double what they were six years ago, putting it beyond the reach of most Namibians. More and more people are forced to live in corrugated iron shacks dotted around most big towns and the capital Windhoek. Photo/ Karel Prinsloo

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Namibia housing crisis 6
Rehoboth , Namibia
By Karel Prinsloo
31 Dec 2012

Widower Melanie Januarie and her children stand in front of her corrugated iron shack, 17 Dec 2013 in Rehoboth , Namibia.Namibia, with a population of around 2 million, ranked fourth in 2012 for the biggest housing price increases in the world. Prices have dropped slightly in 2013 but are double what they were six years ago, putting it beyond the reach of most Namibians. More and more people are forced to live in corrugated iron shacks dotted around most big towns and the capital Windhoek. Photo/ Karel Prinsloo

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Namibia housing crisis 5
Rehoboth , Namibia
By Karel Prinsloo
31 Dec 2012

Gunther Philander hold a goat in front of his grandfathers shack , 11 Dec 2013 just outside Rehoboth , Namibia. Gunther life with his granddad as his parents are working in a city a few hundred kilometres away.Namibia, with a population of around 2 million, ranked fourth in 2012 for the biggest housing price increases in the world. Prices have dropped slightly in 2013 but are double what they were six years ago, putting it beyond the reach of most Namibians. More and more people are forced to live in corrugated iron shacks dotted around most big towns and the capital Windhoek. Photo/ Karel Prinsloo

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Namibia housing crisis 4
Rehoboth , Namibia
By Karel Prinsloo
31 Dec 2012

Show Cloete text a friend inside her parents corrugated iron shack, 19 Dec 2013 in Rehoboth , Namibia.Namibia, with a population of around 2 million, ranked fourth in 2012 for the biggest housing price increases in the world. Prices have dropped slightly in 2013 but are double what they were six years ago, putting it beyond the reach of most Namibians. More and more people are forced to live in corrugated iron shacks dotted around most big towns and the capital Windhoek. Photo/ Karel Prinsloo

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Namibia housing crisis 3
Rehoboth , Namibia
By Karel Prinsloo
31 Dec 2012

Elzette Kisting sit in front of her parents corrugated iron shack ,18 Dec 2013 in Rehoboth , Namibia.Namibia, with a population of around 2 million, ranked fourth in 2012 for the biggest housing price increases in the world. Prices have dropped slightly in 2013 but are double what they were six years ago, putting it beyond the reach of most Namibians. More and more people are forced to live in corrugated iron shacks dotted around most big towns and the capital Windhoek. Photo/ Karel Prinsloo

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Namibia housing crisis 2
Rehoboth , Namibia
By Karel Prinsloo
31 Dec 2012

Tercuis Lewanschk pose on his motorbike in front of his corrugated iron shack , 20 Dec 2013 in Rehoboth , Namibia. Namibia, with a population of around 2 million, ranked fourth in 2012 for the biggest housing price increases in the world. Prices have dropped slightly in 2013 but are double what they were six years ago, putting it beyond the reach of most Namibians. More and more people are forced to live in corrugated iron shacks dotted around most big towns and the capital Windhoek. Photo/ Karel Prinsloo

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GROWING NUMBER OF YEMENI CHILDREN ADD...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By Editor's Picks
12 Dec 2012

In Yemen, Qat addictions have grown to epidemic proportions among children and young adults. The drug induces a similar high as that of caffeine, and can be highly addictive. The problem is such that many children stop going to school, instead choosing to stay home to chew the bitter plant with friends, or addicted family members. Officials are concerned about the growing problem, an fear that the plant is creating a generation of illiterate children.

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Laolu Sebanjo Afromysterics Art
Abuja, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
01 Dec 2012

Name: Afromystrerics Art.

Journalist: Taiwo Adeleke

CUE:
A Nigerian born Artist and musician use his works of art to interpret the mystery of the African thought pattern and the weak economics situation in Nigeria from the fuel scarcity, crisis and killings , political power tussle and the challenges of Africa Artist at large. Images and soundbite of people at the art exhibition.

Headline:
Artist use his work of art to interpret the Economic situation in Nigeria and Africa at Large.

SLUG:
RAW-NIGERIA-ART

SYNTHE:
Timi Inekoba (Woman) Participant at the Exhibition
Stanley Ibansu (man) Business man Participant at the Art Exhibition
Laolu Senbanjo (man) Artist / Musician

SHOTLIST:

ABUJA, NIGERIA, NOVEMBER 30, 2012, AT THE ART EXHIBITION
ABUJA NIGERIA, DECEMBER 02, 2012 AT THE MUSIC CONCERT

VAR of a Artist drawing
VAR of Artist art exhibition in Abuja
VAR of people registering at the Art exhibition
VAR of Artist show casing his Art work to Audience
VAR of Artist playing is Guitar and singing to the audience
VAR of Artist Playing his music alone in the garden.
VAR of Artist at his music Concert in Abuja at the city park Abuja Nigeria

SOUNBITE:1 Timi Inekoba (Woman). Participant at the Art Exhibition ( English, 00:00:07:24 ). "My second favorite pieces is about the visual cycle, all the random things that as been going on in Nigeria, the subsidy things, the oil thing, the corruption thing is like he just recycle everything. Am pretty sure you know its art and music it comes together, so he translate everything from art to music , music to art. I think this will stand any were and its good. i like his art because its abstract, its beautiful, its something else,but i think it we go very far".

SOUNDBITE 2 : Stanley Ibansu (man) Business man Participant at the Art Exhibition. (00:00:51:17) "A picture speaks volume. i mean in thousand words , now pictures is in millions of words his art speaks millions of words , its mind blowing , i love what he does, most of what he as done envoy round the women fold , and all this while, why the event was going on i was thinking about why the women but you know discover that its actually the women its a woman world,everything involve around the woman , he has been able to, i had something very peculiar today somebody said that if you are able to change the woman, 80% of the challenges we have in the society is handle and that is the truth. What he is doing is affecting the women fold and i must tell you this is cutting across the change we expect and to tell you the truth he is making the impact that is needed with that ".

SOUNDBITE 3: Laolu Senbanjo (man) Artist / Musician. ( 00:00:47:08)
"My name is Laolu Senbanjo and am an artist and also a musician, my style of art is called Afromysterics art which simply means the mystery of Africa thought pattern, and what i do is hat i like to use my art to interpret different scenario and situations. I draw inspiration from methodology, symbols, Africa life, the Africa third pattern, everyday life and you know what we do is a narrative of a busy mind. An African mind is very busy is thinking of many things at the same time, so with this i try to tell you a lot of stories with just one picture, i take you through a story in a particular painting.

After having exhibitions outside the shore of Nigeria, i have been to few exhibitions am in a position to compare and contrast what the acceptance is like, you know you cant compare the monetary value in terms of appreciation in terms of the value of the artist itself. We in Africa, we need to do more , we need to value our artist and treat therm better because its sad to know that a lot of artist don't even have art galleries.

the major challenges is that of perceptive and understanding of what art is and a lot of people, like i tell people you don't pay an artist for his labour, he is not a laborer, you pay an artist for his site and ability to see what you cant see and put it in imagination on canvas ability to connect what is in your mind to your art. That is what people should value and that is priceless in the sense that when you see a work of art you see people price it like its a commodity like tomatoes and its very heart breaking sometimes the way we treat our own artist and this is something that is absence somewhere like i had exhibition in Germany , the artist are treated with respect and dignity and you know what ever costs a work is the value behind the work , basically you cant price art.

Afromysterics is going on loud , we are launching out and what we want is to take the message of our people , we want to take it to the world in charcoal something that the world have not seen, we want to take it out in a very unique manner, there is notting fetish or demonic about africa art, we should stop demonizing our history , our root because that is what saddens me the most , because most people see carving, mask , they start saying its as this and that , many people have been brain watched, and its painful , very very painful, i menthes are beautiful things that is been appreciated globally , this is what makes us unique, i mean while should be more European than an European, i mean he doesn't want to see the like of Michelangelo , Da vinci, of this world, i mean while not do what is natural to you , we have our styles of art , we have what cones to us naturally and the reasons while am doing this is that , this is what comes to me , this is what i feel, this is what i imagine and this is what am dreaming , i mean my art , i that is what am actually doing here i just sit down and let it flow that as been my life i let it flow."

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Esplin120711_2385.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
11 Jul 2012

The rate of ocean acidification is expected to accelerate in the near future. Since the industrial revolution, ocean acidification has increased by 30%. Scientists believe that this rate is faster than anything previously experienced over the last 55 million years.

The problem is that even a mild change in PH levels has significant impact on animals with calcium carbonate shells or skeletons. They literally dissolve. Affected animals include krill and plankton as well as coral. This means that the bottom of the food web could potentially become extinct, and in turn so could fish, according to Zoologist Kent Carpenter: "If corals themselves are at risk of extinction and do in fact go extinct, that will most probably lead to a cascade effect where we will lose thousands and thousands of other species that depend on coral reefs.”

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By Mark_Esplin
10 Jul 2012

A fisherman wades through the shallows carrying a handful of possessions after a mornings fishing trip.

Attempts to educate fishermen have been made by the environmental community, and attitudes are slowly changing. The Coral Triangle Initiative announced that it saw a decrease in the use of destructive fishing methods in 2012. Although, they stated that other threats such as Population increase, pollution and sedimentation have increased considerably.

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By Mark_Esplin
10 Jul 2012

A fisherman on Palawan Island in the Philippines prepares for a fishing voyage out to sea.

Scientists have predicted that by 2100, global temperature rise could result in the extinction of coral in the Coral Triangle. This would lead to an 80% reduction in regional food production.

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

Fishers tend to target bigger fish, which act as predators in the food web. Biologists have observed a change in the Philippines' species composition, and an increase of fishing for small oceanic fish – anchovies, etc. This is a good indication of overfishing, and of gradual stock collapse, as fishers can no longer catch larger fish to support themselves.

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

The Philippines Government admits that all targeted species in the Philippines are showing signs of overfishing. Officials also recognise that the current approach to fishing is unsustainable. “Overall, the harvest rate of Philippine fisheries is approximately 30 percent higher than the maximum sustainable yield, which will likely trigger stock collapses in the absence of increased management.” (Department of Environment and Natural Resources)

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

The majority of people within the Coral Triangle are living in poverty. This increases the social and economic importance of reefs, and reduces their ability to adapt to depleting fish supplies.

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

The threats to the Coral Triangle are numerous, and often vary from site to site. As such there is not a single answer to the problems faced by these ecosystems. Nevertheless, wide ranges of solutions are being adopted in an attempt to curb this degradation. These include: Marine Protected areas (MPA), gear restrictions, and catch regulations.

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

A decline in reef biodiversity does not only affect local communities and subsistence fishermen’s food security, though they are likely the hardest hit. According to the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), natural capital contributes significantly to manufacturing and service economies, that in-turn helps stabilise a nations food security. In their report ‘TEEB – The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for National and International Policy Makers’ the UNEP suggest one systemic cause for a lack of local will power to preserve natural resources. “Benefits depend on local stewardship, local knowledge and, in some cases, foregoing opportunities for economic development – yet people on the ground often receive little or no payment for the services they help to generate. This can make it more economically attractive to exploit the resource rather than preserve assets of global worth.”

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

Government figures state that 67% of animal protein in the Philippines is comprised of fish and fish products. This makes fish the nations most important food source, next to rice.

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

A fisherman prepares his line in a small wooden shack as his daughter plays behind. Surrounded by sublime tropical waters, the 7,000+ island shorelines of the Philippines are home to 40 million people - 45% of its population.

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

Hook and line fishing techniques are seen as a solution compared to large scale commercial methods like trawler nets, that are considered dramatically unsustainable. Commercial fishing is having a drastic impact on fish stocks around the globe. Populations of targeted species such as Bluefin Tuna and Cod have reduced 90% since the 1960s, according to professors at the University of British Columbia.

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Esplin120709_2349.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

Hook and line fishing techniques are seen as a solution compared to large scale commercial methods like trawler nets, that are considered dramatically unsustainable. Commercial fishing is having a drastic impact on fish stocks around the globe. Populations of targeted species such as Bluefin Tuna and Cod have reduced 90% since the 1960s, according to professors at the University of British Columbia.

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By Mark_Esplin
09 Jul 2012

It is not only coral reefs that are affected by global warming. Other important environments, such as mangrove forests and sea grass beds, which provide habitats for hundreds of thousands of fish species and other organisms, are also threatened. Further destruction and loss to these domains will have profound effects on the productivity of costal regions and the lives of people reliant on them.

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By Mark_Esplin
07 Jul 2012

According to the WWF, “The decreased productivity of coastal ecosystems will reduce the food resources and income available to coastal communities in the Coral Triangle. By 2050, coastal ecosystems will only be able to provide 50% of the fish protein that they do today, leading to increasing pressure on coastal agriculture and aquaculture.”

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By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

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By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

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By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

Tourist diving boats float above a reef in the North-East Philippines. Such tours can have a devastating impact on the health of reefs as participants inevitably kick or displace coral formations. The excess pollution caused by nearby hotels and resorts are an often unseen yet leading factor to the decline of a reefs health.

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Esplin120705_2380.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

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By Mark_Esplin
05 Jul 2012

The coral triangle is located in South East Asia and supports 120 million people, across 6 countries, over an area of 1.6 billion acres. Overfishing, pollution, overpopulation and climate change are putting this essential ecosystem in danger.

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By Mark_Esplin
04 Jul 2012

Government statistics suggest that in one year 1,370 tons of coral trout alone were exported, creating revenues of US$140 million. The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) disputes this figure; suggesting high incidences of illegal and unreported trafficking, significantly expand the official records. They go on to state relaxed trade agreements are one of the leading factors creating additional demand on the Philippines reefs resources.

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By Mark_Esplin
04 Jul 2012

Government statistics suggest that in one year 1,370 tons of coral trout alone were exported, creating revenues of US$140 million. The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) disputes this figure; suggesting high incidences of illegal and unreported trafficking, significantly expand the official records. They go on to state relaxed trade agreements are one of the leading factors creating additional demand on the Philippines reefs resources.

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By Mark_Esplin
04 Jul 2012

According to the Coral Triangle initiative, “The impacts of overfishing and to some extent destructive fishing practices on coral reefs are evident in the biomass of reef associated fish." It is reported that more than 50% of the reef sites in the Philippines assessed are overfished.

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By Mark_Esplin
23 Jun 2012

A fisherman farms abalone instead of heading out to sea to fish. Communities throughout the Philippines are being encouraged to seek alternative sources of income from fishing. According to the WWF, “The decreased productivity of coastal ecosystems will reduce the food resources and income available to coastal communities in the Coral Triangle. By 2050, coastal ecosystems will only be able to provide 50% of the fish protein that they do today, leading to increasing pressure on coastal agriculture and aquaculture.”

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By Mark_Esplin
22 Jun 2012

The cultivation of kelp and seaweed for pharmaceutical industries is being developed by some communities as an alternative source of income to prevent an over reliance of fishing for an income, thereby reducing the stress on local fish populations.

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By Mark_Esplin
20 Jun 2012

Children play in a harbour in the Southern Philippines. Scientists have predicted that by 2100, global temperature rise could result in the extinction of coral in the Coral Triangle. This would lead to an 80% reduction in regional food production.

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By Mark_Esplin
19 Jun 2012

A child helps sort the catch on a small fishing vessel in the Southern Philippines. With nine percent of the total global reef cover, its national waters provide significant annual fish yield. Increasingly, fish catch are being sold for export, with China and Hong Kong the primary destination.
There is a billion-dollar enterprise in the Asia-Pacific region for live reef food fish trade (LRRFFT). The Philippines is a significant contributor to this industry.

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By Mark_Esplin
18 Jun 2012

A Filipino fisherman wears a mask to protect against the sun as he spends the morning catching octopus from a small canoe. Though largely seen as being sustainable, subsistence fishermen with a hook and line can still have an impact on their local ecology. Jared Diamond, an ecological anthropologist, claims the common belief that indigenous people conserve their resources is wrong. He writes that historically when people encounter the limits of their resources, catastrophe results.