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The Ritual celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2010

Taranto-Italy- March April 01th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street.

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The Ritual celebrations of Taranto's ...
Taranto, South Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
28 Mar 2010

Taranto-Italy- March 28th, 2010- EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY
The most famous rites take place in Taranto, starting on Palm Sunday when local fraternal orders bid in an auction for the honour of carrying the statues of Christ in the Holy Friday procession. Beginning at midnight on the Holy Thursday, members of the fraternities dress in white robes, covering their faces with hoods with only two slits for their eyes, which render them unrecognizable. Following an ancient route through the town, the fraternities walk barefoot, carrying the heavy statues representing the Stations of the Cross until dawn. The Holy Week celebrations are perhaps the most important event to take place in Taranto. The rituals are similar to those in many cities across Spain, reflecting the long Spanish domination of southern Italy and are organised by confraternita, or brotherhoods, each one affiliated to a particular church in the city.
Holy Week starts on Palm Sunday when people exchange palm crosses, a symbol of peace and of Jesus arriving in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday is also the day in which the two main confraternità of Taranto meet: that of the ‘Addolorata’ from the church of San Domenico in the old town, and that of ‘Carmine’ from the church of Madonna del Carmine in the new town. These two groups auction off the places in the processions and decide who will carry the statues. Throughout the week that follows masses take place in each church.
The processions take place on Thursday and Good Friday. The picture shows a member of the Confraternita, walking in the old Taranto's street.