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Deforestation in Malawi
Lilongwe
By Nathalie Bertrams
07 Dec 2017

For the past year, Malawi’s department of forestry has been cooperating with the army in a desperate bid to stem the illegal logging that is depleting the country’s forests at a rate of 2.8% per year. Surging demand for charcoal in Malawi’s cities is the prime driver of deforestation here: around 54% of urban women now use this “black gold” for cooking, according to the government.

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Lilongwe
By Nathalie Bertrams
03 Feb 2017

Carrying a load of 150 kilos of charcoal on his bicycle, Handle Marino has been pedaling all through the night to reach Malawi's capital Lilongwe, where a wholesale buyer awaits the goods.

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The Amazonian Rain Forest: Farming an...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
20 Sep 2016

This collection highlights the deforestation of the Amazon due to cattle farming and corn farming. Various shots provide a look at the rain forest in its virgin state; workers felling trees to clear the land; a fire at night from slash and burn agriculture; a cattle ranch on cleared rain forest and a corn farm on cleared rain forest land. 

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Fire in the Amazonian Rain Forest (Sl...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain Forest using the slash and burn technique.

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Cattle Ranch in the Amazonian Rain Fo...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a cattle ranch in the Amazonian Rain Forest built on cleared Amazonian Rain Forest.

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Corn Farm in the Amazonian Rain Forest
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a corn farm featuring wide, sweeping vistas of corn and irrigation equipment in the Brazilian province of Minas Gerais. The corn farm was built on cleared rain forest land.

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Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain F...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of workers clearing and moving trees in the Amazonian Rain Forest using heavy equipment, bulldozers and front-loaders.

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Controversial Dam Project Threatens P...
Nahr Ibrahim
By Suzanne Baaklini
08 Feb 2015

Nahr Ibrahim, Lebanon
Febraury 9, 2015

The construction of a dam in the area of Janna, Lebanon, is causing wide controversy among local residents, ecologists and even certain politicians.
Janna, whose name means ‘paradise’ in Arabic, is a picturesque valley near Ibrahim River in north Lebanon, which hosts a rare ecosystem according to ecologists. Concerned Lebanese fear that this project will ruin the natural site without succeeding in retaining water. Geologist Samir Zaatiti warns that the surface on which the dam is being built covers large pits that absorb water.
There are also fears that the project might threaten the water source that feeds the Jeita Grotto, a submerged cave known as a tourist destination.
Preparations for the construction have started and many trees in the areas have been cleared.
Despite its rich water resources, Lebanon has struggled with a water distribution crisis due to the lack of adequate infrastructure.

The full version of the story is available here: https://www.transterramedia.com/media/56852

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Dr. Samir Zaatiti, Hydrologist:
0:17- 0:33
“My professor Michel Bakrovich, the president of the French Hydrologists Association, AHF, believes that this dam will be a like a sieve. He said that it will be dangerous. There is a high risk that earthquakes could occur under the dam.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Jean Abi Akar, Local Resident
00:42 – 00:57
“We have lived in this area since 1820. Our grandparents and fathers’ bones are here, as well as their sweat and blood. Nobody was able to preserve this land. The monks were not able to preserve this land and did not allow us to preserve it either. We were gradually displaced.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Raja Noujaim, Archaeologist and member of the Association to Protect Lebanon’s Heritage
00:58 – 01:33
“The study we have conducted is very clear; this dam will not retain water because the surface at its bottom does not allow it. There are wells that can cover the need for water in the entire Byblos area. However, they [the government] are not interested in doing small projects like these. They want to do big projects to boast about them. Of course, corruption is involved. “More than 300,000 trees and shrubs in this area will be cut down. I dare any expert to come and say that this operation does not have a negative influence. I dare any expert to say that this dam is being built to serve agriculture.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Joelle Barakat, Activist at the Association for the Protection of Jabal Moussa

01:48 – 02:12
“Many inhabitants of the area are farmers, so this river is vital for them. The local inhabitants are the only people who will suffer because of this project. Their natural environment will be ruined; they will no longer benefit from the valley as a touristic site. All of this is being done so that water which is not clean can reach Beirut; water that needs to be purified.”

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Tree Planting in Western Canada
Alberta, Canada
By Luc Forsyth
19 Aug 2014

Tree planters sleep on the ground, work in the rain and snow, battle swarms of insects, and bend over thousands of times a day – all in the pursuit of money. Tree planting is part adventure and part iconic right of passage. The ultimate goal is to earn as much as possible before the season ends. While some “rookie” planters might struggle to earn enough to cover their expenses, a motivated and experienced planter can expect to earn upwards of $300 every day. The very best earn even more still. Many tree planters return to this job year after year in pursuit of a large payout, whether for tuition, travel, or investment.

Carrying all their equipment on their backs, and heavy loads of tree seedings makes tree planting a physically exhausting experience. In a national study, it was determined that a tree planter can burn up to 8000 calories in a single day of work.

Known nationally as one of the hardest jobs a young person can do, this story follows a camp of 42 tree planters over a difficult four month season in northern Alberta.

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A village’s struggle to preserve its ...
Long La
By Corentin Fohlen
28 Mar 2014

Forests are the heart of Long La's development. In a country ravaged by deforestation, this village of 500 inhabitants has become a model of sustainable development. With the help of Speri, a vietnamese NGO, Long La has found a way to preserve its forest thanks to agroecology.

The forest is rich in medicinal plants and rare species and generates wealth for the community. Prior to 2004, it was threatened by timber exploitation. But its inhabitants soon realized that the water shortages they were facing were not normal and that the air was drier than it should have been in this tropical region.

It did not take long before they began to blame deforestation, which also adversely affects agricultural production. Today, forests cover 40% of the territory of Laos, whereas they made up 70% in the 1950s. In order to protect their forest, villagers in Long La reserved certain areas for the production of timber and others for medicinal plants. In some areas, it is now strictly forbidden to gather wood. They also enacted strict rules to preserve the forest, such as keeping farm animals in paddocks to prevent them from damaging trees.

In 2005, the Laotian government recognized Long La inhabitants' know-how and put them in charge of managing the village's forest. Doing so came naturally to the inhabitants since they all belong to the Hmong community, an animist ethnic group that considers the forest sacred. In Long La, the forest is even believed to host a venerated spirit: the Patongxenh.

Deforestation is being driven by corruption as well as poorly managed industrial-scale plantations for things like rubber. Yet Long La's management of the forest has proven that preservation can lead to development and wealth. Thanks to the forest, the village now cultivates Zong Zwa, a plant with bright yellow flowers that tastes similar to rocca. The village also produces 12 tons of organic vegetables each year which they sell to hotels and restaurants in Luang Prabang. Speri now works with 12 other villages to implement Long La's model. In 2012, the NGO and the villagers created a rural school to train local residents in agroecology.

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Laos deforestation 30
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
13 Mar 2014

Bia Twa Giang, 59, is one of the 16 healers of Long La. He is posing at the entrance of the preserved areas where medicinal plants grow. The forest is home to more than 250 species of medicinal plants.

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Laos deforestation 10
Yang
By Corentin Fohlen
13 Mar 2014

Yang, Laos. february 2014. A woman and her child in the village of Yang.

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Laos deforestation 24
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
13 Mar 2014

Bia Twa Giang, 59, is one of the 16 healers of Long La. Here poses in the preserved area where medicinal plants grow.

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Laos deforestation 9
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Luang Prabang, Laos. february 2014. The Ban Phong Van wood sawmill near Luang Prabang.

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Laos deforestation 25
Luang Prabang
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

The Ban Phong Van wood sawmill near Luang Prabang.

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Laos deforestation 11
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014.
Zong Zwa for sale at Long La's market.

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Laos deforestation 17
Donemai
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Donemai, Laos. february 2014. The Donemai market where the vegetables from Long La are sold

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Laos deforestation 2
Donemai
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Donemai, Laos. fevruary 2014. At the Donemai market, the demand for organic vegetables is high. The Zong Zwa is one of the most popular crop on markets.

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Laos deforestation 1
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. Fevruary 2014. Nen Lu Giang just bought Zong Zwa flowers at Long La to resell them at the market.

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Laos deforestation 20
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. fevrier 2014. Bia Twa Giang, 59, one of the 16 healers of Long Lan, poses in the protected area where medicinal plants grow. The forest is home to more than 250 species of medicinal plants.

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Laos deforestation 14
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014. Sai Ly, 33, is cutting down a teak tree

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Laos deforestation 8
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014. A woman harvesting Zong Zwa with her child.

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Laos deforestation 3
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014. Hevea crops, the major commercial source of natural rubber latex used, near Long La. In the northern parts of Laos,
Chinese companies are implementing rubber planting projects, leading to deforestation and the drying of the soil.

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Laos deforestation 12
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
19 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014.
Not far from the village of Long La, the Giang family is burning a field to prepare it for the cultibation of Hevea.

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Laos deforestation 7
Yang
By Corentin Fohlen
18 Feb 2014

Yang, Laos. february 2014.
Under the pressure of foreign companies investing in Laos, mainly Chinese, some peasants grow new crops which are often not adapted to the local environment. Munma, 36, poses in his field of "star beans", a crop that is in high demand in China.

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Laos deforestation 26
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Healers from all over the country discuss among the medicinal plants at the training centre of Long La. The centre was created in 2012 by the villagers and Speri to teach agroecology.

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Laos deforestation 5
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014.

On Chit works for the NGO Speri. She helps at the Peasants School, a training centre in Long La that teaches agroecology. She poses on the wooden structure of the next students house, facing the sacred forest.

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Laos deforestation 13
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014. Sprouts of Zong Zwa

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Laos deforestation 19
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014. A boy coming back from the harvest.

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Laos deforestation 7
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

© Corentin Fohlen/ DIvergence. Longlan, Laos. fevrier 2014. Recolte de la plante Zong Zwa

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Laos deforestation 4
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. February 2014.

Jong Gia Giang and Na Mo Tho pose in front of their house. They converted to Zong Zwa farming, the yellow gold of the village. They also grow suzu, a vegetable that looks like an eggplant. The money they earned allowed them to send their son Luang Prabang to university and pay for their 11 children's tuition fees.

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Laos deforestation 22
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014. Women harvesting Zong Zwa

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Laos deforestation 6
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014. At Long La's market, people come to buy Zong Zwa in order to resell it in Luang Prabang's markets.

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Laos deforestation 29
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

At the market of Long La where the harvests are sold.

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Laos deforestation 16
Longlan
By Corentin Fohlen
17 Feb 2014

Longlan, Laos. february 2014.
Burnt fields to where Hevea trees will be cultivated.