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Cane land Iran
Haft Tape
By Javid Tafazoli
09 Nov 2014

Little is known about sugar cane harvesting in southwestern Iran. Here the workers come with hopes of a better life but arrive to find extremely harsh working conditions. The work is hazardous and injuries are frequent, but there is no support system for the workers. They are in a system which abuses their need to earn a living and there is no thought on the safety of workers. They are under constant surveillance as they work 12 hour days, six days per week for which they get paid $10 per day. Most of them are from the western regions of Ilam and Lorestan and are contracted by organizations hired by plantation owners in their home towns. The season starts before spring arrives and does not finish until autumn. First they burn the fields, to make harvesting easier, before using sharp scythes to cut the canes.

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"Solidarity for All" Aids Immigrant W...
Nea Manolada, Elis, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
19 Jul 2014

Immigrants, most of them from Bangladesh, work as strawberry pickers in the fields of Nea Manolada, one of the main areas of strawberry cultivation in Greece. The working and living conditions are shocking. They are forced to work from dusk till dawn, with little or no money and no health care and insurance. More than 20 people live together in structures made of plastic sheets; they lack even basic sanitation and have only a hose for running water.

On Sunday 20 July, 2014 the organization "Solidarity for All" organized a visit to their camp in order to supply food and medicine and do health checks and provide aid where needed.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery
Savar, Bangladesh
By Karim Mostafa
15 Mar 2014

One year ago, on April 24 2013, the Rana Plaza, an eight-story commercial building, collapsed in Savar, a sub-district of Dhaka, Bangladesh. The building hosted clothing factories, a bank, apartments, and several other shops. 1,129 people died and approximately 2,515 people were injured. The incident was the deadliest ever in the history of the Bangladesh garment industry.

Today, injured survivors are learning to live again despite physical injuries, including amputated limbs, and psychological trauma. This story looks into the victims’ lives one year after the tragedy; from the ongoing work of the garment factories to the only physiotherapy clinic in Bangladesh, where some of the lucky survivors are receiving treatment.

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Nigeria Oil Theft (19 of 25)
Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
18 May 2013

Tula Ebiowei, 50, and his colleague work along the Nun River in Nigeria's oil-rich state of Bayelsa.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
01 May 2013

Workers in Lahore, Pakistan, observe International Labor Day. Workers in Pakistan face dangerous working conditions, often supporting their families on a dollar a day.

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Bricks of Bangladesh (15 of 24)
Faridpur, Bangladesh
By Karim Mostafa
27 Jan 2013

Women often do monotonous work and suffer from illnesses related to bad working conditions. One specific problem is diseases in the reproductive organs, which are caused by long hours spent squatting in the same position. Faridpur, Bangladesh. January 2013.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 25
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 3
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 8
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 5
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps) smokes cigarettes during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 4
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps) prepares a shot of an alcoholic drink during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 12
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
19 Jan 2013

Pallaqueras (women who select stones from the mine dumps looking for remains of gold) are pictured at work in a mining area in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 13
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

"Pallaqueras" (women who select stones from the mine dumps) attend the afternoon briefing with their colleagues and the engineers of Corporación Minera Ananea in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 6
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) works in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 9
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a man who selects stones from the mine dumps) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

17 January 2013. La Rinconada: "Pallaqueras" (women who select stones from the mine dumps) eat and rest outside their huts during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.
La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there.
Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.
Photo by Albert González Farran.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 1
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) takes a rest outside her shelter in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 7
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) inspects some stones in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 26
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps) takes her selection back home at the end of the workday in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 17
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

Two "Pallaqueras" (women who select stones from the mine dumps) takes their selection back home at the end of the workday in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 14
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Jan 2013

A miner, on his way from work, crosses the main gate that connects the village with the goldmines, in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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Bricks of Bangladesh (22 of 24)
Bandarban, Bangladesh
By Karim Mostafa
08 Jan 2013

Conditions at the fields are tough. The brick-making generates a lot of dust, which affects everyone working at the site as well as people living nearby. Bricks are the most efficient and widely used building material and new brick buildings are erected across the country. Bandarban, Bangladesh. January 2013.

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Editor's Picks for 8 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
07 Sep 2012

Egypt Air aircrew suspended their strike, which started early on Friday, September 7, in a bid to have better working conditions including better insurance and an increase in staff numbers; the strike forced the company to suspend international flights for more than 12 hours.

Although a smoking ban in all closed public spaces went into force in Lebanon under new legislation that promises hefty fines for lawbreakers, some people still sit in cafes, smoking water pipes and cigarettes.

Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi met on Thursday, September 6, with Qatar Premier and Foreign Minister Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim at the Presidential Palace headquarters in Cairo, where they held talks over the bilateral relations between the two countries and methods of increasing Qatari investments in Egypt.

A number of assailants attacked the Egyptian Football Association (EFA) on Wednesday, September 5, storming it with flammables and stones, causing damage to the building and terrifying its employees.

Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi met on Thursday, September 6, with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, where they discussed the latest regional developments as well as various Palestinian issues.

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Made in Bangladesh (6 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Female workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (5 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Child labor in Bangladesh's garment industry. In a hot and dusty room kids package jeans for export.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (3 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young and sometimes underaged workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (10 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young kids in the streets of Dhaka working as delivery boys for sub suppliers in the garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (7 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Textile workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 11
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
29 Sep 2009

29 September 2009. Two miners drive stones wagons to the mine dumps in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.