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No Payroll in Gaza
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
16 Dec 2014

(01:00 -01:46)

(Man, Arabic)

Mohamad Tahoun

I am Mohamad Ahmed Abu Tahoun, I work in sanitation in al-Nasr children hospital. We have been on a strike for 8 days. And until now nothing is being said about the salaries.

As you can see our situation, nobody is helping us, if we find food we cook, if not we count of God. In our family, 3 men work in sanitation, and we have two handicaps to take care of. But we have not been paid for almost 4 months. Our situation is bad.

(02:09)

(Woman, Arabic)

Cherine tahoun

Interviewer: What is your name?

Cherine Tahoun: my name is cherine

Interviewer: what is your last name?

Cherine Tahoun: Tahoun

Interviewer: How old are you? 16, 26?

Cherine Tahoun: Yes

Interviewer: where did you learn embroidery?

Cherine Tahoun: at school

Interviewer: This is all your work? show us

(02:55-04:13)

(Woman, arabic)

Suzanne

I am Suzanne, Mohamad's wife, we are three sisters married to three brothers. My eldest sister got married to Rafi Abu Tahoun, and four years later, I married Mohamad, and then my youngest sister married Iyad, about two years ago.

We are technically living together now, we used to live separately, but now, and because of the situation, we had to live together.

With the salary of 700 shekel, we used to barely be able to manage, but now when we no longer receive the 700 shekel, our situation is terrible. let alone the fact that we have handicaps, we also have children in schools. They need allowances, books, stationary. It is a very hard position that we are in. I hope that when winter comes, things will be easier for us, I hate winter now, because of the cold and the leaking that happen into the house.

I graduated from the university in 2008, and until now, I did not get a job in any domain and i did not even receive an unemployment allowance. in god's will if I find a job, our situation will definitely improve.

(05:01-05:48)

(Man, Arabic)

Iyad Tahoun

My name is Iyad Ahmed Mohamad Abu Tahoun, I work in the sanitation company, and they have not been paying us for 4 months. My son needs medications every week. any we cannot pay, even the supermarket owner is not allowing us to take stuff and pay later. We had to take things from the pharmacy and the supermarket and promise to pay later, but our debt grew and the supermarket owner told me to pay my debt in order to keep giving us things.

The government in Gaza is blaming the government of the West Bank and the other way around.

I hope that the officials can find a solution to our problem. because we can no longer handle the situation.

(09:13-09:37)

(Man, Arabic)

Rafi Tahoun

She suffered from a stroke about two months ago, stayed in the hospital for a while and then we took her home, they improved for a while but recently her situation got worst. She cannot eat unless we use a syringe. Most of our stuff we get on the intention to pay later, or from people who offer help sometimes.

(09:39-09:59)

(Woman, Arabic)

We need lots of things,we need tissues, two boxes everyday, they cost 5 Shekel. and we need diapers every week, they cost 28 shekel, and there is no payment, no salaries, we get all of the things that we need, including food, with debt. The situation is difficult, as you can see.

(10:00-10:25)

(Man, Arabic)

Rafi Tahoun

The sanitation situation in the hospital is bad, there are volunteers, but it is not the same as when we used to work here . They collect the trash and that is it, they do not sanitize what needs to be sanitized.

(12:54-16:23)

(Man, Arabic)

Official

The sanitation workers used to be paid by the government formed by Hamas, but now since the government is one, it is al-Hamdallah government, and is responsible for Gaza and the West Bank, It is responsible for all the education, sanitation and all the other cases. We are not talking about a strike for government employees, we are talking about a strike for private companies employees. those employees work according to contracts were signed in the era of the government of Hamas, and now al-Hamdallah government should be responsible to pay for them.

The political issue between Hamas and Fateh should not be related to the responsibilities of the government. The government should be responsible in Gaza the same way it is responsible in the West Bank.

The government is not doing its duties even though al-Hamdallah visited Gaza, and there are 4 functioning minsters in Gaza, but it is not doing its duties, and that is why the citizens are stressed. The problem of health, unemployment and many others in gaza should be the responsibility of the government.

Hamas requested from the people to volunteer until the problem is solved.

There is no good reason for not paying the employees, employees in other sectors are being paid. the employees have the right to practice all kinds of pressuring methods in order to get their rights, and it has been 6 months of struggling without a solution for this problem.

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
09 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
08 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

Frame 0004
30,000 laborers march on Labor Day
Metro Manila, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
01 May 2013

Around 30,000 militant and labor groups march to Liwasang Bonifacio on May 1, 2013, Labor Day urging the government for salary increases of 125 pesos across the board nationwide.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
01 May 2013

Workers in Lahore, Pakistan, observe International Labor Day. Workers in Pakistan face dangerous working conditions, often supporting their families on a dollar a day.

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Made in Bangladesh (23 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (22 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (21 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (20 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (19 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (17 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (16 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (15 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (14 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (13 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (12 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (18 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
31 Mar 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Poor earnings of day labor
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
31 Dec 2012

Manual laborers in Bangladesh face harsh conditions, working 11 hours days, often for under $2 an hour. According to ILO (International Labor Organization), the harsh reality is that some 375 million working women and men are not able to earn enough to keep themselves and their families above the $1.25 a day extreme poverty line. That is around one in eight of the employed population of the developing world where more than a quarter of working women and men live with their families on $2 a day or less.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (3 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Marcos Andrés Armenteros con otros cuatro trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (4 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Marcos Andrés Armenteros con otros cuatro trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (5 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Cinco trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (6 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Medical review of the strikers
Revision medica de los huelgistas.
Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Cinco trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (7 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Marcos Andrés Armenteros con otros cuatro trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (8 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Cinco trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
15 Nov 2012

Firefighters extinguish a fire in a police car started during the riots.
Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Los Bomberos apagan el fuego de un coche de policia incendiado durante los disturbios.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Momento de los disturbios
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Disturbios durante la Jornada de Huelga.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Protest called for by the major unions.
Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Manifestacion convocada por los sidicatos mayoritarios.S eguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Leading Spain on strike.
Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Cabecera de la manifestación de la jornada de huelga.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Skirmishes in the center of Barcelona.
Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Disturbios por el centro de Barcelona.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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General Strike, Protests In Barcelona...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
14 Nov 2012

Shops were closed throughout the day in conjunction with a massive strike in Spain; the main economic sectors closed including transportation, trade and industry. Earlier in the morning picketers gathered in front of businesses.

Disturbios durante la manifestacion convocada Por entidades anarquistas.
Seguimiento masivo de la huelga General en España. Hoy los principales sectores economicos se han paralizado: el transporte, el comercio y la industria.
Por la mañana se han formado numerosos piquetes informativos delante de las empresas.

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Egyptians Address Morsi during Eid - ...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
27 Oct 2012

During the first Sacrifice Feast (Eid al-Adha) under the rule of President Mohamed Morsi, Egyptians send their president messages with various demands and issues that they wished would have been settled by the Eid.

The lack of security was the number one demand of Egyptians and the first wish they wanted Morsi to hear on this holy Muslim occasion.

Egyptians also address their new President to focus on the youth and work on providing them with housing and job opportunities, as unemployment in the country has exceeded 12%.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.”

A clean environment is also among the top demands of Egyptians.

President Morsi launched a two-day “Clean Homeland” campaign late July, during which workers, bulldozers, machines and officials could be seen everywhere nationwide. However, piles of garbage gradually returned to fill Egyptian streets.

Some Egyptians also demand retrial of those who killed peaceful protestors during the January 25 Revolution last year, complaining that most of the perpetrators have been acquitted.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.”

President Morsi promised that his first 100-day plan would put an end to five main problems in Egypt: lack of security, garbage in the streets, traffic jams and shortages of bread and fuel. However, monitoring activists say that Morsi achieved only 9.37% of the promises of his first 100 days.

In a previous speech, Morsi gave greater indication of the progress he made in the five major issues than what a lot of Egyptians actually feel.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 27, 2012 (and archive)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 27, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot of the main street in Tahrir Square
2. Long shot of some little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
3. Wide, pan right shot of streets around Tahrir Sq.
4. Long shot of some boys walking around in the square
5. Wide shot of the Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo
6. Medium shot of President Morsi during a press conference at the Presidential Palace (archive)
7. Close shot of a reporter taking notes during President Morsi’s speech (archive)
8. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
9. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” 10. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.” 11. Various, long shots of streets of Cairo
12. Wide shot of President Morsi heading to deliver a speech at the UN during the UN United Nations General Assembly meeting (archive)
13. Medium shot of President Morsi while giving the speech (archive)
14. Medium shot of the attendees during Morsi’s speech (archive)
15. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
16. Wide shot of Talaat Harb Square in downtown Cairo
17. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.” 18. Wide shot of a main street in down town Cairo
19. Long shot of little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
20. Various shots of the streets of Cairo
21. Medium shot of President Morsi during a speech to the nation, that was given in Cairo University (archive)
22. Long, pan right shot of President Morsi greeting the attendees of the meeting in Cairo University, after he finished his speech, and leaving the podium (archive)

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EGYPT PRESENTS DRAFT OF CONSTITUTION;...
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
10 Oct 2012

Egypt’s Constituent Assembly, the panel responsible for writing the country’s post-revolution constitution, released the first draft of the new constitution for debate and feedback by the public on Wednesday, October 10.

Hundreds of Lebanese teachers protested on Wednesday, October 10, outside the cabinet headquarters in Beirut, demanding that the government to implement a long-awaited salary increase.

On the first anniversary of the Maspero massacre, the relatives of the victims who were either shot or crushed to death by Armored Personnel Carriers, are still waiting for justice after a year of legal proceedings stemming from two cases, one of which witnessed the victims’ lawyers withdraw from the case and the other which saw protesters being put on trial.

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October 7th, World Day Demonstration ...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
07 Oct 2012

Barcelona, Spain. Thousands gathered to rally in the streets of Barcelona Sunday, October 7, 2012, to defend the right of everyone to have decent work. The call, made simultaneously across the state, also serves for unions gain momentum and set the stage for what could be a general strike throughout Europe.

Barcelona, Spain. Hoy domingo se han manifestado miles de personas por las calles de Barcelona para defender el derecho de todos a tener un trabajo digno. La convocatoria, que se ha hecho simultáneamente en las principales del Estado, también ha servido para que los sindicatos calienten motores y preparen el terreno por lo que podría ser una huelga general a nivel europeo.

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Editor's Picks for 8 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
07 Sep 2012

Egypt Air aircrew suspended their strike, which started early on Friday, September 7, in a bid to have better working conditions including better insurance and an increase in staff numbers; the strike forced the company to suspend international flights for more than 12 hours.

Although a smoking ban in all closed public spaces went into force in Lebanon under new legislation that promises hefty fines for lawbreakers, some people still sit in cafes, smoking water pipes and cigarettes.

Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi met on Thursday, September 6, with Qatar Premier and Foreign Minister Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim at the Presidential Palace headquarters in Cairo, where they held talks over the bilateral relations between the two countries and methods of increasing Qatari investments in Egypt.

A number of assailants attacked the Egyptian Football Association (EFA) on Wednesday, September 5, storming it with flammables and stones, causing damage to the building and terrifying its employees.

Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi met on Thursday, September 6, with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, where they discussed the latest regional developments as well as various Palestinian issues.

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Tunisian Youth attempt to Escape to I...
Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia
By jamel
14 Aug 2012

Tunisian Youth revolted on 12/17/2010 against the dictator ZINE EL ABIDINE BEN ALI and his
corrupt regime. Their slogan was: Jobs, freedom, dignity and the revolt begun in the poor forgotten
town Sidi Bouzid, after the 24 years old man Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire as a statement
against police repression.

The revolution succeeded as Ben ali left the country and escaped to Saudi Arabia.

3 transition governments succeed him and elections of a constitutional assembly took place on
October 23rd 2011.

The Islamic party ENNAHDHA won the elections and took power . They built a coalition
government with the 2 seculars parties ETTAKATOL and the CPR.

Tunisian people hope for reforms, prosperity and a better life.

But nothing changed: more jobless, more corruption and more repression.

On Thursday 9/5/2012 136 hopeless youth took a small boat and tried to escape illegally to Italy for a
better life, for a better future.

But they got lost in the Mediterranean. Only few were saved, but the others died or are still lost.

One of the dead youth was NADER BOUHOUCH, 23, from Sidi Bouzid, the birthplace of the Tunisian
revolution. Nader was also very active during the revolution and joined with his countrymen to
emancipate Tunisia from a regime that repressed the country for more than 23 years.

But the revolution didn’t t fulfill the dreams of NADER and the Tunisian Youth, the dream of
jobs, freedom and dignity.