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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens

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Moscow May 6th Prisoners Rally (5 of 18)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
06 May 2013

Thousands gathered in Moscow in in support of opposition activists who were arrested at last year's May 6 rally on Bolotnaya Square in a rally during Putin's entrance into office. Protester show a Alexey Navalny pamphlet.

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Moscow May 6th Prisoners Rally (4 of 18)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
06 May 2013

Thousands gathered in Moscow in in support of opposition activists who were arrested at last year's May 6 rally on Bolotnaya Square in a rally during Putin's entrance into office. Banners show the 27 people arrested int he occasion.

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Moscow May 6th Prisoners Rally (2 of 18)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
06 May 2013

Thousands gathered in Moscow in in support of opposition activists who were arrested at last year's May 6 rally on Bolotnaya Square in a rally during Putin's entrance into office.

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Yemen's Youth Revolution Remembered (...
Sana'a, Yemen
By luke_somers
12 Feb 2013

Family members of some of the thousands of protesters who lost their lives in Yemen's Youth Revolution carried photos of their deceased loved ones on the two-year anniversary of the revolution’s launch.

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MOURNING THE DISAPPEARED - Editor's P...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Editor's Picks
18 Nov 2012

On Saturday, November 17, a Lebanese Human Rights organization gathered families for a march from Beirut National Museum to Downtown Beirut in memory of the approximately 17,000 disappeared persons missing since the Lebanese civil war 30 years ago. Women sadly displayed photos of their disappeared loved ones, wishing to know whether their loved ones are still alive, or if not, if their remains can be returned for a family burial

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In the land of God: the Huaorani trib...
Pastaza Ecuador
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Oct 2012

Cononaco Bameno-Ecuador(South America) October 27th-2012-EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY.
The Huaorani, also known as the Waos, are native Amerindians from the Amazonian Region of Ecuador (Napo, Orellana and Pastaza Provinces) who have marked differences from other ethnic groups from Ecuador. They comprise almost 4,000 inhabitants and speak the Huaorani language, a linguistic isolate that is not known to be related to any other language. Their ancestral lands are located between the Curaray and Napo rivers, about 50 miles (80 km) south of El Coca. These homelands – approximately 120 miles (190 km) wide and 75 to 100 miles (120 to 160 km) from north to south – are threatened by oil exploration. In 1993, the Huaorani, and Quichua indigenous people, filed a lawsuit against Texaco oil company for the environmental damages caused by oil extraction activities in the Lago Agrio oil field. After handing control of the oil fields to an Ecuadorian oil company, Texaco did not properly dispose of its hazardous waste, causing great damages to the ecosystem and crippling communities. And recently, an US oil giant, has been fined $8.6 billion, for causing devastating pollution in large parts of the Ecuadorian Amazon basin, where Huaorani tribe lives. The oil firm Texaco, wich merged with Chevron in 2001, had been accused of dumping billions of gallons of toxic waste into unlined pits in the Amazon’s rainforest and rivers. Tribes indigenous to the area, like the Huaorani, have campaigned for almost two decades against the firm’s actions, saying that the poisonous waste has increased cancer rates, killed wildlife and contaminated water.In the past, Huaorani were able to protect their culture and lands from both indigenous enemies and settlers but the fighting against the multinational oil company, still goes on.
In the last 40 years, they have shifted from a hunting and gathering society to live mostly in permanent forest settlements. In traditional animist Huaorani worldview, there is no distinction between the physical and spiritual worlds, and spirits are present throughout the world. The Huaorani once believed that the entire world was a forest (and used the same word, ömë, for both). The Oriente’s rainforest of Ecuador, remains the essential basis of their physical and cultural survival. For them, the forest is home, while the outside world is considered unsafe: living in the forest offered protection from the witchcraft and attacks of neighboring peoples.
The Huaorani believe the animals of their forest have a spiritual as well as physical existence. They believe that a person who dies walks a trail to the afterlife which has a large anaconda snake lying in wait. Those among the dead who cannot escape the snake fail to enter the domain of dead spirits and return to Earth to become animals, often termites. This underlies a mix of practices that recognize and respect animals, but does not shield them from harm for human use.
Hunting supplies a major part of the Huaorani diet and is of cultural significance. Traditionally, the creatures hunted were limited to monkeys, birds, and wild peccaries. Neither land-based predators nor birds of prey are hunted. Traditionally there was an extensive collection of hunting and eating taboos. They refused to eat deer, on the grounds that deer eyes look similar to human eyes. While a joyful activity, hunting (even permitted animals) has ethical ramifications: “The Huaorani must kill animals to live, but they believed dead animal spirits live on and must be placated or else do harm in angry retribution.” To counterbalance the offense of hunting, a shaman demonstrated respect through the ritual preparation of the poison, curare, used in blow darts. Hunting with such darts is not considered killing, but retrieving, essentially a kind of harvesting from the trees. Spearing wild peccaries, on the other hand, is killing and is practiced with violence and rage.
While never hunted, two other animals, the snake and the jaguar, have special significance for the Huaorani. Snakes are considered "the most evil force in the Huaorani cosmology", particularly the imposing (though nonvenemous) anaconda, or obe. A giant obe stands in the way of the forest trail that the dead follow to an afterlife with the creator in the sky. Here on earth, snakes are a bad omen, and traditionally killing them is considered taboo.
The Huaorani identify deeply with the jaguar, an important and majestic predator in the Oriente province of Ecuador. According to myth, the Huaorani were the descendants of a mating between a jaguar and an eagle. Elders became shamans by metaphorically adopting “jaguar sons” whose spirits communicate medical and spiritual knowledge. In the Huaorani belief system, jaguar shamans are able “to become a jaguar, and so to travel great distances telepathically and communicate with other Huaorani.”
Plants, especially trees, continue to hold a complex and important interest for the Huaorani. Their store of botanical knowledge is extensive, ranging from knowledge of materials to poisons to hallucinogens to medicines. They also relate plants to their own experiences, particularly that of growing. Among trees, certain kinds are auspicious. Canopy trees, with their distinctly colored young leaves and striking transformation as they mature to towering giants, are “admired for their solitary character … as well as for their profuse entanglement” with other plants. Other significant trees are the pioneer species of the peach palm (used for making spears and blowguns, as well as for fruit), and fast-growing balsa wood, used for ceremonial purposes. Peach palm trees are associated with past settlements and the ancestors who live there.
The Huaorani notion of time is particularly oriented to the present, with few obligations extending backwards or forwards in time. Their one word for future times, baane, also means "tomorrow". Spears are the main weapons of the Huaorani culture used in person to person conflict.
Their main hunting weapon is the blowgun. These weapons are typically from 3 to 4 metres long. The arrows used are dipped in curare poison, which paralyzes the muscles of the animal which is hit with it, so that it cannot breathe. Kapok fluff is used to create an air-tight seal, by twisting the fibers around the end of the dart or arrow. The pictures shows an ancient rituals between young huaorani women, painting their faces with the red ocra colour.

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MALAYSIA: PEACEFUL PROTEST; RELIGIOUS...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
19 Sep 2012

With volatile reactions to the inflammatory Islam-insulting film spanning throughout many Muslim communities, the subject of defaming religion is at the forefront. The issue was addressed by Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby at a press conference on Wednesday, September 19, joined by other members of the Arab League, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation and the African and European Unions, who are reportedly all working to reaching an agreement against religious defamation.

Meanwhile, young members of the Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party encouraged ongoing protests to the insulting film, however they stressed that keeping protests peaceful is essential to getting the message across.

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Myanmar - Taunggy Handicapped Center
Taunggy Myanmar
By Mais Istanbuli
04 Sep 2012

Catholic Nuns run this center for disabled people in Taunggy, Myanmar. State run hospitals do not have enough experience to deal with handicapped people, so they can only rely on thic catholic centre.

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Multimedia / Fear and Ammo inTexas
Dallas, Texas
By Spike Johnson
01 Sep 2010

An audio and visual slideshow

The Texas Survivalists is a militia group operating in the suburbs of Dallas, a mile from a middle school softball stadium. For them, bad times are coming: economic collapse, overnight inflation, nuclear war, epidemic, invasion and fuel shortages. The Survivalists – maybe a dozen in all, men and women in their early 20s to late 50s such as Trust Harold Rosenbaum, a Vietnam veteran, Ralph Severe, an armed security guard and Patricia, who is recovering from breast cancer – are steps ahead of most. They are combat training, storing food, stockpiling ammo, planning escape routes, packing survival kits, making soap and, most of all, assuring themselves that they don’t need another human alive to survive.

Their preparations can seem extreme to an outsider. They always pack a pistol and a supply of hollow-point rounds to cause maximum injury. They hide homemade knives around their living rooms. (Under the bookshelf is a favorite spot.) They place bug-out bags the size of coffee tables in the hallway, in preparation to run. Their survival kits bulge with dried food, clothes, ammunition and seeds - everything to start a new life. They have ceased living with day-to-day annoyances. They leave dishes dirty in the sink (Why wash when tomorrow's not coming?), let dust settle on the television, and seem oblivious to possessions piled in disarray on bare floors. Regular housework seems pointless when you're preparing to escape a collapsing city at a moment's notice.

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Protest Journey
Bolivia, Paraguay, Brazil
By Kirk Ellingham
01 Jul 2009

A two month journey following indigenous protests from Paraguay to Bolivia in 2007.

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Mother Teresa's Visit to Canada
Saint Paul, AB, Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

On June 25, 1982, Mother Teresa visited St. Paul, Alberta, to receive a gift from the community — money to build a leper colony in India. The day was hot and sunny. Hundreds of people from St. Paul and the region thronged to the Landing Pad to see the iconic Sister accept the gift the people had bestowed on her. Premier Peter Lougheed was on the pad with Mother Teresa, as were representatives from Saddle Lake and other officials. A parade ensued. It was led by Mother Teresa who was in the passenger seat of a jeep, followed by crowds of her admirers and supporters. Residents of the seniors’ lodge, who couldn’t walk to the event, lined the curb outside of the lodge to watch the parade roll by. Whenever she stopped, she went among the people, meeting and exchanging a few words with the adults and chatting with children, who were clearly in awe of her presence. A children’s choir sang.

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Mother Teresa Thanks People of St. Pa...
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

On June 25, 1982, Mother Teresa visited St. Paul, Alberta, to receive a $925,000 gift from the community — money to build a leper colony in India.

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Mother Teresa Attracts Hundreds of Ci...
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

The day was hot and sunny. Hundreds of people from St. Paul and the region thronged to see the iconic Sister accept the gift the people had bestowed on her. A parade ensued. It was led by Mother Teresa who was in the passenger seat of a jeep, followed by crowds of her admirers and supporters.

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Mt, lougheed, priest
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

Premier of Alberta, Peter Lougheed, attended the important event, as did the Chief of the Saddle Lake First Nation and religious leaders in the region.

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Hands of Mother Teresa
Saint Paul, AB
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

"Give of your hands to serve and your heart to love." ~ Mother Teresa

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The Feet of Mother Teresa
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

"Love has a hem to her garment that reaches the very dust. It sweeps the streets and lanes, and because it can, it must." ~ Mother Teresa

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Mother Teresa Prays with Humility at ...
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

The amount of the gift was significant and Mother Teresa was humbled by the generosity of the people of St. Paul, Alberta.

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Seniors Sit in the Sun to Greet Mothe...
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

Residents of the seniors’ lodge, who couldn’t walk to the event, lined the curb outside of the lodge to watch Mother Teresa's entourage roll by.

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Mother Teresa Greets People in the Crowd
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

Whenever she stopped, she went among the people, meeting and exchanging a few words.

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Children's Choir Serenades Mother Teresa
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

A children's choir sang sweetly to honor Mother Teresa's visit.

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Mother Teresa Blesses the Children
St Paul, Alberta,Canada
By Anne Georg
23 Jun 1982

Mother Teresa was generous, chatting with children, who were clearly in awe of her presence.