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Armenian-Egyptians Commemorate 'Genoc...
Cairo
By Mohamed AbouElenen
23 Apr 2015

Cairo, Egypt
April 23, 2015

Egyptians of Armenian descent commemorated the centenary anniversary of the massacres committed against their ancestors by the Ottoman Empire in the First World War. Dozens of spectators examined photographs, artifacts and books that tell the story of the mass killings in 1915 as well as the Armenian diaspora around the world. The exhibition was organized by The Armenian Club in Cairo.

The Armenian community in Egypt, which was formed mainly of people who fled the killings by Ottoman Turks, dwindled in the 1950s, as many non-Arabs left the country under the weight of nationalization policies conducted by President Gamal Abdel Nasser. Around 8,000 Armenians live in Egypt today according to an interviewed activist.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of young women in traditional Armenian garbs
Various of spectators examining artefacts that belonged to Armenian refugees
Various of event attendees eating traditional Armenian snacks

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Garen Garbouyan, A young Armenian-Egyptian taking part in commemoration
00:30 – 01:14
“This event is being held because April 24 is nearing. This year is the 100th anniversary of the genocide. On this occasion, we are holding several consecutive events. In this celebration, we are introducing people to the old four Arminian provinces. We are showing how people used to dress in each province, as well as what people there used to eat and the activities they did. I am here today because my ancestors fled the massacre and came by boats to Port Said.”

Various of embroidered artefacts
Tilt down of icon with inscription in Armenian

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Marlo Zamanian, Armenian-Egyptian attending the exhibition

01:35 – 01:52
“My mother’s grandfather was forced to flee in 1915. He fled the massacres; his parents were able to flee the massacres and eventually reached Egypt.”

Various/ Close-up of artefacts
Wide of spectator examining a poster
Close-up/ Zoom out of necklace
Various of map featuring the massacres against Armenians
Various of exhibited items

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Marlo Zamanian, Armenian-Egyptian attending the exhibition
02:41 – 03:16
“My mother says that her father used to say… [LAUGH] that on a day in April – on April 24, 1915 – that the Turks knocked on their door. They come from a province called Kharpet. The Turks knocked on their door and took my mother’s grandfather who never returned. They took him to an unknown location. This was their end. My mother’s grandmother was able to rescue her children. She had a boy and two girls. She was able to leave and take them with her.”

Various of photographs depicting people who were killed in the massacres
Various of exhibition items and photographs

Close-up of a comb. NAT Sound (Arabic) 03:56 – 04:04
“This is from 1909. Look at the design.”

Wide of two girls wearing traditional costumes and holding a metal artefact

Close-up of metal artefact. NAT Sound (Arabic) 04:09 – 04:14
"This is the goblet I was talking about. It was used to fill water.” Close-up pf traditional puppet

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Marlo Zamanian, Armenian-Egyptian attending the exhibition
04:21 – 04:42
“We thank Egypt as well as the entire Arab homeland. This was the closest area to us, the [Armenian] migrants. From the desert of Deir al-Zor, we entered Syria and Lebanon. Other people fled to Greece. I feel that Arab countries were more welcoming towards than Europe.”

Various of event attendees having traditional snacks
Various of books about the Armenian genocide

Cutaways of Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide

SOUNDBITE Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide
05:29 – 06:23
“My grandfather’s family was a leading a decent life in Turkey. They were among the prominent merchants who traded in figs and pureblood horses in Turkey. His father and brothers were all killed in the massacres. He was young and another family smuggled him to Greece. In Greece, he worked for several years at the harbour with Onassis. As you know, Onassis became one of the world’s billionaires. Afterwards, my grandfather came to Egypt where lived and worked. He owned Nassibian film studio.”

Cutaways of Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide
06:24 – 06:48
“Currently, about 8,000 Armenians live in Egypt. Their number was more than 50,000 during the 1940s and 1950s, but most of them immigrated to Armenia -- they returned to Armenia – as well as Europe, America and Australia.”

Cutaways of Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo
06:56 – 07:10
“The method to slaughter [Armenians] is the same as the one that is being deployed by ISIS. They were lined up and killed with knives. The target was extermination; to make that area devoid of Armenians.”

Cutaways of Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo

Wide of man contemplating ‘Genocide Map’

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo
07:25 – 07:50
“There are about 3 million people living in present-day Armenia, while 9 million [Armenians] live outside. These 9 million did not appear out of nowhere. Our ancestors fled Armenia, and therefore Armenians were displaced in the entire world. Yet, some say that the massacres did not take place. Each one of us Armenians has a story to tell and knows how his grandfather fled the massacres. We see this as a problem.”

Cutaways of Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour
08:06 – 08:47

“The Armenian issue surfaced in 1878, as a result of Article 61 of the treaty of Berlin, which stipulated the implementation of reforms in ‘Armenistan’, or Ottoman Armenia in eastern Anatolia. Ottoman authorities refused to carry out these reforms. Armenians then had to resort to revolutionary action to pressure Europe and the Ottoman Empire to implement Article 61.”

Cutaways of Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour
09:11 – 09:43
“If Turkey to recognizes the massacres, it would have to return eastern Anatolia as well as all the funds, the assets and real estates that were confiscated from Armenians. Turkey would have to spend huge amounts of money as indemnities to the Armenian people who succumbed to a genocide, which the entire world is heading to recognize.”

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ISIS Operate Islamic Courts and Water...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

ISIS functionaries claim to have introduced both Islamic courts and a functioning department of water management in Raqqa. In this video, several people can be seen at an ISIS-run Islamic sharia court. Interviewed plaintiffs say they are pleased with legal services provided under ISIS - which they consider fair and considerably better than what they experienced under the Syrian regime.

Footage also includes an interview with a functionary at the local department of water management. The official claims that his staff are purifying water and conducting studies to develop better provision of water.

TRANSCRIPT AND SHOTLIST

Wide of al-Dillah roundabout
Wide of propaganda billboards “God’s sharia should be the arbiter.” “The crusader against Islam.”
Wide of Al-Fawwaz Mosque
Wide of shops
Wide of children and man washing before prayer
Various of street food stands
Wide of two men eating
Wide of school girls walking
Wide of women and children in al-Rashid Park
Various of shops
Wide of military equipment store
Wide of fighter looking at fabrics
Wide of propaganda billboard “The traitors of Islam”
Wide of propaganda billboards that read: “Arab tyrants, your hands are tarnished with Muslims’ blood.” “The crusade against Islam.”
Wide of ISIS flag in the street
Various of preaching stand broadcasting Quranic recitation
Various of ISIS traffic police

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, Water department official and ISIS member

01:53 – 02:37

"In the name of God and prayers be upon Prophet Mohammad. We, at the water department in Wilayat Raqqa [Raqqa Province], the Islamic State, are providing water for the common people. We are conducting repairs and mechanical works in all projects in Wilayat Raqqa. Water is being purified using chlorine and liquid hypochlorite then pumped in the grid. The water department follows up on complaints and technical failures, as well as applies necessary repairs in various workshops in Wilayat Raqqa. Finally, the Studies Department performs studies necessary for new projects to cover people’s current and future needs for water. Thanks be to God almighty. Peace be upon you.”

Wide of men’s entrance to Islamic court

Wide of women’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of men’s entrance to Islamic court

Various of people walking into court

Various of people sitting inside the court
Various of ISIS legal workers receiving files from plaintiffs
Various of court waiting room
Wide of ISIS legal worker handling files
Various of court waiting room
Various/ close-ups of legal documents

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Humam al-Ansari, legal worker at Islamic court run by ISIS
03:38 – 04:12
“In the name of God the Merciful the Compassionate, and God’s prayers be upon Prophet Mohamad and his family and companions. Thanks be to Good who enabled us to conquer these lands. Thanks be to God who enable us to establish these courts of law in Wilyat al-Raqqa [Name ISIS uses for Raqqa province].
Thanks be to God, we are fulfilling our work to grant all people their rights and correct any injustice that has befallen our Muslim brothers. Today, judges and everyone else are fulfilling their work to apply God’s sharia law. We treat people as our brethren.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad al-Rashed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:12 – 04:38

“Peace be upon you. We are before the Islamic court in the city of Raqqa. Thanks be to God, the treatment is very good. Under the regime, if someone wanted to come to the court he would have had to pay bribes. People with legitimate rights suffered injustice. This was always the case. Thanks be to God, at the present time, treatment cannot be any better. One’s rights have been reinstated, God willing. Your right will not be lost, even if you were entitled to something as small as a particle.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Munir Ahmed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:39 – 05:20
“Thanks be to God almighty, I presented a case at the Islamic court in Wilyat Raqqa. Thanks be to God, there is cooperation on behalf of the judges and the other brothers. They understand people’s needs. Thanks be to God. I have a lawsuit that involves myself and another person. We resorted to God’s sharia law and the verdict has not been issued yet. Thanks be to God for everything.
Thanks be to God that we got rid of that infidel and debauched regime. Previously, if you were entitled to a right, you would be treated as a wrongdoer. One had to bribe judges and officials."

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ISIS Issues Resident ID Cards in Raqqa
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of these videos on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

Video shows the civil status office in Raqqa, ISIS' biggest stronghold in Syria. Syrian citizens can be seen handing over their IDs issued by the Syrian government and receiving ones given to them by ISIS authorities. Ibrahim is applying for a birth certificate for his 1-year old son Sufian who, according to his father, was born when the Free Syrian Army was still in control of the city. At the time, government offices were closed and he was not able to obtain the proper documentation. Today he says that he is grateful that the “Islamic State” is reactivating government services.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of ISIS traffic police
Various of ISIS police (al-Hisba) vehicles broadcasting calls for prayer
Various of vehicle broadcasting ISIS anthem
Vaious of street food stands
Various of fighter carrying a rifle and a baby at the market
Various of people in park
Wide of ISIS’ Personal Status Office (PSO)
Various of people entering PSO to apply for IDs
Various of people applying for IDs
Close-ups of retrieved IDs issued by the Syrian government
Various of preparing new IDs
Close-up of personal status data displayed on computer
Various of entering data related to new IDs using computers
Various of people being given their new IDs
Various of Raqqa resident Khaled and his baby Sufian inside taxi on their way to PSO
Various of Khaled and his baby Sufian entering PSO
Various of ISIS employee filling in information for birth certificate
Various of man applying for birth certificate
Various of witness singing application
Various of witnesses signing application
Various of application process

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ibrahim, the father of baby Sufian whose birth certificate is being issued
04:16 – 04:52

“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate. I had a newborn about a year ago. You can see him. He is about one year old. At that time, the Free Syrian Army was present and there were no government offices.
Thanks be to God, now that the Islamic State is present, government offices are being gradually activated. One of these departments is the Personal Status Office, where they [ISIS members] are registering newly born babies.”

Various of Khaled receiving birth certificate and leaving building
Various of street food stands
Wide of perfume shop
Various of shops
Various of al-Dalla Roundabout
Wide of men praying in the street
Wide of billboard calling people to pay Zaqat (Islamic alms)
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “Now… now… the fighting has come.”
Wide of street
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his messenger.”

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ISIS-Run Government Institutions in R...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in any way constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

At the personal status office in Raqqa, ISIS' biggest stronghold in Syria, Syrian citizens can be seen handing over their IDs issued by the Syrian government and receiving ones given to them by ISIS authorities. Ibrahim is applying for a birth certificate for his one-year-old son Sufian who, according to his father, was born when the Free Syrian Army was still in control of the city. At the time, government offices were closed and he was not able to obtain the proper documentation. Today he says that he is grateful that the “Islamic State” is reactivating government services.
ISIS functionaries claim to have introduced both Islamic courts and a functioning department of water management in Raqqa. In this video, several people can be seen at an ISIS-run Islamic sharia court. Interviewed plaintiffs say they are pleased with legal services provided under ISIS - which they consider fair and considerably better than what they experienced under the Syrian regime.
Footage also includes an interview with a functionary at the local department of water management. The official claims that his staff are purifying water and conducting studies to develop better provision of water.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of streets
Various of fighter carrying a rifle and a baby at the market
Wide of mosque
Various of children, women and men in park
Wide of market
Various of street food stands
Wide of perfume shop
Wide of two men eating
Wide of schoolgirls walking
Wide of women and children in al-Rashid Park
Wide of vegetable shop
Wide of street food cart
Wide of military equipment store
Wide of jewelry store
Wide of fighter looking at fabrics
Wide of women in front shops
Wide of children and man washing before prayer
Various of women buying candy for children in park
Wide of armed man with children in park
Various of al-Dillah roundabout (coffee pot fountain)
Wide of men praying in the street
Wide of men’s entrance to Islamic court
Wide of women’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of men’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of people walking into court
Various of people sitting inside the court
Various of ISIS legal workers receiving files from plaintiffs
Various of court waiting room
Various of ISIS legal worker handling files
Various of court waiting room
Various/ close-ups of legal documents

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Humam al-Ansari, legal worker at Islamic court run by ISIS

03:29 – 04:02

“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate, and God’s prayers be upon Prophet Mohamad and his family and companions. Thanks be to Good who enabled us to conquer these lands. Thanks be to God who enable us to establish these courts of law in Wilayat al-Raqqa [Name ISIS uses for Raqqa province]. Thanks be to God, we are fulfilling our work to grant all people their rights and correct any injustice that has befallen our Muslim brothers. Today, judges and everyone else are fulfilling their work to apply God’s sharia law. We treat people as our brethren.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad al-Rashed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS
04:03 – 04:30
“Peace be upon you. We are before the Islamic court in the city of Raqqa. Thanks be to God, the treatment is very good. Under the regime, if someone wanted to come to the court he would have had to pay bribes. People with legitimate rights suffered injustice. This was always the case. Thanks be to God, at the present time, treatment cannot be any better. One’s rights have been reinstated, God willing. Your right will not be lost, even if you were entitled to something as small as a particle.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Munir Ahmed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:31 – 05:11

“Thanks be to God almighty, I presented a case at the Islamic court in Wilayat Raqqa. Thanks be to God, there is cooperation on behalf of the judges and the other brothers. They understand people’s needs. Thanks be to God. I have a lawsuit that involves myself and another person. We resorted to God’s sharia law and the verdict has not been issued yet. Thanks be to God for everything. Thanks be to God that we got rid of that infidel and debauched regime. Previously, if you were entitled to a right, you would be treated as a wrongdoer. One had to bribe judges and officials."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, Water department official and ISIS member

05:12 – 05:55

"In the name of God and prayers be upon Prophet Mohammad. We, at the water department in Wilayat Raqqa [Raqqa Province], the Islamic State, are providing water for the common people. We are conducting repairs and mechanical works in all projects in Wilayat Raqqa. Water is being purified using chlorine gas and liquid hypochlorite then pumped in the grid. The water department follows up on complaints and technical failures, as well as applies necessary repairs in various workshops in Wilayat Raqqa. Finally, the Studies Department performs studies necessary for new projects to cover people’s current and future needs for water. Thanks be to God almighty. Peace be upon you.”

Wide of Clock Tower square
Wide of Raqqa and large ISIS flag
Wide of propaganda billboards that read: “Arab tyrants, your hands are tarnished with Muslims’ blood.” “The crusade against Islam.”
Wide of roundabout and ISIS flags
Wide of billboard calling people to pay Zakat (Islamic alms)
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “Now… now… the fighting has come.”
Wide of street
Various of loudspeaker in ISIS preaching office broadcasting Quran
Wide of propaganda billboard “The traitors of Islam”
Wide of roundabout
Wide of propaganda billboards “God’s sharia should be the arbiter.” “The crusader against Islam.”
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his messenger.”
Various of ISIS police (al-Hisba) vehicles broadcasting calls for prayer
Various of vehicle broadcasting ISIS anthem
Various of ISIS traffic police
Wide of ISIS-run Personal Status Office (PSO)
Various of people entering PSO to apply for IDs
Various of people applying for IDs
Various of ISIS employees entering data related to new IDs using computers
Close-ups of IDs issued by the Syrian government
Various of ISIS employees preparing new IDs
Close-up of personal status data displayed on computer
Various of people being given their new IDs
Various of Raqqa resident Ibrahim and his baby Sufian inside taxi on their way to PSO
Various of Ibrahim and his baby Sufian entering PSO
Various of ISIS employee filling in information for birth certificate
Various of Ibrahim applying for birth certificate
Various of witness singing application
Wide of baby Sufian
Wide of Ibrahim signing application

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ibrahim, the father of baby Sufian whose birth certificate is being issued

10:32 – 11:08
“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate. I had a newborn about a year ago. You can see him. He is about one year old. At that time, the Free Syrian Army was present and there were no government offices. Thanks be to God, now that the Islamic State is present, government offices are being gradually activated. One of these departments is the Personal Status Office, where they [ISIS members] are registering newly born babies.”

Various of Khaled receiving birth certificate and leaving building
Various of street food stands

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The Streets of Raqqa
Raqqa
By Transterra Editor
25 Oct 2014

October 25, 2014
Raqqa, Syria

As the US-led airstrikes against the Islamic State group continue, life goes on in the IS capital of Raqqa. Evidence of IS governance abound on things like billboards, which remind women to cover their faces, and fighters acting as traffic police. Shops go about business as usual, trading in US Dollars and Syrian Pounds, but also facing the challenge of import restrictions.

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Otro Cielo (Another Sky) - An Uruguay...
Montevideo
By Francesco Pistilli
21 Sep 2014

Another Sky is a journey into Uruguayan dailylife at the time of Pepe Mujica, a documentary work focused on social changes taking place in the country. Looking for answers, I drove over 1300km from the capital Montevideo, to the north (the poorest regions) and to the east, to learn the truth about a people who craves change and hope for a new brighter future.
Another Sky is a road-trip along the utopia, through civil rights, rural culture, african religion and alternative lifestyles.

The country's economy currently is growing stronger, but in the remote countryside an old culture seems untouched by globalization. Almost 100 thousand people, Gauchos, Peones or farmers still share the environment with animals. With three cows per person Uruguay, is one of the biggest "meat-economies" in the world; and 75% of the country's exports are agriculture related.

In Montevideo, where about one-third of the country population lives, you find a place where politics and football dominate discussions and social life.

Uruguay is a place where sailors, European immigrants and African slaves left their stories, their incomprehensible melancholy and their different traditions. Uruguay is a "latin hope" spiced with meat, cerveza, Umbanda (an Afro-Brazilian faith) and Socialism.

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Gaza: Assessing the Damage
Gaza
By Andrea DiCenzo
25 Aug 2014

After what was possibly the most destructive war in Gaza in recent history, residents of the besieged coastal enclave finally have a chance to assess the damage done to their homes and properties. For the thousands left homeless by the hostilities, life is now a painstaking process of rebuilding the little that remains of their possessions.

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North Korea in Color 009
By Ulrik Pedersen
11 Jun 2014

Soldiers taking pictures of each other at Mount Pakteu in northern North Korea.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 011
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
20 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Ski equipment in a guest house in Bamiyan, where the Afghan Ski Challenge takes place every year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 009
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, with homemade skis made out of wood. "Our village, Jawzeri, consists of approximately 65 houses. Around 30 people from here are trying to learn how to ski, but only 10 really know how to do it well. We don't have any proper equipment and nobody is here to teach us, so we simply ski on the slopes around our village with our homemade skis made out of wood."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 010
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, with homemade skis made out of wood. "The first time we saw skis in our lives was in 2011 when foreigners from the US and Switzerland came to Bamiyan to ski here. We saw their equipment and wanted to try it as well."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 008
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, with homemade skis made out of wood. "Our village has never received proper ski equipment, but we wanted to learn it and had to be creative. So one boy in the village had the idea to make wooden skis with plastic underneath. We cut all the wood ourselves and shape it, it takes two days to finish one pair of skis."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 007
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Most villagers in Jawzeri think that skiing is a very good sport and exercise. We are really keen to learn and keep practicing, and our biggest dream is to have proper equipment one day and represent the village - or even Afghanistan - in different ski competitions."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 004
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Here in Jawzeri you can find a lot of enthusiasm and motivation for skiing, despite that fact that we don't get any support for this new sport. In Bamiyan village, for example, there is a group of young Afghans who participate in the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place every year. They have proper skis, equipment and support from some foreigners - hopefully we will be able to participate one day, too."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 006
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Villagers stand and watch the skiing. Sultan Ali, 18, "Here in Jawzeri, in our village, we only have one real pair of skis and boots which we got from foreigners some months ago. But that's all we have, we have no ski boots, no skins for the skis to be able to walk up the mountains and no poles. At least the skis we can make out of wood and plastic."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 005
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Some older people in our village, let's call them the traditional ones, are a bit skeptical about skiing. We don't have any doctors here and if we fall and get injured we would have a serious problem. At the beginning, most of them didn't like the idea of skiing at all, but now they start to open up and pray with us to get proper equipment."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 002
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, tries on his homemade wooden skis. "We are the first ones who started making wooden skis. Nowadays we have around 10 wooden skis in our village. The second village is called Chap Dara and they also produce their own skis made out of wood...but here at Jawzeri we were the first".

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Skiing in Afghanistan 003
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Some months ago, there was a young man from New Zealand who came to the village with proper ski equipment and taught some people here how to ski. He used to come 2-3 times a week, he worked temporarily in Bamiyan. But now he has returned to New Zealand and nobody really comes to Jawzeri as we are quite off the beaten track."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 001
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali tries on his homemade wooden skis. "Our wooden skis are not professional at all but they do the job. The bad thing is that we don't have skins to put underneath so that we can walk up the hills easily. We don't have ski-lifts in Afghanistan, so at least we would need some ski skins like the boys have in the Bamiyan village." Sultan Ali (18 years, Jawzeri, Afghanistan)

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Skiing in Afghanistan 029
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans gets ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge which takes place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 028
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Spectators from the village watch the group of young Afghans skiing in Bamiyan province, Afghanistan.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 022
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Member of the Afghanistan ski team Sajjad Husaini, 22, says, "Skiing in Afghanistan was introduced by American and Swiss foreigners about 5 years ago. All the equipment we have here in Bamiyan was brought by foreign skiers, and now we have almost 20 skis and proper equipment as poles, boots and skins which is fantastic for us."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 023
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 012
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Member of the Afghanistan ski team Sajjad Husaini, 22, "Here in Bamiyan you can ski from January to March and every winter foreigners come and teach us how to ski properly. Four of us locals are now even working as ski guides for other Afghans interested in learning how to ski. There is no test you have to pass here in Bamiyan, you become a guide by experience."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 027
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sajjad Husaini, 22, member of the Afghan ski team, "We, the serious skiers from Bamiyan, want to become professional skiers and guides and represent Afghanistan in international competitions one day. We have been participating at the annually Afghan Ski Challenge here in Bamiyan and I even won the boys challenge last year. Unfortunately, there is no ski federation, infrastructure or real support yet in Afghanistan."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 026
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sajjad Husaini, 22, member of the Afghan ski team, "We, the ski guys from Bamiyan, have been skiing for around 3 years now and teach more and more to locals who want to get into skiing. Many of our foreign friends from Switzerland, the US, New Zealand and Italy support us, and the Afghan Ski Challenge is getting more and more popular every year. We have hope that the Afghan ski business will get big and flourishing in the future."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 025
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year. Member of the team Rahimullah Attayeezada, 20, said "From January to March we go skiing regularly here in Bamiyan, we have to train for the Afghan Ski Challenge. This year was the 4th ski challenge and there are also participants from other countries. But usually the locals win as we are faster running up the hill."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 021
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. Rahimullah, 20, "I am very happy to have the possibility to ski here in Bamiyan, and I am aware that most of the people here don't have access to this sport and lack proper equipment. Now even the girls participate at the Afghan Ski Challenge, we have a boys and a girls competition. Believe me, that is big step forward for my country."

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 018
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan A young villager watches the group of Afghans skiing.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 017
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Spectators watch the group of young Afghans skiing in Bamiyan province, Afghanistan.

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 013
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Member of the Afghanistan ski team Sajjad Husaini, 22, "I spent 12 years of my life as a refugee in central Iran. When I returned to Afghanistan, my uncle introduced me to Gul Hussain Baizada, one of the local supports of the Afghan Ski Challenge. That was in 2011, and since then I have been skiing and training with all my passion. In the evening I go to university to study law, but I wish to become a professional skier to represent Afghanistan in the future."

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October 6th Protests 10
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
07 Oct 2013

Protestors hold up rocks that are thrown at security forces. "They have guns, and this is all we have," said one young protestor.

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Turkey, Istanbul
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens/