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Protected Areas
Madrid
By Victoria Herranz
14 Aug 2014

Can a government decide over the woman body?

Protected Areas explores the reaction to the spanish government’s propose to modified to change the abortion law for part of women than see limited their rights. Also, with an analogy between the woman body and the public area, it’s proposes the metaphoric relation between both than struggle area for the politic and ideologic dominant powers in the actual spanish society.

Protected Areas is a work of the spanish authors Victoria Herranz (Madrid, 1983) photojournalist, Jose Mansilla (Sevilla, 1974) anthropologist and David Cordero (Murcia, 1979) filmmaker. In collaboration with doSIguALes Producciones. The production process is completed in May 2014.

Edition: 23 September 2014. The Spanish Government can give up its reform’s propose. The Minister of Justice, Alberto Ruiz Gallardón (reform autor) let up his position.

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Documentaries
Worldwide
By Mais Istanbuli
25 Nov 2013

TRANSTERRA is becoming more than just a marketplace where producers can showcase and sell their documentaries. We are a resource for archive footage, and a community that provides collaboration opportunities.

The documentaries shown here are part of TRANSTERRA's greater catalog of options. Full-length screenings are available for most, and you can access these by sending an e-mail request to [email protected].

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If You Eat Garlic, You Will Get Full
Heraat, Afghanistan
By Transterra Editor
04 Oct 2013

This film features the miserable life of a group of children in the western city of the Heraat province of Afghanistan by showing their work on the streets of the city.

More importantly, it shows the ill behavior of the residents of the city toward these kids. The film shows how they are treated as outcasts in the society, with people not allowing them in the sports fields, shops, and so on.

The film is ten minutes long.
By: Sara Keawal

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Aging with Regrets
Nairobi, Kenya
By Sam Charo
08 Aug 2013

An old woman worries about her aging without insurance and benefits. For a long time the Kenyan government had an elitist retirement scheme. One woman tells her journey on finding her daily bread and shares her fears for not having a sound insurance mechanism to shield her on her sunset years.

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Alp & Anna
Nicosia, Cyprus
By Vasia Markides
26 Jul 2013

'Alp and Anna' This short film features two inspiring 18-year-olds - Alparslan Balci, a Turkish Cypriot and Anna Leonidou, a Greek Cypriot. Living on the divided island of Cyprus, these two young people are active members of Youth Activism - a UNDP-ACT project that aims to encourage and inspire the youth of Cyprus to actively participate in the efforts for a peaceful solution of the Cyprus problem. Alp and Anna are friends, who have worked on joint activities implemented by the project in order to engage young people in peace building, to empower and support them to play an active role in the reconciliation process and to build support structures for them to continue in youth activism. Here, they talk about their work together, and their view on the situation in Cyprus.

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Food insecurity: Does South Korea hav...
Seoul, South Korea
By maltekol
12 Jul 2013

The World Health Organization warns that overpopulation and a lack of arable land contribute to global food insecurity. So scientists are developing new farming technology to offset potential food shortages. Researchers in South Korea are experimenting with vertical farms; gardens that instead of spreading out, go straight up.
Jason Strother and Malte Kollenberg report from Seoul.

Almost half of South Korea’s 50 millions citizens live here in the capital. And in a country with very limited agricultural land, feeding all of these people presents a challenge. Some observers say the nation faces increasing food insecurity.

Park Hwan-il is food security analyst at the Samsung Economic Research Institute in Seoul.

Int: Park Hwan-il, SERI (English)
"The food self sufficiency rate in Korea is just about 26 percent. Which means three quarters of the food we consume is from the foreign countries. That means the Korean people’s health and nutrition depends on outside factors that we cannot control”

Park says that climate conditions or other instability in the international market makes importing food unpredictable. It’s not only a problem for Korea, but for many other countries too. But some scientists say there is a solution.

Int. from online: Dickson Despommier, Columbia University (English)
“My name is Dickson Despommier: I teach at Columbia Universities Medical School and school of public health. The world would be a much better place, if we had vertical farming.”

Despommier says tower-like hydroponic farms could someday stand alongside skyscrapers as a key food source for billions of city dwellers

Int. from online: Dickson Despommier, Columbia University (English)
“Here’s my vision of what a vertical farm might look like. My gold standard for this is the Apple Store in New York City on 5th Avenue. If you took that building and made it into a five-story building. Now in the building you have multiple floors of course, and inside each floor you have multiple layers of crops.”

Despommier says vertical farms could be a key solution for countries with a growing population or limited arable land. Like South Korea.

30-kilometers south of Seoul in Suwon, the government is trying to make Despommier’s vision a reality. The Rural Development Administration has built the prototype of a vertical farm.Inside this research facility a small team of scientists is working on turning this concept a marketable product.So far, their experiment is only 3-storeys high. But they hope that one day, the technology will expand and be capable of feeding the entire nation.

Agrarian scientist Choi Kyu-hong is still sorting out more basic challenges.

Int: Choi Kyu-hong, RDA (English)
“The plant factory requires a lot of energy, the light energy and the heating and cooling energy. So we provide the heating or cooling energy using geothermal systems. We adopted the solar cell system to provide light source energies, but we are still (only) provide 15 percent of the total energy”

Choi adds his team still faces many challenges:

Int: Choi Kyu-hong, RDA (English)
“We are still (in) the research state, its take some time to make a commercial plant factories. We are firstly trying to find out the optimum wavelength of light”

Choi says the problem is that different plants grow at different speeds, depending on the light’s color and wavelength.

But even though the government hasn’t perfected vertical farming technology yet, some in the private sector are already putting it to use. Inside this Lotte Mart, a supermarket franchise in Seoul, lettuce grows under the lights of this small vertical farm.

Store mangers say produce grown in this facility has extra benefits for customers.

Int: Kim Chang-jo, Lotte Mart
(Korean) “We are the first super market to install a vertical farm. We hope that it will draw attention to environmental concerns. The plants are affordable and no pesticides were used, so its healthier for our customers”

Kim says the vertical farm lettuce costs the same as lettuce grown the old fashioned way. But some analysts say that all the lights and heating systems required to operate a vertical farm is just too expensive to make it a viable solution for food insecurity.

Int: Park Hwan-il, SERI
(English) “Vertical farming costs too much. / Even though the productivity in vertical farming is very high, very good, but it does not have the merit in price or marketing advantage at all”

Back at the Suwon experimental vertical farm, scientists admit they still have a long way to go. The Rural Development Administration’s Lee Hye jin gives a rough time frame.

Int: Lee Hye-jin, RDA
(Korean) “It might take at least five more years of research to make progress on these obstacles. Then vertical farms might be ready for commercial use”

The South Korean scientists say that once all the problems are resolved, vertical farms won't just have to stop at three-stories. The sky is the limit.

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Chronicles of Africa's Largest Slum
Nairobi, Kenya
By Sam Charo
01 Jul 2013

This is Dandora, Africa's largest slum, the African Slum Journal follows people who eke out a living by scavenging through the junkyard.
Its not only a convergence of humanity with filth, grime and dirt but also a haven of risks of diseases.
The scavengers feed on leftovers, for ages men and women in neighboring communities have been working here to find a source of income, food and find sustainable livelihood.

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First Disabled Man To Climb St. Cathe...
Cairo, Egypt
By zeer news
11 May 2013

Mazen, the first disabled person to climb St Catherine mountain in Sinai, promoting rights for disabled in Egypt

Background:

Mazen is the first disabled person to climb Mount Saint Catherine in Sinai, to promote rights for the handicapped in Egypt. Mazen contracted polio when he was 3 years old, while he was escaping Iraq with his family during the First Gulf War.

According to World Health Organization’s statistics, 10% of Egypt’s total population suffers from physical or mental disabilities. The 1975 Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons law didn't bring progress to the living conditions of the disabled. During the two years that followed the revolution, with 18 months of military rule followed by the Muslim Brotherhood’s government, Egypt’s handicapped population, estimated at over 8 million, continue to face more of the same problems. The precarious and difficult situation in a city like Cairo, one of the most chaotic in the world due to a substantial lack of infrastructure, is unfortunately only one of the many problems handicapped people face in Egypt. A lack of rights, health care and increased social marginalization inspired Mazen, who has been handicapped since the age of 3, to get involved in political activism, prompting him to join the 6th of April movement in 2010.

In November 2012, during the Mohamed Mahmoud clashes, Mazen lost his close friend and companion of the 6th of April movement, Gika. Since then, he decided to change his methods of protest, and to start a more responsible and peaceful activism campaign through symbolic actions.

Three months ago, he completed the first of several actions, climbing the Keops pyramid in Giza. On the 6th of April 2013, for the anniversary of the movement, he decided to climb the 1586 m and 750 stairs of mount Saint Catherine in Sinai.

Shots:
00:00 - 00: 44 sec intro VO

Mazen is the first disabled person to climb mount Sinai, promoting rights for handicapped people in Egypt.

According to World Health Organization, 10% of Egypt’s population, over 8 million people suffer from a disability. The Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons law of 1975 didn't improve their living conditions. In Egypt little attention is paid to the difficulties of the handicapped, especially in Cairo, one of the most chaotic cities in the world, there is a shortage of infrastructure to the assist their mobility. This is compounded by the lack of rights, poor health care and social marginalization. Mazen, handicapped since the age of 3, was inspired to get involved in political activism, before the revolution.

00:44 – 01:39 interview : presentation and problems of handicapped people in Egypt

“I am Mazen Hamza, I am 26 years old. I was born in 1987 in Iraq. I came in Egypt during the First Gulf War. I contracted the polio when I was three years old because of the vaccination. ”

“The problems that handicapped people suffer here in Egypt have been the reason why I decided to enter political activism, in order to send a message to the entire world, that handicapped people have to be integrated into society. We have problems in all aspects, in transportation, in education, in work, in housing, in airplanes, and mostly in the treatment we received by the government. I mean the government does not know how to treat handicapped people.”

01:40 – 02:03 political activism VO 6th of April / sit-in of 6th of April in front of the Ministry of Interior

Mazen became a political activist in February 2011 when he joined the 6th of April movement, the most active civil rights movements in Egypt. He first participated in debates, demonstrations and sit-ins.

In November 2012, during the clash with Security Forces and the Military Government, Mazen lost his close friend Gika, a fellow activist. This inspired him to begin a campaign of peaceful activism through symbolic demonstrations.

02:04- 02:47 Interview talk about gika / inside Gika's family house

“The death of Gika influenced us a lot. He was a boy that put a beautiful energy within us. Climbing the Cheope Pyramid has been only the beginning of many activities in urban, historical and religious places. We started by climbing the pyramid and it has had a lot of success, we heard good feedback from the people. I am not speaking about the public’s opinion, but from the other activists.”

02:48- 03:18 VO actions: Saint Catherine

Three months ago, Mazen completed the first of his demonstrations, climbing the Haram Cheope, the great pyramid of Giza. Then, on April 6, for the seventh anniversary of the movement, he climbed the 1586 m of Mount Sinai including the 750 “stairs of penitence”. In the Christian, Muslim and Jewish traditions, Mount Sinai is where Moses received the Ten Commandments. Overcoming his physical limitations, Mazen reached the summit in order to raise awareness for the disabled population and to remember those who died for human rights in Egypt.

03:18- 05:12 climbing St Cathrine, reaching the summit

05:12- 05: 27 interview St. Cathrine

“I would like the world to be aware of what’s going on in Egypt. For this reason I climbed St Catherine mountain, where Moses spoke with his God, to bring his speech all around the world, and I am doing the same thing to make people care about the handicapped women, children, and society and in general human rights.”

05: 28 Mazen Screaming the name of “Gika”.

Other text (Arabic translation):

“When I found out that there were young people ready for revolution, I joined them for months to take down the regime, and change the system. After two years I feel that nothing has changed. We have a new president, but the same system, so I tried to be different.

I started to work with the movement by participating in demonstrations and other activities. When I found out about the 6th of April movement, I joined it immediately. I joined the movement on the anniversary of the clashes of Mohammed Mahmud. In the Moquattam group, I was just an activist, but after I became responsible for social policies. I joined many events, especially for handicapped people’s rights.”

I attend a lot of conference to spread their voices everywhere, and to raise awareness of the problems of disabled people.
I tried to see the system separately from religious or historic dogma. I would like the world to be aware of what’s going on in Egypt. For this reason I climbed St Catherine mountain, where Moses spoke with his God, to bring his speech all around the world. And I am doing the same thing to make people care about the handicapped, women, children, and society and in general human rights,

We have a problem with the system. Politicians don’t listen to our demands, but we will make them listen and change their policies to how young people want them.

I am a citizen who sees that people will soon organize themselves to bring a real change. Tomorrow will be better, but now we still need to spend a lot of energy, even if we already spent a lot. That’s why we are climbing St. Catherine mountain, we already climbed 2350 meters and we only have to climb 750 stairs. That is the fight with myself against the system and the entire world, and I will do more, or my efforts will be vane.

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A Story of a Syrian Village
Homs, Syria
By Smart Media
07 May 2013

Oyoun Hsain is a small village located in the northeastern countryside of Homs with a population of less than 4000 people.

The area was not subjected to either armed or peaceful revolutionary movements, but it fell victim to shelling and other destructive measures.

A massacre was on the verge of occurring, but the Free Syrian Army intervened and stopped it by evacuating the villagers away.

However, many people were killed due to the continuous shelling by warplanes, artillery and tanks from the battalion next to the village. Mercenaries also broke into the village several times and killed people. In addition to that, more than 120 people were kidnapped. Until this moment, nobody knows anything about what happened to those kidnapped people.

The film shows the destruction in the village after the evacuation of its inhabitants.

The buildings’ ruins embed the village’s memory, the people’s properties and their children’s food.

The film authenticates the story of the village. The film is a call for humanity sent to the neighboring villages, where mercenaries live in and still support the regime. It reminds them of the past years when they lived peacefully together; when all the sects in Syria lived in peaceful coexistence.

The film aims to wake up the remnant of humanity and mercy in neighbors’ hearts; the friends yesterday and the executioners today.

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Fracking Up Fares
Fares, Aswan
By zeer news
01 May 2013

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

In 2009, the company DANA GAS (UAE) started shale gas explorations near Fares, a small agricultural village on the West Bank of the Nile, 75 km North of Aswan.
The company employed a controversial technique known as hydraulic fracturing or "fracking", which uses a mixture of pressurized water and chemicals to release natural gas trapped in the shale rock. 
The village was soon flooded with groundwater and in January 2013 orchards, crops and houses were destroyed. 
Residents do not have results from the water tests that the government was supposed to carry out.  In addition to ecological concerns, property owners whose land was affected have received very little compensation from the gas extraction company (Dana Gas) or from the Egyptian government. The clean up efforts promised by the government have come to a halt and it is not known if and when they will resume. 

The case of Fares, however, differs from other documented cases of damages caused by fracking. 

The flooding is believed to be the result of seismic testings, a straightforward operation conducted prior to the extraction to determine the size of the shale. 

Therefore, this case shows:

  • how monitoring of the fracking operations --known to be possibly harmful for water reserves -- was poor or non-existent in an area close to the Nile

  • media usually focuses on fracking's direct effects. In Fares, however, damage was caused by a subsidiary effect of fracking

  •  land grabbing - although not through acquisition, but through destruction - occurred without compensation for the villagers and the denial of any responsibility on part of the company

  • the Egyptian government - under Mubarak, the SCAF, and the Muslim Brotherhood - failed to stand up against the company and protect its citizens

  • environmental concerns not only for the village's proximity to the Nile, but also for the destruction of many mature and rare trees

SHOT DESCRIPTION

00:00 - 00:17
Images of Upper Egypt, Map of Fares

VO: "75 km north of Aswan lies Fares, a village of 30,000 inhabitants, on the west bank of the Nile. Renowned as one of the principle producers of mangoes and dates in Egypt, the majority of Fares' residents are employed in the agricultural sector, making fields and crops the crux of the village's economy."

00:18 - 00:35 Images of the flooded fields, Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid

VO: "However, in January 2013, flooding of groundwater devastated fields and orchards, and destroyed houses and local buildings in the village. The flooding has been attributed to the hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, operations by the company Dana Gas, whose extraction site, is only 10 km north of Fares.

00:36 - 00:47 Animated info-graphic on fracking

VO: "Fracking is a controversial technique used to extract natural gas from shale rock. This is done by creating fissures in the shale with a perforating gun, and then injecting a pressurized mixture of water and chemicals to release the trapped gas and bring it to the surface."

00:48 - 01:19 Interview with the Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid (community leader), images of the fields

"It has started since 2009-- first they found that the soil became wet. Gradually, the water began to come on the surface, higher and higher, until it reached the level of one metre. This water has submerged about 2,000 feddans of land (840 hectares)."

01:20 - 01:26 Images of fields, uprooted palm tree

VO: Although the company is not fracking in Fares directly, the flooding is believed to be a result of Dana Gas's seismic testing using 'shot-holes'.

01:26 - 01:52 Animated info-graphic on seismic testing

VO: "Seismic testing uses 30 foot pipes that are inserted into the ground, and an explosion is detonated. The vibrations from the explosion bounce off the subsurface rock and travel back to the surface, where a grid of geophone sensors pick up the wavelengths, thus determining the expanse of the shale below. Ordinarily in the industry, the pipes are plugged in order to prevent flooding. But, these pipes were left open in the fields-- creating a pathway for flowing groundwater to stream upwards."

01:53 - 02:09 Images of fields, springs

VO: "The flooding reached a climax in January, but damage to the fields remains. Stagnant puddles of water exceeding 3 inches, cover entire fields. Groundwater continues to spring spontaneously, creating essentially a swamp out of homes and a formerly prosperous crop."

02:10 - 02:24 Interview with Mohamed Abdouh (farmer and teacher)

"Approximately about 150 families have to move, because of this problem. A lot of these families can't afford to build new houses."

02:25 - 02:36 Interview with Mohamed Abdouh, images of the local graveyard
"The most bitter thing for the villagers is that the graveyard of the village has completely submerged. "

02:37 - 03:06 Interview with Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid in front of a house destroyed

"Approximately 2,000 feddans were flooded by the groundwater. it is more than 2,000 feddans. In these areas there were trees: palms, lemon, mango, berries and that now there is water (that are now flooded). It has more than a hundreds of thousands of doom, palms, mangoes, lemons, and all citrus and this is all the income for the village. These fields are the only income for the village "

03:07 - 03:20 Images of residents

VO: Residents state that there was virtually no consultation with the village prior to shale extraction. In 2009, they were told there may be gas reserves in their village, but the seismic testing carried out directly on their land, was not explained to them.

03:21 - 03:44

"They just came and drilled. When the farmers asked them they told (them) they were looking for oil. So the farmers were happy. If they found gas or oil on your land, you will have a good compensation. Good money as a compensation."

03:45 - 03:52 Images of a street seller, men sitting on the ground, kid riding a donkey

VO: "The governor of Aswan stated that the company would create 450 jobs for local residents, yet no one has been employed to date."

03:53 - 04:06 Images of children, the local school, man picking up bricks

VO: "Moreover, compensation remains a large concern for the residents' livelihood. Beyond the municipal government offering to help rebuild the hospital and school, very little money has actually met the hands of the land and home owners whose properties were damaged."

04:07 - 04:34 Interview with Mohamed Abdouh

"When the villagers went to make a sit-in in the company-- in the site there- -the responsibles came and told us they have given the clerks in the municipal council a big number-- a lot of money. When we returned to the municipal council, they denied that. So we are... we don't know how. We are now bewildered between them…"

04:35 - 04:49 Images of the cleanup operation site.

VO: "The government began cleanup efforts six months ago by draining the fields with pipes that would empty to a drainage canal and then run back into the Nile. The pipes though, were too small, and so the clean up project had come to a halt. When they will resume is unknown."

04:50 - 04:59 Images of Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid, puddle of stagnant water, the Nile river from Fares' shore.

VO: "Residents still have not heard back from the municipal council abt the water test results, but maintain that the water is harmful, which is also a cause for concern due to its proximity to the Nile."

05:00 - 05:16 Images of Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid, images of resident walking next to trees, man on the train.

VO:
In addition to the ecological concerns, it's significant that Fares' principal fields and orchards were destroyed, including many mature trees that had reached peak production. Thus not only costing the agricultural-centered village lost profits this year, but also for the years to come.

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A Story of A Syrian Village
Homs, Syria
By Smart Media
01 May 2013

Oyoun Hsain is a small village located in the northeastern countryside of Homs with a population of less than 4000 people.
The area was not subjected to either armed or peaceful revolutionary movements, but it fell victim to shelling and other destructive measures.
A massacre was on the verge of occurring, but the Free Syrian Army intervened and stopped it by evacuating the villagers away.

However, many people were killed due to the continuous shelling by warplanes, artillery and tanks from the battalion next to the village. Mercenaries also broke into the village several times and killed people. In addition to that, more than 120 people were kidnapped. Until this moment, nobody knows anything about what happened to those kidnapped people.
The film shows the destruction in the village after the evacuation of its inhabitants.
The buildings’ ruins embed the village’s memory, the people’s properties and their children’s food.

The film authenticates the story of the village. The film is a call for humanity sent to the neighboring villages, where mercenaries live in and still support the regime. It reminds them of the past years when they lived peacefully together; when all the sects in Syria lived in peaceful coexistence.
The film aims to wake up the remnant of humanity and mercy in neighbors’ hearts; the friends yesterday and the executioners today.

Transcript:
00:47 This is Oyoun Hsain Al-Janoubiah with a population of 1700 to 2000 people

00:53 It was living a normal life with its neighbor villages, one of them is Al-Ameriah, Hsain Al-Shamaliah Oyoun Al-Dananeer and Al-Misherfih villages

01:01 The regime recruited these villages a long time ago to prevail the sectarian nature on the revaluation. We lived with them in peace and we had a cordiality relationships; real normal relationships

01:15 In the recent period, The Al-Ameriah people who were supported by Al-Asad gang. They were harassing the village all the time

01:24 They were threatening us by Dushka guns and Armed Ganges and striking us from near areas until they deported their own villages' people, then suddenly, and with no warning, they started to shell this small village

1:43 God is great, God is great, God is great!

01:51 Doesn't he have any mercy shelling us like? We don't have any guns. We don't have any thing. We don't have any weapons. We don't have anything

01:59 To take out our children from the debris. What did we do to him? Look at this. Have a look at how he shelled us. Look at that, people? Doesn't he fear God? What did we do to him ? What did we do? Look at that.

02:09 He destroyed the water tanks. He destroyed the lands, the windows, too. We have nothing anymore, nothing at all

02:16 This house, this house; he destroyed it above its people. The children and their mother were sitting here. They were sitting here, in this specific house. Does he need to pull it down on us? What did we do to him? The mercenaries came and stole the doors and the windows of the houses They left us nothing. They left us nothing. They stole everything.

02:26 What did we do to them? These are our houses. Destroyed, they are all pulled down

02:46 I couldn't take a Jar of Makdouse or olives from my house. I paid for this jar and preserve it to feed my children. He made me throw it away

02:57 This teapot, which I want to make tea with; I couldn't make tea for my children. He made me lose it

03:03 These are my children's clothes. Doesn't he fear God? What are these? These dishes, he broke these dishes to prevent us from eating or drinking, he wants to kill us. What is worse than that?

03:15 These lentils, I brought for my children and I couldn't take it with me

03:20 Doesn't he fear God to do that? Doesn't he fear God? What did we do to him?

03:26 My house, can I live in it now?

03:32 We called the free army, God bless them. They came and took out our children and wives and the old people. And we, the young people went with our wives and old people because we have nothing.

03:43 We don't have guns or weapons because we were living in peace. We were like a family.

03:47 The free army comes and asks us: what is the situation in here? We say, they are our family, our people, our brothers. Don't hurt them.

03:55 When the free army came we told them: don't harm them. They are our family, our brothers. We are living together, they wouldn't hurt us.

04:04 The free army goes. Until some day we went to beg the free army to ask them to take out our children and wives from the destroyed houses.

04:12 There were people sitting in here, people were sitting here. Imagine, people were sitting here, he shelled us with MiGs

04:19 Doesn't he fear God? I swear to God that is unbelievable

04:23 Look at that! We were sitting and watching TV. We were sitting, in the house here. Look at that, we didn't move anything.

04:32 Look at the glass. We were sitting peacefully. If the free army didn't come,

04:36 God bless them, God bless them, we wouldn't get out alive from here, we and our children and wives

04:41 And let them deal with the Asad gangs. We have nothing to do with them

04:45 We will come back to the village, against your will, against your will Asad gangs. We will come back to our village, God willing, with the free army's help.

04:55 The free army will bring us back to our village and protect us. We don't want your protection. We want the free army to protect us, because you betrayed us. We were with you, but you betrayed us.

05:05 You said the free army is armed gangs. They are not armed gangs. Now you are the armed gangs

05:10 You are shelling us with missiles. At least the armed gangs you were talking about is the free army, who is better than you. They didn't shell us with missiles. They took out our children from the debris, from the bricks. did you do for us? Tell me what did you do for us? You broke the electricity pedestals. These are your reforms?You are shelling us with cannons. Do it. Do it, we don't fear anyone but God.

05:31 We don't fear anyone but God. What do you have more? Do you have anything else to shell us with? You don't have any? Shell us, as much as you want.

05:45 My neighbors of the other sect. We sit together, eat the same food, drink the same water and we stay together. What did we do to them? Ask them, people, did we hurt them? We didn't hurt them, we didn't fight with them.

05:58 If they need anything, they come to me. If I need anything I go to them. What did we do to them? He destroyed our houses. He shelled us with cannons and tanks. What do we have to shell him back with? What do we have?

06:11 Where are the people? The people left are living in wild, under trees. Who is with us?Just us. Let him come to us. Let him come to kill us. What more does he have?

06:24 He shelled us with MiG, helicopters and exploding barrels. What these things are, we didn't know them before him. He threw barrels on us; cannons and tanks, he doesn't have anything else

06:35 He brought MiGs here to shell this store, MiG! A warplane! Squadron …Because we have? What makes him send a warplane? We have bomb action guns to fire on the Warplane. He sent the warplane, because we are making two hundred Syrian pounds a day.

06: 49 We thought that he has warplanes to fight Israel. He has it to fight us, Oyoun Hsain Al-Janoubiah village

06:56 Read this "Oyoun Hsain Al-Janouby school"

07:01 This school is for our children or not! Say that we are lying and this is not a school; that this is not a school. Is this a school or what? Whose this for? Isn't it for my children? Isn't it for my children?

07:14 Look at it, they shelled it. Look at it. They made holes in it

07:18 Have a Look inside it. They broke windows and doors. Have a look in here Look, This is the school, This is the school

07:54 "avant-garde promise""I promise in front of my classmates to be a perfect avant-garde -1" "To do my duty to the country, the party and the leader -2" to act according the law of the avant-garde and do good every -3"

"day "Directorate of Education in Homs" "Oyoun Al-Hsain Al-Janoubiah school C2" "first term exam 2006/2007" ":class" ":course" ":number" ":paper numbers" ":absence" ":corrector" ":checker" "Directorate of Education in Homs"

08:47 "Oyoun Hsain Al-Janouby school" "first circle"

08:50 Now, the shelling still going on in the village areas. So he shelled it with helicopters and MiG warplane. And he shelled the sensitive positions in this village.

09:03 He destroyed the mosques. He made them debris

09:07 He shelled the main water tank which nourishes the village with water and removed all life factors in it

09:33 We used to pray in this mosque, he destroyed it.

09:41 He destroyed this mosque; we were praying in it. He destroyed it by tanks

09:47 swear to God, he destroyed our mosque by tanks. Have a look, he destroyed all. We were praying in it

09:55 What were we doing but praying in here? He shelled us with cannon because we were praying? Doesn't he fear God? Don't you fear God? We were praying here. What were we doing? I swear we were praying here. Should you shell us with cannon because we were praying in here? Should you shell us with tank because we were praying? What are we doing against you?

10:22 There is a cannon near here, it's 130 caliber which is shelling the village constantly, also with tanks and mortars until it destroyed this village almost completely.

10:38 God is great, God is great. God is great, God is great. God is great - God is great.

10:53 Now there are no people in this village. Nobody lives in it but the resistor free army

11:32 Keep your head down

11:35 There is a tank over there. I hope that we hurt it. We attacked it last time. And there is a village over there. In the south, there is lots of mercenaries in it. There is a tank there, it attacks us, too. the cannons and the barracks are behind it

11:54 they are fortified and hiding

11:58 They made trenches

12:04 Of course we came in to take out the people. We took out all the people from the village to repel the Asad gangs who tried to make a Massacre in Oyoun Hsain village, I mean here in this village. We went in and took out all the people. Now we are sitting here in the front line to repel the gangs of the tyrant

12:28 He really is a tyrant

12:33 As you see, we are in the front lines, in rain, wind and cold weather. Thank God we are defeating them. God willing, they will not come forward any step here, God willing, we will go forward until we defeat him. Him and his mercenaries.

13:00 As you can see, here are our brothers. Here are our brothers

13:11 There is one hole, one sniper. You can come to see through the hole

13:27 They wanted to come in this small village to do a massacre here. Certainly nobody would know about this small village until a massacre takes place in it. Nobody knows about it so far. If a massacre took place in it, all people would know about it. We are a few in numbers who came in to take out the people

13:46 We have light weapons not big weapons, I mean small weapons. But thank God we made trenches. We are taking positions and can't leave this place at all because it's facing them.

14:04 We are completely facing them. So If we leave this place, they can come forward then as they have tanks, and they made trenches inside their area.

14:17 For what? We don't know

14:20 I hear you Abo-Abdo. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul. We are coming for you God damn your soul

14:40 Our neighbors are from the other sect; we are living together, eat same food and drink same water. We have nothing against them. He kept shelling us until he separated us and made it a sectarian issue. He is the one who made it like this. We were not sectarian people

14:55 He is shelling everyday. He calls for mercenaries to attack us. Why? What did we do to him? We don't want anything

15:02 We don't want anything anymore

15:07 Attack us. Leave, we don't want you anymore. We don't want you to stay in here

15:12 We are one family, we are neighbors. Our lands are next to yours. If the regime leaves or not, we are going to live together again. Don't think about it. Don't be drifted by the regime. Don't be drifted by the tyrant Bashar

15:25 Wake up, come back to your families, to your neighbors. We will be neighbors, families, forever.

15:32 He will do with you as he did with us. Don't think that he will leave you in peace. But we still one family

15:37 Wake up and go back to your village, to your people. I won't say more

Frame 0004
Transition
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 15 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) My name is Wissam and I'm from Syria, I'm a student of Journalism in my final year ...In Moscow The reason why I came to study in a country that lacks freedom of press is that Russia was the only country to give me a visa after I resigned. Oh, I forgot to tell you... I was an officer in the Syrian army

(VO) After the Syrian dictator Hafez al-Assad's death, his son Bashar inherited the power for that, the Constitution was amended, in the world's fastest assembly. The former Constitution demanded that the minimum age for being president should be 40 years of age. They've changed it for 34, the age of Bashar at the time I realized it was about time to write my resignation letter and leave Syria I didn't see my mom for the last 8 years I was afraid of visiting my family in Syria since an old friend from the army told me I was wanted
by the Syrian intelligence they've received a report from the embassy in Moscow saying I was against the regime I remembered my father at that point When I was a kid, he used to say: “The walls have ears” By that time, I didn't understand He lived 79 years in fear. When I was in the army, he advised me not to speak about the regime in front of other officers I used to find it funny, him worried about me, and then he told me: “These people are criminals, you didn't see what I saw” Once, he told me about an event so that I could understand his uncommon fear of the regime He told me how the army came and took one person from each house during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in 1980, in Aleppo They took around 100 people, among them children and elderly. It was a very difficult moment for my father, when he saw his childhood friends lined against the wall and get executed These crimes were called Al Mashariqa Massacre, named after the neighborhood where it occurred That's how Hafez al-Assad controlled the country for 3 decades, committing the worse massacres of these times The most famous of them was the Hama Massacre In this city, he killed dozens of thousands of civilians through shelling and artillery in 1982

(VO) In March 2011, the revolution began in Syria I realized then that the blood series started again The dictator inherited from his father not only the country, but also his criminality The difference this time was the will of the people, which had already changed with the generations The dictator used all means of intimidation, such as executions, torture and rape to eliminate the peaceful protests He counts on the support of loyal states, such as Iran and Russia, which provide him with weapons and hinder international resolutions against him But with the continuous bloodshed, people decided to take up arms and defend themselves After the liberation of wide areas in Aleppo, I decided to go back there where I grew up and from where I was away for a long time

(VO) This is the border of Bab al Salam, the security entrance which leads to Turkey

Bashar’s hired thugs, the “shabihha”, spent a long time in the region stealing The “Shabihha” used these offices to torment civilians A bunch of impolite people who got from the regime the power of making Syrian people’s lives unbearable

(Wissam says) But, thank God for the Free Syrian Army and free militias, we are free!

(Driver shout) Peace be upon you!

(VO) We entered Aleppo during the night to avoid the air strikes and snipers I was afraid, but my fears spread away when I saw the first FSA control station

(Militia) Peace be upon you! Where are you from?
(Driver) Aleppo (Militia) Where in Aleppo? (Driver) Al Jamiliyeh (Militia) Show me your documents (Driver) Here it is (Militia) Brother, could you show me your document as well? There are people trying to infiltrate during the night
(Driver) Ok, ok Did we arrive in Al Mushat already?
(Militia) It's Al Mushat! (Driver) We didn't realize because it's night We are part of your Tawhid Brigade
(Militia) Welcome! Honestly, it's because the regime infiltrated last week and took two of us
(Driver) Really? (Militia) Yes! Take care in Al Sinaa! The regime's snipers killed already 4 people there!

(VO) So much destruction made impossible for me to recognize the streets where I grew up The smell of blood replaced the fragrance of flowers
The sound of shelling took the place of birds singing The birds, just like the Syrian people, either died or ran away Young people lost their limbs in savage shelling I couldn't see any of this on Russian TV in 2 years of revolution World history doesn't know anyone who have killed its own people and destroyed its own country such as Bashar al Assad This fool overcame the madness of Nero burning Rome, and didn't spare women, children or elderly

(Wissam) This is an innocent 2year old child “Mig” bomber planes killed her parents and she was rescued by a civilian who brought her to a temporary hospital

(Wissam) Cluster bombs are still incubated. There it is. Bombs that didn't explode. It's a danger to every civilian who lives in this building, because inside there are dozens of bombs. It's internationally forbidden to use these bombs in populated areas. But this criminal regime doesn't see the difference between civilians and militaries. It points to residential buildings just to force people to leave Syria

(Wissam) This... We can hear the snipers, who’d target anyone that crosses the parallel street. They are based there, to the left. These are residential areas, which were abandoned because of the air strikes. Assad's snipers are on the top of the buildings. Anything that crosses their field of view will be targeted: children, women, and elderly... Even a dog or a cat!

(Wissam) Now we are in a building in Salah al Deen neighborhood and, because of the snipers, we are going to cross trough these wholes that the FSA opened. The fear of snipers forced these people to flee. Even they left their clothes behind. They left everything in the wardrobe. Here is a sniper shot. Looking down... Two more shots. And one here, through the glass. I can't continue, or a sniper will notice us.
This is a kitchen in a residence. They even targeted a kitchen... There are no terrorists here. It's a peaceful people's home.

(FSA soldier) Can you see him? (Wissam) I see! (FSA soldier) Do you want me to open the curtain a little bit? (Wissam) No, no, I see it! (Wissam) That's a mosque’s minaret in front of this house. There it is one, of them... There are many snipers based there. He shoots! He shoots, targeting civilians...

(FSA soldier) I'm an army deserter (Wissam) Why did you desert? (FSA soldier) Because of the injustice we presented (Wissam) Where did you serve? (FSA soldier) In Qatana's 10th platoon (Wissam) Did they order you to kill peaceful protesters? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) Or isn't it true? (FSA soldier) Of course, and they gave us pills... (Wissam) They medicated you? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) And the protesters? (FSA soldier) They'd put us in front of the protesters and told us to open fire. They didn't have permission to pass by. We wanted to protect the people, but we were only protecting a throne.

(VO) After all this, I arrived to my uncle's home. I wanted to surprise him with my visit. But I was the one surprised. The building was already empty. Aleppo is a historical city that the terror of the regime turned into a ghost city. People abandoned
their neighborhoods, leaving behind piles of pain and destruction that tears won't eliminate from
memory.

(Wissam) Did they shoot you in your leg? (Old man) They shot 4 times (Wissam) 4 times! (Old man) Russian shots AK-47 And what happened to you? (Old man) It’s broke! This bone here was shattered as well. Yes, it’s broke. (Wissam) Was it the Syrian army? (Old man) It was Bashar al-Assad's army! (Wissam) May God heal you! Who destroyed all this?

(Old man) It was his bombers and mortars, which invaded the Martyrs' street. We renamed it... (Wissam) Martyr's street? (Old man) We called it this way... (Wissam) Why Martyr's street? (Old man) Because during peaceful protests the regime opened fire and killed 14 civilians in here. The army sacked us, stole us, emptied our homes.

(Wissam) “Bashar's men passed here”... This school was used as a prison and headquarters. It was terrible for this neighborhood’s people.

(Wissam) “Scud” soviet missiles are sent from the capital, about a Km from Aleppo. Artillery and aviation are the means used to terrify the remaining population and force it to obey

(Boy) He attacked us with missiles, cluster bombs, “Mig” and “Shukhoi” airplanes...

(Woman) We came here because of Bashar. May he go to hell!

(Wissam) Why are you in this mosque? (Kid) Because of the bombings (Wissam) did you flee to the mosque because of the bombings?

(Wissam) What's your name? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) What? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) How old are you, Kifaa? (Girl) I'm seven years old (Wissam) Why do you live in the mosque? (Girl) They bombed our house

(VO) Terrifying the local population and destroying their homes, forcing people to flea the homeland: this is the regime's policy to try to eliminate the revolution.

(Refugee) The air force is bombing the Northern villages (Wissam) The air force? (Refugee) Yes (Wissam) Might God protect you! Is your family in Turkey?
(Refugee) Yes

Frame 0004
Transition (Part 1 of 2)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

PART 2: http://transterramedia.com/media/18536

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 26 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) My name is Wissam and I'm from Syria, I'm a student of Journalism in my final year ...In Moscow The reason why I came to study in a country that lacks freedom of press is that Russia was the only country to give me a visa after I resigned. Oh, I forgot to tell you... I was an officer in the Syrian army

(VO) After the Syrian dictator Hafez al-Assad's death, his son Bashar inherited the power for that, the Constitution was amended, in the world's fastest assembly. The former Constitution demanded that the minimum age for being president should be 40 years of age. They've changed it for 34, the age of Bashar at the time I realized it was about time to write my resignation letter and leave Syria I didn't see my mom for the last 8 years I was afraid of visiting my family in Syria since an old friend from the army told me I was wanted by the Syrian intelligence they've received a report from the embassy in Moscow saying I was against the regime I remembered my father at that point When I was a kid, he used to say: “The walls have ears” By that time, I didn't understand He lived 79 years in fear. When I was in the army, he advised me not to speak about the regime in front of other officers I used to find it funny, him worried about me, and then he told me: “These people are criminals, you didn't see what I saw” Once, he told me about an event so that I could understand his uncommon fear of the regime He told me how the army came and took one person from each house during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in 1980, in Aleppo They took around 100 people, among them children and elderly. It was a very difficult moment for my father, when he saw his childhood friends lined against the wall and get executed These crimes were called Al Mashariqa Massacre, named after the neighborhood where it occurred That's how Hafez al-Assad controlled the country for 3 decades, committing the worse massacres of these times The most famous of them was the Hama Massacre In this city, he killed dozens of thousands of civilians through shelling and artillery in 1982

(VO) In March 2011, the revolution began in Syria I realized then that the blood series started again The dictator inherited from his father not only the country, but also his criminality The difference this time was the will of the people, which had already changed with the generations The dictator used all means of intimidation, such as executions, torture and rape to eliminate the peaceful protests He counts on the support of loyal states, such as Iran and Russia, which provide him with weapons and hinder international resolutions against him But with the continuous bloodshed, people decided to take up arms and defend themselves After the liberation of wide areas in Aleppo, I decided to go back there where I grew up and from where I was away for a long time

Frame 0004
Transition (Part 2 of 2)
Syria
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 26 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) This is the border of Bab al Salam, the security entrance which leads to Turkey

Bashar’s hired thugs, the “shabihha”, spent a long time in the region stealing The “Shabihha” used these offices to torment civilians A bunch of impolite people who got from the regime the power of making Syrian people’s lives unbearable

(Wissam says) But, thank God for the Free Syrian Army and free militias, we are free!

(Driver shout) Peace be upon you!

(VO) We entered Aleppo during the night to avoid the air strikes and snipers I was afraid, but my fears spread away when I saw the first FSA control station

(Militia) Peace be upon you! Where are you from? (Driver) Aleppo (Militia) Where in Aleppo? (Driver) Al Jamiliyeh (Militia) Show me your documents (Driver) Here it is (Militia) Brother, could you show me your document as well? There are people trying to infiltrate during the night (Driver) Ok, ok Did we arrive in Al Mushat already? (Militia) It's Al Mushat! (Driver) We didn't realize because it's night We are part of your Tawhid Brigade (Militia) Welcome! Honestly, it's because the regime infiltrated last week and took two of us (Driver) Really? (Militia) Yes! Take care in Al Sinaa! The regime's snipers killed already 4 people there!

(VO) So much destruction made impossible for me to recognize the streets where I grew up The smell of blood replaced the fragrance of flowers The sound of shelling took the place of birds singing The birds, just like the Syrian people, either died or ran away Young people lost their limbs in savage shelling I couldn't see any of this on Russian TV in 2 years of revolution World history doesn't know anyone who have killed its own people and destroyed its own country such as Bashar al Assad This fool overcame the madness of Nero burning Rome, and didn't spare women, children or elderly

(Wissam) This is an innocent 2year old child “Mig” bomber planes killed her parents and she was rescued by a civilian who brought her to a temporary hospital

(Wissam) Cluster bombs are still incubated. There it is. Bombs that didn't explode. It's a danger to every civilian who lives in this building, because inside there are dozens of bombs. It's internationally forbidden to use these bombs in populated areas. But this criminal regime doesn't see the difference between civilians and militaries. It points to residential buildings just to force people to leave Syria

(Wissam) This... We can hear the snipers, who’d target anyone that crosses the parallel street. They are based there, to the left. These are residential areas, which were abandoned because of the air strikes. Assad's snipers are on the top of the buildings. Anything that crosses their field of view will be targeted: children, women, and elderly... Even a dog or a cat!

(Wissam) Now we are in a building in Salah al Deen neighborhood and, because of the snipers, we are going to cross trough these wholes that the FSA opened. The fear of snipers forced these people to flee. Even they left their clothes behind. They left everything in the wardrobe. Here is a sniper shot. Looking down... Two more shots. And one here, through the glass. I can't continue, or a sniper will notice us. This is a kitchen in a residence. They even targeted a kitchen... There are no terrorists here. It's a peaceful people's home.

(FSA soldier) Can you see him? (Wissam) I see! (FSA soldier) Do you want me to open the curtain a little bit? (Wissam) No, no, I see it! (Wissam) That's a mosque’s minaret in front of this house. There it is one, of them... There are many snipers based there. He shoots! He shoots, targeting civilians...

(FSA soldier) I'm an army deserter (Wissam) Why did you desert? (FSA soldier) Because of the injustice we presented (Wissam) Where did you serve? (FSA soldier) In Qatana's 10th platoon (Wissam) Did they order you to kill peaceful protesters? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) Or isn't it true? (FSA soldier) Of course, and they gave us pills... (Wissam) They medicated you? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) And the protesters? (FSA soldier) They'd put us in front of the protesters and told us to open fire. They didn't have permission to pass by. We wanted to protect the people, but we were only protecting a throne.

(VO) After all this, I arrived to my uncle's home. I wanted to surprise him with my visit. But I was the one surprised. The building was already empty. Aleppo is a historical city that the terror of the regime turned into a ghost city. People abandoned their neighborhoods, leaving behind piles of pain and destruction that tears won't eliminate from
memory.

(Wissam) Did they shoot you in your leg? (Old man) They shot 4 times (Wissam) 4 times! (Old man) Russian shots AK-47 And what happened to you? (Old man) It’s broke! This bone here was shattered as well. Yes, it’s broke. (Wissam) Was it the Syrian army? (Old man) It was Bashar al-Assad's army! (Wissam) May God heal you! Who destroyed all this?

(Old man) It was his bombers and mortars, which invaded the Martyrs' street. We renamed it... (Wissam) Martyr's street? (Old man) We called it this way... (Wissam) Why Martyr's street? (Old man) Because during peaceful protests the regime opened fire and killed 14 civilians in here. The army sacked us, stole us, emptied our homes.

(Wissam) “Bashar's men passed here”... This school was used as a prison and headquarters. It was terrible for this neighborhood’s people.

(Wissam) “Scud” soviet missiles are sent from the capital, about a Km from Aleppo. Artillery and aviation are the means used to terrify the remaining population and force it to obey

(Boy) He attacked us with missiles, cluster bombs, “Mig” and “Shukhoi” airplanes...

(Woman) We came here because of Bashar. May he go to hell!

(Wissam) Why are you in this mosque? (Kid) Because of the bombings (Wissam) did you flee to the mosque because of the bombings?

(Wissam) What's your name? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) What? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) How old are you, Kifaa? (Girl) I'm seven years old (Wissam) Why do you live in the mosque? (Girl) They bombed our house

(VO) Terrifying the local population and destroying their homes, forcing people to flea the homeland: this is the regime's policy to try to eliminate the revolution.

(Refugee) The air force is bombing the Northern villages (Wissam) The air force? (Refugee) Yes (Wissam) Might God protect you! Is your family in Turkey? (Refugee) Yes

Frame 0004
Dambe - Promo
Bamako, Mali
By Dearbhla Glynn
03 Apr 2013

This is the musical story of two talented Irish musicians covering thousands of miles
of stunning yet arduous terrain from Bamako in the south to the mysterious ancient
city of Timbuktu, from which point they enter the Sahara. The film captures Mali in
all its magic and beauty, celebrating culture and the power of music. This film is a
musical journey into Mali, West Africa. Renowned Irish musicians Liam O’Maonlaí
(The Hothouse Flowers) and Paddy Keenan (The Bothy Band) travel thousands of kilometers through Mali, to discover why it is known as the heart of Africa.

Frame 0004
Produced
Global
By U.S. Editor
02 Apr 2013

Repository of produced material

Frame 0004
Mook, The Teenage Thai Weightlifter
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
03 Mar 2013

Mook, 17, never imagined she could have a different life, away from ricefields and farming. Having lost her mother at the age of 9, she moved to Surin, one of the poorest provinces in Thailand, to live with her father’s family. She was then obliged to work in the fields, clean the house and look after her younger cousins. At 12, a friend of the family saw her strong body and suggested her to earn her life with weightlifting. She got a scholarship for the National Youth Team in Bangkok and started a new life. Now she gets a small salary and has a safe place to stay while she pursues her studies in high school.

Many children and youth from poor families in Thailand are sent to this kind of programmes to get a chance to study and earn some money. Most of them choose the traditional boxing, Muay Thai, but weightlifting is becoming more popular as some Thai female athletes have recently won some Olympic medals.

Frame 0004
Nigeria Youth Unemployment
Lagos, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
08 Feb 2013

The short documentary shows the everyday life of some Graduate youth in Lagos Nigeria who faces the daily challenges of unemployment and the hard economic situation in the country . Some of them narrated their experience with me and how they were able to find a means of livelihood for their self by been entrepreneur and how government as not fund the small business owners in the country.

Frame 0004
New Cut Real Democracy
Palestine
By Andy Beale
08 Feb 2013

Real Democracy is a vote donation program, organized by Israeli and Palestinian activists, and enacted through Facebook. The campaign allowed disenfranchised Palestinians to vote in the most recent Israeli Knesset elections through Israeli citizens who donated their ballot. Interviews were conducted with activists on both sides who organized the project, as well as Israeli Citizens, East Jerusalem Residents, and West Bank Residents who had heard about the initiative. The campaign signals the development of a new strategy in anti-occupation organizing in the region.

PTC
During the recent Israeli elections, a group known as Real Democracy used social media to reach across the green line, connecting anti-occupation activists in Palestine with supporters in Israel. Since Palestinians living outside the borders given Israel in 1948 live under Israeli military occupation but are not allowed to vote in Israel, Real Democracy organizers decided to use Facebook to give them a voice in the elections.

Quote: Shimri Zmeret
“So an Israeli goes on the Facebook page and posts a video or statement saying ‘I want to give my vote.' And a Palestinian goes on the same page and says ‘I will use your vote.’”

PTC
From the Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street, social media has played an increasingly important role in protest movements. Although Real Democracy organizers believe the campaign could have succeeded without Facebook, they say the social-media platform played a critical role in forging connections between activists who otherwise would have been unable to meet each other due to travel restrictions enforced by Israel.

Quote: Ameer Suleibi
“As Palestinians who live in the West Bank, they cannot enter Israeli area, because we don’t have permission, we don’t have declaration. My age is around 23, and I have never visited Jerusalem. So the best way in order to communicate with Israeli people or Arab people who live in Israel: by the Facebook or by Emails or by, ya3ni, by the internet.”

Quote: Shimri
“So, I can connect with a Palestinian through Facebook much more easily than I can go there because I can’t go to Ramallah and a Palestinian from Ramallah can’t come here.”

PTC
Activists argue that because the occupation has such a profound effect on Palestinian lives, they should be given the right to participate in the voting process.

Quote: Mousa
“The Israeli government, they have a plan to build an apartheid wall in our land, and to take much land from our side, and we are not allowed later to work in that land because it will be inside the wall.”

PTC
As the Israeli magazine +972 reported, one out of three people living under Israeli military control, including the residents here in the West Bank and Gaza, are not allowed to vote.

Quote: Haytham Tofukji
“But as I'm saying, here in Jerusalem, we are not allowed. I mean we are not allowed to be part of the elections, the Israeli elections, as we are residents. According to Israeli law, we are residents of Jerusalem.”

Quote: Shimri
“There's two reasons Israelis should give their votes to Palestinians. One is that Israel is undemocratic, and the second is that the UN is undemocratic. In the UN, the Israelis have the kind of ultimate power, if you want, the veto power, on their side but the Palestinians don't even have a vote in the General Assembly.”

PTC
Real Democracy organizers say several thousand people used the program. With a voter turnout of around 3.6 million this election, it's unlikely that this was enough to influence the elections, though activists say changing the outcome was never the point.

Quote: Haytham
“Maybe this project, if it continues—I'm not saying, because it's the first step—if it continues maybe it will reach a level with the goals of the idea.”

Quote: Mousa
“I believe, the small number, they will not do something. But, in fact, you know, we make a noise.”

PTC
Besides voting for a Knesset member, the Facebook page offered Palestinians the option of asking Israelis to boycott the election. Many Palestinian citizens of Israel who have voting rights boycott Israeli elections on principle.

Quote: Haytham
“For us as Palestinians, we don't consider the State of Israel. We consider Israel as occupation. So here is the point where you boycott them.”

Quote: Lamia Qaddoumi
“Like, any government to come after Benjamin Netanyahu, would be as racist and as dangerous as—as bad as the one before. So why care?”

PTC
Despite the ongoing occupation, many Israelis reject the idea that Palestinians living outside the green line should be allowed to participate in Israel's election process.

Quote: Eitan Bendor
“Because right now, they are the enemy. I mean, it's a big problem. Until you can get to a settlement that both sides can live up to it, then nothing can work. I mean, why should I give if you don't do anything in return?”

Quote: Mani Ben Yisrael
“Why should they donate their votes for Arabs? They don't need a state! You know, they are not a nation, whatever. They should go to Jordan, wherever they came from.”

PTC
Despite some negative feedback, members of Real Democracy say the response they received was overwhelmingly positive. They plan to continue using Facebook to build connections between activists and pursue a democratic solution to the region's problems.

Quote: Mousa
“My message now is to international governments, and that is the most important. My message to them is to make real action for our situation here, and to stop supporting Israeli occupation here.”

Final PTC: Wrap-Up

0:00 – 0:09 – establishing
0:10 – 0:32 – PTC B-Roll Facebook group for donating votes
0:33 – 0:45 – Interview with Co-founder of Real Democracy, Mousa Abu Marya
0:46 – 1:07 - Interview with Co-founder of Real Democracy, Shimri Zameret with B-Roll
1:08 – 1:27 – B-Roll, PTC, Narration
1:28 – 1:50 – Interview West Bank Resident, Ameer Suleibi with B-Roll
1:51 – 2:00 – Sound bite from Co-founder of Real Democracy, Shimri Zameret with B-Roll
2:01 – 2:10 – PTC
2:11 – 2:25 - Interview with Co-founder of Real Democracy, Mousa Abu Marya with B-Roll
2:26 – 2:37 – PTC with B-Roll
2:38 – 2:49 – Interview with Student, Haytham Tofukji, Al Quds University, resident of Jerusalem but not permitted to vote.
2:50 – 3:05 - Interview with Co-founder of Real Democracy, Shimri Zameret with B-Roll
3:06 – 3:19 – PTC with B-Roll
3:20 – 3:30 - Interview with Student, Haytham Tofukji, Al Quds University
3:31 – 3:37 - Interview with Co-founder of Real Democracy, Mousa Abu Marya with B-Roll
3:38 – 3:50 – PTC
3:51 – 3:58 - Interview with Student, Haytham Tofukji, Al Quds University with B-Roll
3:59 – 4:10 – Interview with Student, Lamia Qaddoumi, Al Quds University boycotting election with B-Roll
4:11 – 4:20 – PTC
4:21 – 4:35 – Israeli Citizen, Eitan Bendor, against Palestinians voting
4:36 – 4:47 - Israeli Citizen, Mani Ben Yisrael, against Palestinians voting with B-Roll
4:48 – 5:00 – PTC
5:01 – 5:18 - Interview with Co-founder of Real Democracy, Shimri Zameret with B-Roll
5:19 – 5:34 - Interview with Co-founder of Real Democracy, Mousa Abu Marya with B-Roll
5:35 – 5:40 - PTC

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Laolu Sebanjo Afromysterics Art
Abuja, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
01 Dec 2012

Name: Afromystrerics Art.

Journalist: Taiwo Adeleke

CUE:
A Nigerian born Artist and musician use his works of art to interpret the mystery of the African thought pattern and the weak economics situation in Nigeria from the fuel scarcity, crisis and killings , political power tussle and the challenges of Africa Artist at large. Images and soundbite of people at the art exhibition.

Headline:
Artist use his work of art to interpret the Economic situation in Nigeria and Africa at Large.

SLUG:
RAW-NIGERIA-ART

SYNTHE:
Timi Inekoba (Woman) Participant at the Exhibition
Stanley Ibansu (man) Business man Participant at the Art Exhibition
Laolu Senbanjo (man) Artist / Musician

SHOTLIST:

ABUJA, NIGERIA, NOVEMBER 30, 2012, AT THE ART EXHIBITION
ABUJA NIGERIA, DECEMBER 02, 2012 AT THE MUSIC CONCERT

VAR of a Artist drawing
VAR of Artist art exhibition in Abuja
VAR of people registering at the Art exhibition
VAR of Artist show casing his Art work to Audience
VAR of Artist playing is Guitar and singing to the audience
VAR of Artist Playing his music alone in the garden.
VAR of Artist at his music Concert in Abuja at the city park Abuja Nigeria

SOUNBITE:1 Timi Inekoba (Woman). Participant at the Art Exhibition ( English, 00:00:07:24 ). "My second favorite pieces is about the visual cycle, all the random things that as been going on in Nigeria, the subsidy things, the oil thing, the corruption thing is like he just recycle everything. Am pretty sure you know its art and music it comes together, so he translate everything from art to music , music to art. I think this will stand any were and its good. i like his art because its abstract, its beautiful, its something else,but i think it we go very far".

SOUNDBITE 2 : Stanley Ibansu (man) Business man Participant at the Art Exhibition. (00:00:51:17) "A picture speaks volume. i mean in thousand words , now pictures is in millions of words his art speaks millions of words , its mind blowing , i love what he does, most of what he as done envoy round the women fold , and all this while, why the event was going on i was thinking about why the women but you know discover that its actually the women its a woman world,everything involve around the woman , he has been able to, i had something very peculiar today somebody said that if you are able to change the woman, 80% of the challenges we have in the society is handle and that is the truth. What he is doing is affecting the women fold and i must tell you this is cutting across the change we expect and to tell you the truth he is making the impact that is needed with that ".

SOUNDBITE 3: Laolu Senbanjo (man) Artist / Musician. ( 00:00:47:08)
"My name is Laolu Senbanjo and am an artist and also a musician, my style of art is called Afromysterics art which simply means the mystery of Africa thought pattern, and what i do is hat i like to use my art to interpret different scenario and situations. I draw inspiration from methodology, symbols, Africa life, the Africa third pattern, everyday life and you know what we do is a narrative of a busy mind. An African mind is very busy is thinking of many things at the same time, so with this i try to tell you a lot of stories with just one picture, i take you through a story in a particular painting.

After having exhibitions outside the shore of Nigeria, i have been to few exhibitions am in a position to compare and contrast what the acceptance is like, you know you cant compare the monetary value in terms of appreciation in terms of the value of the artist itself. We in Africa, we need to do more , we need to value our artist and treat therm better because its sad to know that a lot of artist don't even have art galleries.

the major challenges is that of perceptive and understanding of what art is and a lot of people, like i tell people you don't pay an artist for his labour, he is not a laborer, you pay an artist for his site and ability to see what you cant see and put it in imagination on canvas ability to connect what is in your mind to your art. That is what people should value and that is priceless in the sense that when you see a work of art you see people price it like its a commodity like tomatoes and its very heart breaking sometimes the way we treat our own artist and this is something that is absence somewhere like i had exhibition in Germany , the artist are treated with respect and dignity and you know what ever costs a work is the value behind the work , basically you cant price art.

Afromysterics is going on loud , we are launching out and what we want is to take the message of our people , we want to take it to the world in charcoal something that the world have not seen, we want to take it out in a very unique manner, there is notting fetish or demonic about africa art, we should stop demonizing our history , our root because that is what saddens me the most , because most people see carving, mask , they start saying its as this and that , many people have been brain watched, and its painful , very very painful, i menthes are beautiful things that is been appreciated globally , this is what makes us unique, i mean while should be more European than an European, i mean he doesn't want to see the like of Michelangelo , Da vinci, of this world, i mean while not do what is natural to you , we have our styles of art , we have what cones to us naturally and the reasons while am doing this is that , this is what comes to me , this is what i feel, this is what i imagine and this is what am dreaming , i mean my art , i that is what am actually doing here i just sit down and let it flow that as been my life i let it flow."

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A Day Of Hope
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

She asks the government to find her husband saying, "Even if he's dead, give him to me, I want to bury him with my own hands."

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A Message For Bashar
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

A man with a message to the Syrian president asking him to release the Lebanese hostages in the Syrian prisons who've been there for almost 15 years.

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Congress General Secretary Rahul Gand...
Jammu, Kashmir, India
By newspoint
05 Oct 2012

Congress General Secretary Rahul Gandhi began his 2-day visit to Kashmir Valley amid growing differences among ruling coalition partners, National Conference and Congress, over empowerment of Panchayats in Jammu and Kashmir and continued threats to the grassroots representatives.
He will be bringing along a powerful business delegation that includes among others Ratan Tata and Kumar Manglam Birla. Rahul scheduled to attend the foundation stone laying ceremony of 6.5 km long Z-Morh Tunnel in Sonamarg. The foundation stone is laid by Union Minister for Roads and Transport Dr CP Joshi. The tunnel is aimed at providing all-weather connectivity with Ladakh.
he said adding that he extends hand to Omar Abdullah like Jawaharlal Nehru extended it to Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah for holistic and comprehensive development of Jammu and Kashmir. Rahul Gandhi referred to the relations between Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah and Jawaharlal Nehru and between Rajiv Gandhi and Dr. Farooq Abdullah adding that he wants to strengthen these relations and extends hand to Omar Abdullah in a similar way as Jawaharlal Nehru extended it to Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah.

Rahul Gandhi said that he is Kashmiri himself and wants to associate with the people of the State in resolving their difficulties.

Byte - Rahul Gandhi, Congress General Secretary

“I myself am from a Kashmiri family and want to have lifelong relations with the people of Jammu and Kashmir. I want to hear you, understand your problems and work for their redressal . Every State enjoyed share in the development process”.

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Red Light Districts: A Story About Pr...
Kolkata, West Bengal, India
By newspoint
29 Sep 2012

Sonagachi is one of Calcutta’s largest red light districts – narrow alleys, lined with small ‘apartments’ and corner stores form a confusing and nightmarish maze. The buildings lean into the street, the roads are crowded, it’s hot. The city seems to want to eat itself. Sonagachi is one of the very few places in India where women have a higher street profile than men. That’s because most of them are prostitutes. Approximately 9000 women, many of them trafficked into the country from Bangladesh or Nepal, work in Sonagachi. Around 60.000 more sex workers are active across Calcutta.

In overcrowded India things don’t come in small measures. Two and a half million women and
children (around 500.000 prostitutes in India are under 16) are working in the country’s sex industry.
More than 5 million people are already HIV positive. Governments, both local and national, do little
to tackle the increasing risk of a large-scale AIDS epidemic. Large red light areas like Sonagachi are
at the centre of a problem that may soon spiral out of control and affect millions of people in Bengal
and the neighbouring state of Bihar. Sex workers are socially shunned and prostitution is illegal,
which makes the women in Sonagachi extremely susceptible to extortion, blackmail, rape or murder
by local gangsters, pimps and the police.

Byte: Sudeshna Basu Mukharjee, Sociologist

Byte: Pinki, Sex worker

“I am living at this place as a mother no one wants to live. I want to make my children’s future bright , When we’ll get older then our children will not going to support us.”

Byte: Juhi Tamang, Teacher

“My mother does not want me to join this field. Till the time I can do work hard, I’ll do.”

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WHAT'S HAPPENING IN BEIRUT, SYRIA, EG...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
23 Sep 2012

Hundreds of Lebanese gathered in downtown Beirut Friday, September 21, 2012 to protest the recent insults on the Prophet Mohammed seen in the infamous trailer posted on Youtube, as well as the cartoons in the French publication Charlie Hebdo.

Rebels shoot down government planes, but not quickly enough to stem the flow of refugees to the Turkish border.

Egypt's Supreme Administrative Court ordered the dissolution of Egypt's lower house of parliament based on a prior verdict ruled last June that the elections law that allowed voting-in of parliament members was unconstitutional.

Pro-reform protesters calling for the release of political activists march from King Hussein Mosque in Amman, Jordan, after Friday Prayer.

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Editor's Picks 13 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
12 Sep 2012

Demonstrations continue in front of the US Embassy in Cairo, with clashes breaking out between police and protesters including a constant volley of smoking tear gas canisters. Bahraini religious figures protest as well, though keeping their demonstration non-violent. About a hundred Tunisians protested on Wednesday, September 12, in front of the US Embassy, shouting anti-American slogans and burning American flags.

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Editor's Picks 5 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
04 Sep 2012

Morsi calls for Assad to step down
Morsi meets with Norwegian Foreign Minister
Attack on Uthman Pasha School
Eviction & Destruction of homes in Cambodia, making way for development.

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The Will Of Maickel
Caracas, Venezuela
By @LatAmSight
15 Aug 2012

Maickel Melamed was born in 1975 with a physical motor deficiency. In 2011 he ran the New York marathon. This year he will run in Berlin. Maickel has run five marathons in four years, when just one was supposedly impossible.

Maickel training indoors, B Roll:

“En ese momento cuando crees que no, es donde sigues. En ese momento donde todo te dice oscuridad, es donde tú crees en la luz así no la veas. Todo lo contrario: cuando no ves la luz, es cuando más la atraes."

“In that exactly moment when you think you can’t make it, you just have to keep going. That moment where everything says dark, is where you believe in light, even if you cannot see it. When you can’t see the light, is when you most attract it.”

Maickel training outdoors:

“Si a mí me dijeron que yo no iba a vivir, me dijeron que yo no iba a caminar, me dijeron que yo no iba a subir montañas, me dijeron que yo no iba a hablar bien y soy conferencista desde hace más de diez años.”

“I was told that I would die, that I would never walk, that I would never climb a mountain that I would never talk properly, and I have been speaking in lectures for more than 10 years.”

Maickel Melamed:

“A cada no le fuimos poniendo un sí, y ese es el sí que le queremos regalar a cada ser humano.”

“Instead of NO we say YES, and that YES is our gift to every single human being.”

Maritza de Melamed, Maickel's mother:

“Él, como dice su papá, como que se prueba y a la vez es algo como una función que él tiene una cosa que él tiene como un deber, cómo te puedo decir yo, como algo así que él mismo se lo ha propuesto.”

“He, as his father says, he (Maickel) tests himself, and at the same time it is like a duty he must accomplish, as I can tell you, he meets what he proposes.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Sentía que cada vez que yo hacía algo, que me llevaba más allá de mis propios límites, los límites de mi entorno también se expandían, entonces entendí que eso era quizá la diferencia que yo tengo para aportar.”

“I was feeling that every time that I’ve achieved something that took me beyond my limits, my limits were expanded as well, then I think that maybe that is the difference with what I have to give.”

Maickel training outdoors, B Roll:

“Y vivimos buscando nuestra diferencia y yo creo que esa es nuestra búsqueda primaria cuál es nuestra diferencia."

“We live looking for that which makes us different, I believe that this is our main basic quest, what sets us apart.”

Mr. and Mrs. Melamed, B Roll:

“Yo le diría a todos esos padres que tienen una situación como la que se me presentó a mí, de que..."

“I would to like say all those fathers who have a situation as I've been presented with Maickel, that...”

Alberto Melamed, Maickel's father:

“esos muchachos vinieron a esta vida por algo, y nosotros estamos en la obligación de darles todo el cariño y todo el apoyo que podemos darles para poderlos sacar adelante.”

“...this guy came into this life for something, and we are under the obligation to give them all the love and care, and all the support that we can, to keep them moving forward by themselves.”

Crossing the finish line, NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Maickel training, B Roll:

“El entrenamiento es muy intenso, son seis días a la semana, aproximadamente tres horas y media diarias a veces más, hay largos de ocho horas y media de entrenamiento.”

“Training is quite intense, six days per week, almost four hours per day, but sometimes we reach almost nine hours.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Es un entrenamiento muy intenso diseñado específicamente para mi persona, cada ser humano es diferente.”

“Is a very tough training, specially designed for me, every human is different.”

Photos:
“Esto es dedicado a todos esos seres humanos que tienen esos sueños adentro y que están esperando una chispita para despertarlos e ir en búsqueda de ellos.”

“This is dedicated to those human beings that have dreams, for those who are waiting for something to spark their life, wake up and go for it.”

End of NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Short Documentary
Country: Venezuela
Director: Placido Garrido
Editorial Producer: Alvaro Mendoza Saad
@LAtAmSight 2012

Restrictions: Featured and licensed by TELEMUNDO to all American continent (from Patagonia, Argentina to Alaska, USA)

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Indonesia trains surfing
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Anne DELAISTRE
10 Aug 2012

Indonesia lowers power lines to deter trains surfers

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Delhi's Urban Crisis -- Growing Waste...
Delhi, India
By bajpairavi
05 Jul 2012

Indian capital Delhi and its satellite towns have nearly 23 million residents, making it the world’s second most populous metropolitan region. Its population is growing at a phenomenal pace, demanding a commensurate increase in infrastructure support to keep the city livable. But the rate of development is lagging behind.

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"Living the Love" - Documentary about...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
By Gloria Kurnik
08 Feb 2012

In depth portrait of the Hindu Thaipusam festival held annually in Malaysia in January. A unique take on the events through the eyes of a participating couple.
This short documentary is produced in a "personal journey" or "character driven" style.

Synopsis:
Piercing the body out of faith is a custom in most of the oldest religions. Though it may induce fear, doubt and anxiety, it is also associated with a certain sense of mysticism and spirituality. The viewer witnesses here the Thaipusam - the magical Hindu festival where devotees in a state of trance, painlessly carry offerings in the form of heavy burdens and/or have a range of intriguing attachments hooked to their body.

But beyond the images of unbelievable crowds and fanfare, the viewer can also witness the love, trust and devotion merging into an expression of faith through self-sacrifice.

For many, Thaipusam is all about the flourish and the obscure customs. For many tourists, it is the defining evidence of the unique multi-cultural life in Malaysia. For many amateur photographers, it’s one of those places where you capture that ‘one’ unforgettable picture. For some it's a story of love...

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If You Eat Garlic, You Will Get Full
Heraat, Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
11 Jan 2012

This film features the miserable life of a group of children in the western city of the Heraat province of Afghanistan by showing their work on the streets of the city.

More importantly, it shows the ill behavior of the residents of the city toward these kids. The film shows how they are treated as outcasts in the society, with people not allowing them in the sports fields, shops, and so on.

The film is ten minutes long.

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It's in your Eyes
USA & Korea
By quechuafilms
15 Apr 2011

There are things that make us hesitate, moments in our lives that scare us. For guidance in such instances, we look to the people closest to us. But sometimes they aren’t there. We speak to them, but only in questions. What happens when we realize our own inner thoughts are the only answers we have?

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TTM Documentaries
Beirut, Lebanon
By Beirut Editor's Picks
24 Sep 2010

TRANSTERRA is becoming more than just a marketplace where producers can showcase and sell their documentaries. We are a resource for archive footage, and a community that provides collaboration opportunities.

The documentaries shown here are part of TRANSTERRA's greater catalog of options. Full-length screenings are available for most, and you can access these by sending an e-mail request to [email protected].