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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (5 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Children playing with the Lelo Barti ball inside a church before the game starts.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (6 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Local orthodox priest (center) carrying the Lelo Barti ball to the village center a few minutes before the game starts.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (11 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Male residents of the village of Shukhuti in Georgia fighting over a 16-kilogram leather ball during the traditional Lelo Barti game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (10 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Male residents of the village of Shukhuti in Georgia fighting over a 16-kilogram leather ball during the traditional Lelo Barti game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (9 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Male residents of the village of Shukhuti in Georgia fighting over a 16-kilogram leather ball during the traditional Lelo Barti game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (8 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Male residents of the village of Shukhuti in Georgia fighting over a 16-kilogram leather ball during the traditional Lelo Barti game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (12 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Male residents of the village of Shukhuti in Georgia fighting over a 16-kilogram leather ball during the traditional Lelo Barti game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (24 of 47)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Players rest during a game.

A day when the rest of the orthodoxies celebrate Easter every year at home around the dinner table, a small village Shukhuti in western Georgia fights in an ancient game called Lelo. Men from upper and lower parts of the village participate in several hour battle for 16 kg weighing Lelo Burti ball. Whatever part of the village brings the ball to its side, what is marked by two rivers, – wins. Victory means a glory and following Lelo’s main tradition, the winners carried the ball to the cemetery and place it on the last died player grave. (Full article is available).

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (7 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Male residents of the village of Shukhuti in Georgia fighting over a 16-kilogram leather ball during the traditional Lelo Barti game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (22 of 47)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Local residents from lover and upper parts of the Shukhuti village fight for a 16 kg Lelo ball.

A day when the rest of the orthodoxies celebrate Easter every year at home around the dinner table, a small village Shukhuti in western Georgia fights in an ancient game called Lelo. Men from upper and lower parts of the village participate in several hour battle for 16 kg weighing Lelo Burti ball. Whatever part of the village brings the ball to its side, what is marked by two rivers, – wins. Victory means a glory and following Lelo’s main tradition, the winners carried the ball to the cemetery and place it on the last died player grave. (Full article is available).

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (14 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Player greeting a teammate after a good pass during a Lelo Barti game in Shukhuti, Georgia.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (13 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Player resting during a Lelo Barti game in Shukhuti, Georgia.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (18 of 47)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Local residents from lover and upper parts of the Shukhuti village fight for a 16 kg Lelo ball.

A day when the rest of the orthodoxies celebrate Easter every year at home around the dinner table, a small village Shukhuti in western Georgia fights in an ancient game called Lelo. Men from upper and lower parts of the village participate in several hour battle for 16 kg weighing Lelo Burti ball. Whatever part of the village brings the ball to its side, what is marked by two rivers, – wins. Victory means a glory and following Lelo’s main tradition, the winners carried the ball to the cemetery and place it on the last died player grave. (Full article is available).

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (15 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Male residents of the village of Shukhuti in Georgia fighting over a 16-kilogram leather ball during the traditional Lelo Barti game.

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An Ancient Tradition of Lelo (16 of 20)
Shukhuti, Georgia
By Arturas Morozovas
05 May 2013

Players helping an injured teammate during a Lelo Barti game in Shukhuti, Georgia

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (13 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel owner Mustafa Akgun tries to coax a reluctant
camel into a truck in order to be transported to a competition in nearby town of Pelitkoy in the Aegean region of Turkey, where camel wrestling is popular.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (14 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Burhaniye, Turkey-- January 26, 2013-- Adolescent camels brought from Iran are being raised for sale at a stable in Burhaniye, Turkey.

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CAMEL WRESTLING IN TURKEY
Istanbul, Turkey
By Mais Istanbuli
02 Feb 2013

Both a tourist attraction and a local pastime in Turkey, camel wrestling is a time-old competition celebrated annually nearly every weekend in the Aegean region from November until March. The tournaments traditionally coincide with the olive harvest. Some camel owners explained that in the past, camels were used to help transport the fruit from the orchards. The biggest and most popular camel wrestling festival is held in Selcuk, near the ancient Greek ruins of Ephesus.

On one cool morning, Mustafa Can led a stubborn camel to be loaded onto a waiting truck. From the stable in the Aegean coast town of Burhaniye, a dozen camel were being transported to nearby Pelitkoy, where an annual camel wrestling tournament is held. Villagers and fans packed into stadium chairs, set up barbecue grills and tables in truck beds surrounded the arena in order to enjoy the action. The annual camel wrestling tournament is the most exciting day of the year in Pelitkoy, and everyone from the local mayors, to farm workers, to Roma musicians, have crowded around a small arena to watch the action. More than 100 camels and their owners from all over the region converge to practice the sport which is Turkish is called "deve guresi" and is believed to have brought to Turkey more than 2000 years ago.

Two by two, the massive and highly decorated animals, wearing elaborate hand-embroidered saddles, and draped with red banners reading "mashallah" were escorted by their owners into the ring, bells ringing. Frothing at the mouth from excitement and anxiety, the animals jostle with their opponents, trying to pin their opponent's neck to the ground while their owners yell word of encouragement.

"Camels are very sensitive, like a child," says Savran, a camel trainer from Burhaniye. "You should really understand them." He explain that trainers get to know each camel's voice and the camel, likewise, know's that of his trainer.

As white streams of saliva draw zig zags through the air, two teams of camel handlers stand close by. In case the fighters get too serious, they are ready to use ropes to separate the 1000-1500 kilo animals named after fast cars, like Audi, or beautiful places, like Florida, or fighters, like Crazy Ozel.

Fights end after 10 minutes. A winner is declared if one camel forces the other to the ground, or if one camel walks away from battle, forfeiting the match. The level of violence is low compared to other animal fighting sports, though a few camels ended up with nose-bleeds. Oftentimes, no winner is declared. That seems of little importance to the crowd, though, many of whom are busily grilling camel sausage and drinking raki, Turkey's anise-flavored brandy. The crash of a drum, accompanied by wild clarinet playing and violin is reason enough for some of the men to dance, while others enjoy smoking water pipes.

These days, most camels are imported from Iran-- including a half-dozen soft, big-eyed juveniles who are for sale in Burhaniye. A good fighting camel is worth as much as $15,000, but most owners say their camels are not for sale.

"We don't drive luxury cars," says a camel owner named Akin. "We don't drive a good car, but we have a good camel."

As the clear afternoon began turning to dusk, the tournament concluded with a camel procession through the town. Then the camel owners began again the arduous process of coaxing the animals into the truck beds. The following weekend would see yet another camel tournament in a different Aegean town.

  • Jodi Hilton
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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (15 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camels compete during a wrestling tournament held in the village of Pelitkoy in the Aegean region of Turkey.

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Iraq lost the Gulf Cup and millions f...
Bahrain
By AlFardan
19 Jan 2013

Iraq lost the gulf cup and millions for UAE players

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Nepal Bullfight (1 of 6)
Nuwakot, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
14 Jan 2013

A bullfight competition organized in Taruka, Nuwakot 80 km north of the capital Kathmandu on January 14, 2013. The bullfight competition is organized every year at Maghe Sankranti.

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Nepal Bullfight (2 of 6)
Nuwakot, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
14 Jan 2013

Photo taken on January 14 shows hundreds of Nepalese coming to Taruka Nuwakot 80 km north of the capital Kathmandu to see the bullfight competition. The bullfight competition is organized every year at Maghe Sankranti.

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Nepal Bullfight (3 of 6)
Nuwakot, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
14 Jan 2013

Photo taken on January 14 shows a man trying to escape an uncontrolled bull in the competition at Taruka Nuwakot 80 km north of the capital Kathmandu. The bullfight competition is organized every year at Maghe Sankranti.

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Nepal Bullfight (4 of 6)
Nuwakot, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
14 Jan 2013

A man gets injured during the bullfight competition at Taruka Nuwakot 80 km north of the capital Kathmandu.

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Nepal Bullfight (5 of 6)
Nuwakot, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
14 Jan 2013

A bullfight competition organized in Taruka, Nuwakot 80 km north of the capital Kathmandu. The bullfight competition is organized every year at Maghe Sankranti.

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Engineers Present Their Inventions on...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
02 Sep 2012

Egyptian engineers and engineering students presented their inventions in the 11th session of the Egyptian Engineering Day, held by the IEEE GOLD Egypt (Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers) on September 2nd and 3rd at a large exhibition hall in Cairo, under the auspices of Egypt’s Prime Minister Hesham Kandil.

The annual two-day exhibition is a chance for creative young Egyptian engineers to introduce their innovations to the field of industry and make use of their creative graduation projects to be utilized.

The EDD is held this year under the slogan “Egypt Moves Forward.”

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Eng. Mohamed Yousri, member of the EDD Executive Committee:
“The Egyptian Engineering Day is an exhibition for projects. Through competitions, students present their projects and we bring in the industrial sector. We make a link between the engineering and the industrial sectors so that these projects and great innovations can be used in the field of industry.”

The creativity of the young engineers impressed the visitors.

Some engineers presented a project of water-fuelled vehicles as an alternative for gas-fuelled cars, avoiding the pollution of gasoline and finding a renewable source of fuel.

Others manufactured their own racing cars, although Egypt doesn’t manufacture cars.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Eng. Michael Sidney, fresh graduate, Ain Shams University:
“Our graduation project is to manufacture a formula racing car and use it by participating in a race in England called ‘Formula Students’. We travelled this year and we scored the 11th place worldwide. We faced many issues as Egypt doesn’t manufacture cars and we had to design and manufacture our racing car. Some parts were difficult to get, as they are not manufactured in Egypt such as the engine, which we got from a racing motorbike. Apart from this, we designed and manufactured all the car components here in Egypt.”

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mahmoud, Engineering student, Tanta University:
“Our graduation project is the water fuelled car. It is a car operating by water instead of gas due to the issues in the gas such as the pollution. We started searching for an alternative for the gasoline, and we find that the hydrogen is the best, which supplies three times the energy we get from gasoline. We started making electrical analysis in the water using a battery with water and applying 12 volts. It results in HHO gas that goes through the combustion engine through a flash arrestor to protect from backfire in the system so that the system is safe and secure.”

There are many other inventions such as the ROV or the Remotely Operated Vehicle which can be used as a spying robot under the far depth of water, lamps turning on and off by moving hands above, smart electric meters, etc, all designed and created by young Egyptian engineers.

The IEEE says that the EED is a symbol for the transitional stage of engineering and technology in Egypt.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 3, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 3, 2012
Length: 0:03:08
Video Size: 155 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS
SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, the hall in Cairo where the inventions are displayed
2. Close up, an engineer wearing a T shirt written on it “EDD, Egyptian Engineering Day 2012”
3. Close up, an engineer wearing a T shirt written on it the slogan “Egypt Moves Forward”
4. Medium shot, crowds of visitors watching the innovations of the fresh engineers
5. Medium shot, a sign reading “IEEE” (The Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers)
6. Pan left, a miniature model for the Future City designed by an Egyptian fresh graduate engineer
7. Medium shot, an engineer showing visitors turning a lamp on and off remotely by moving his hands above it
8. Wide shot, crowds of visitors
9. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Eng. Mohamed Yousri, member of the EDD Executive Committee:
“The Egyptian Engineering Day is an exhibition for projects. Through competitions, students present their projects and we bring the industrial sector. We make a link between the engineering and the industrial sectors so that these project and great innovations could be used in the field of industry.” 10. Pan right, visitors and engineers at the hall
11. Medium shot, a sign reading “Hydrogen-Car Fuel Injection Control”
12. Tilt down, a diagram and a monitor showing how a water fuelled car works
13. Various shots of a racing car designed by an Egyptian engineer
14. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Eng. Michael Sidney, fresh graduate, Ain Shams University:
“Our graduation project is to manufacture a formula racing car and use it in participating in a race in England called ‘Formula Students’. We travelled this year and we scored the 11th place worldwide. We faced many issues as Egypt doesn’t manufacture cars and we had to design and manufacture our racing car. Some parts were difficult to get as they are not manufactured in Egypt such as the engine, which we got from a racing motorbike. Apart from this, we designed and manufactured all the car components here in Egypt.” 15. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mahmoud, Engineering student, Tanta University:
“Our graduation project is the water fuelled car. It is a car operating by water instead of gas due to the issues in the gas such as the pollution. We started searching for an alternative for the gasoline, and we find that the hydrogen is the best, which emerges three times the energy we get from gasoline. We started making electrical analysis to the water using a battery with water and applying 12 volts. It results in HHO gas that goes through the combustion engine through a flash arrestor to protect from backfire in the system so that the system is safe and secure.” 16. Medium shot, a sign reading “ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle”
17. Medium shot, crowds of visitors and a group of young women at the hall
18. Various shots of the inventions presented by Egyptian fresh engineers
19. Pan right, crowds of visitors at the exhibition hall

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Bolivian Female Wrestlers
Bolivia
By U.S. Editor
03 Jun 2012

In the last ten years, increasing numbers of indigenous woman have taken to wrestling in the outskirts of La Paz, fighting back against the dominant culture of machismo and discrimination.

Yolanda La Amarosa flies through the air in a swirl of gold lamé and petticoats, her calves clamped around the throat of her unfortunate opponent. He spins across the ring to land in a sprawl on the canvas, hand pressed against his lower back, face set in a grimace of agony. Quieres mas, cabron? Yolanda cries as she strides over and kicks him in the back of the head. There’s a ripple of applause and laughter from her fellow wrestlers, who are hanging on the ropes, waiting their turn to practice the same sequence.

The ring is set up in a junkyard on the outskirts of El Alto, a sprawling migrant city that was once just a suburb of La Paz, the capital of Bolivia. The wrestlers are training on torn mattresses atop wooden planks. It’s late afternoon and the sun dips quickly behind the peaks of the altiplano. At well over 4000 metres, the air is thin and freezing. As the session ends, Yolanda puts her bowler hat on at a jaunty angle, sits on a pile of bricks and asks me, que quieres saber…?

Yolanda Veraluz was one of the first cholita luchadores in Bolivia. Like almost all her fellow female wrestlers, she’s indigenous Aymara – a descendant of the Tiahuanaco culture that predated the Inca. Women started wrestling in Bolivia in the nineties, going head to head with the men. In a country where machismo is almost a reflex, the cholita luchadores have become a symbol of female empowerment – a fact of which Yolanda is all too aware. “We’ve shown that women don’t have to accept discrimination and humiliation… that a woman can speak with the same voice as the man. She has the same rights as her husband – to study, to work, to get ahead.”

Once derogatory, the chola moniker has become a source of pride. In October 2011, many of the top cholita wrestlers broke away from the main wrestling organization, Titanes del Ring, which was dominated by one man, Juan Mamani. Disillusioned with Mamani’s autocratic approach, they set up an independent association and are going it alone. "Juan Mamani stole our money," says Yolanda. "But we realized that we don't need him. We can do this ourselves."

Populist president Evo Morales has been a vocal champion of Bolivia's predominantly poor indigenous population - in particular its women. In 2010, he put together a cabinet that was evenly split between genders and which included three indigenous women. There are now signs of an emerging indigenous middle class in the capital La Paz. “Five years ago, we were looked down upon – we used to just wait on the rich,” Yolanda tells me. “But now, thanks to our President, we’re working in banks, in offices and even in government.”

Multimedia Piece Available Here:
http://transterramedia.com/media/15848

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Made in Bangladesh
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By U.S. Editor
10 Apr 2012

Bangladesh’s garment industry, responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports, employs an estimated two to three million people, 80% of which are women, in over 4,000 factories all over the country. Although violating national law, some suppliers still employ children under the age of 14. Workers, reliant on their wages to support their families, are highly underpaid; most people earn approximately 1,500-2,000 Taka (15 - 20 Euros) per month while working 12 hour days, 6 days a week.

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Made in Bangladesh (5 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Child labor in Bangladesh's garment industry. In a hot and dusty room kids package jeans for export.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.