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Toxic Waste Trade 16
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
26 Nov 2014

A statue, the Monte Carlo of Leipzig as people call it, looks over New Lakeland. Right next to it, the central dump Cröbern, is one of Europe's biggest toxic waste dumps.

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Toxic Waste Trade 01
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

The BMG/SVG Naundorf "waste treatment plant" received over 40,000 tons of dangerous waste from the central Cröbern dump. There is to this day no trace the toxic waste said to have been re-routed there.

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Toxic Waste Trade 02
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

A member of local citizens' initiative who has filed a criminal complaint against S.D.R. Biotec has been fighting to expose and punish of the waste trade in the region for years. A farmer since 1991, in the former GDR he worked as an electronic engineer. He now keeps up the farm belonging to his parents.

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Toxic Waste Trade 03
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An archive photo belonging to a former worker at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch shows how highly poisonous rubbish was simply mixed with sludge and other substances and relabeled.

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Toxic Waste Trade 04
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

A sign in Pohritzsch reads, "We welcome you to Saxony.“

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Toxic Waste Trade 06
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

A 55 year-old former worker at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch worked there from 2002 to 2012. He now suffers from Polyneuropathy, because he had been exposed for years to heavy metals (i.a. lead and mercury). He remembers relabeling the waste and loading it up on the trucks which brought it to the dumps.

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Toxic Waste Trade 07
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

The BMG/SVG Naundorf "waste treatment plant" received over 40,000 tons of dangerous waste from the central Cröbern dump. There is to this day no trace the toxic waste said to have been re-routed there.

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Toxic Waste Trade 08
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

A member of local citizens' initiative who has filed a criminal complaint against S.D.R. Biotec has been fighting to expose and punish of the waste trade in the region for years. A farmer since 1991, in the former GDR he worked as an electronic engineer. He now keeps up the farm belonging to his parents.

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Toxic Waste Trade 09
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

Sheep graze next to S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch. The waste treatment plant lies right next to cultivated fields, orchards and seemingly idyllic private houses.

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Toxic Waste Trade 10
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

The S.D.R. Biotec waste treatment plant in Pohritzsch is closed now. A local citizens' initiative filed a criminal complaint that led to charges of particularly serious environmental crimes. Until now, no verdict has been issued.

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Toxic Waste Trade 11
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

Orchards cover the land near S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch. The waste treatment plant lies right next to cultivated fields, orchards and seemingly idyllic private houses.

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Toxic Waste Trade 12
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

Delitzsch is a small town along the railroad line near Pohritzsch.

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Toxic Waste Trade 13
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

A 67 year-old inhabitant of Pohritzsch has been working for many years in Munich since he fled the GDR. After the fall of the Wall, he came back to East Germany and built a house in Pohritzsch. He is paraplegic.

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Toxic Waste Trade 14
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An archive photo belonging to a former worker at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch shows how highly poisonous rubbish was simply mixed with sludge and other substances and relabeled.

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Toxic Waste Trade 15
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An 68 year-old inhabitant of Pohritzsch has always been against the plant since she came to the area in 1995. She remembers how the trucks passing through came from everywhere: from France, Italy, Switzerland, Belarus. Her cats died, and she remembers that many dogs in Pohritzsch and the small town Brehna died as well. Samples from the soil in the area contained many heavy metals - including uranium.

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Toxic Waste Trade 17
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

A watchdog stands guard at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch.

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Toxic Waste Trade 18
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An archive photo belonging to a former worker at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch shows how highly poisonous rubbish was simply mixed with sludge and other substances and relabeled.

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Toxic Waste Trade 20
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An inhabitant of Brehna, a small town next to Pohritzsch, has lived in the area since 1960. In the former GDR he worked in power stations like Jänschwalde, Vetschau and Lübbenau. He remembers the abominable smell in Brehna when S.D.R. Biotec operated. But he says in the former GDR, the smell from the chemical factories in Bitterfeld was much worse.

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Toxic Waste Trade 21
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

The BMG/SVG Naundorf "waste treatment plant" received over 40,000 tons of dangerous waste from the central Cröbern dump. There is to this day no trace the toxic waste said to have been re-routed there.

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Besieged Syrians Extract Fuel from Pl...
Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
14 Aug 2014

Eastern Ghouta, Damascus, Syria

Syrians in the besieged Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta have found an innovative way to turn plastic waste into petrol in light of a fuel shortage in the deprived neighborhood. While this fascinating process produces a desperately needed resource, it is also a very dirty and polluting. Toxic smoke from burning plastic engulfs the little courtyard where the fuel is produced and is leading to respiratory problem amongst the men in charge of the project.

The price of one liter of gasoline in the besieged eastern Ghouta, in rural Damascus, varies between 2500-4000 Syrian Pounds.
The price of one liter of diesel is 2000 Syrian Pounds, which led the civilians to extract fuel from plastic, which caused the price of the liter to decrease to half the price.
The extracting method consists of putting the plastic in sealed barrels through which a water pipe to passes through for cooling purposes. Then a fire is lit underneath the barrels which allows the Methane to be released first, then gasoline, and finally diesel.
There are many types of extracted fuel and the determining factor for the type of fuel released is the type of plastic used.

SHOT LIST:
Various shots show the fuel extracting method.
Shots of the fire lit underneath the barrels, the cooling pipe, and the different types of plastic.
Obtaining diesel and fuel, which are similar in color, in addition to gas, which is not useful at the current time.
General shots of the stands where fuel is sold.

TRANSCRIPT:

Speakers: Abu Hassan, a plant owner
Nabil, owns a shop for selling fuel Abu Yasser, owns a shop for selling fuel

"Here we have the filtration process, we are turning fuel into diesel, and we are turing plastic into gasoline, diesel and oil. We are extracting gas for domestic use. The whole process is about boiling and filtering, from hot to cold. It is a basic procedure."

"One kilogram of plastic can produce 800 grams of liquid, gasoline and diesel."

"Gasoline reached the price of 4000-4200 Syrian Pounds ($20-$21), and the amounts available were minimal. However, we found a substitute by heating plastic and extracting methane, gasoline, and diesel."

"The price of diesel was 3200-3500 Syrian Pounds ($16-$18.50) per liter, which is considered very expensiv. So people were no longer able to purchase it, but after we started operating on plastic and started extracting diesel from it, the price decreased to 1200-1500 SP and it became more available."

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Farm to Fork (Part 1 of 3)
Kathmandu, Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
14 Mar 2013

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!

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Farm to fork part 2/3
kathmandu, Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
13 Mar 2013

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!

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The Death of a Village
Sawantwadi, Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
11 Mar 2013

Thirty-eight yea-old Kishan Chauhan lost his leg to gangrene after a lesion caused by arsenic poisoning became infected

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The Cyanide Mountain
Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
11 Mar 2013

Locals ominously refer to this area as ‘cyanide mountain,’ referring to the large amounts of sodium cyanide present in the tailings.

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The Cyanide Mountain
Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
10 Mar 2013

Unsafe dumping from the mine has effectively rendered surrounding farmlands both infertile and poisonous to their owners.

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The Story of the Gold Mine in India
Karnataka, India
By Mais Istanbuli
10 Mar 2013

India’s abandoned Mangalur mine has been closed for 20 years, however, its toxic waste continues to haunt the lives of those inhabiting surrounding villages.

In Kanataka’s Raichur District, mine tailings continue to be dumped on farmland, rendering it not only unfertile, but also poisonous to residents. Tests on soil samples have shown this practice has effectively made the soil unsafe for use for at least 25 years.

Economic and social sectors are not the only areas suffering as a result of the toxic dumping. Locals ominously refer to the area as the 'cyanide' mountain, owing to the large amounts of sodium cyanide present in the tailings.

Chandibai, a 70-year old woman from Kiradali Tanda village, has developed deep lesions on her hands because of arsenic in the local drinking water.

Thirty-eight year old Kishan Chauhan has also been highly affected by the poisonous contents of the water. He lost his leg to gangrene after a lesion, caused by arsenic poisoning, became infected. He has since migrated over 500 kilometers away to Dodamargh, Savantwadi in Belgaum, where he earns 200 Rs (around 4 dollars) per week breaking stones. Despite his handicap, he has no choice but to work in hard labor to support his wife and two young daughters.

Dozens of such cases continue to emerge from Kiradali Tanda, where an independent study has shown has shown that water from village wells contains around 303 micrograms of arsenic per liter. The World Health Organization currently cites 10 micrograms per liter as the maximum acceptable level for human exposure.

India’s Mangalur mine, just four kilometers from the arsenic-ridden village of Kiradalli Tandi, originally began as a colonial project of Britain’s empire in the late 19th century. Karnataka’s government briefly reopened the mine nearly 70 years later, until flooding again forced it to close in 1994.

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Kill Me Quick (1 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

Joyce started drinking when her husband left in 1992. "I have no job, no husband; my children look up to me and I have nothing to offer them. Changaa doesn't taste very nice, but it does help reduce stress. I drink every day - morning, afternoon and evening. I don't have money to buy it, so I follow a man into a bar and he will share his drink with me. Some women sleep with men for a drink worth 50 ksh...."

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Kill Me Quick (3 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

"Even if you switch off the light, you continue drinking," says non-drinker Michel referring to blindness caused by Changaa. "it is a bad, bad drink which makes people ill and brings down Kenyan society."

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Kill Me Quick (2 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

Young boys drink Changaa at 10am on a Saturday morning in Mathare.

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Kill Me Quick (4 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

A young boy walks through a sewage-ridden river where Changaa is brewed.

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Kill Me Quick (8 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

"Employment is a hazard," said drunken local brewer Douglous. "I was a welder, but I have no capital to buy a machine so I lift wood for the brewers. It is easy work and I can drink. Changaa is good, but not for the ladies; my wife left me because she said I drank too much...."

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Kill Me Quick (7 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

"I have no work, no home, so I drink Changaa to warm me up at night. And to relieve my stress during the day," said regular drinker Sammy. He drinks all day, and night, until he passed out in a shack next to where the drink is brewed. He is a "taster" which means the local brewers give him free drink to ensure it is fermented properly. A "taster" will experience the strongest version of Changaa because it is direct from the barrel. "I cant move my legs, they are so swollen, but what else is there to live for but drinking? I have nothing else," he added.

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Kill Me Quick (6 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

Dixin, one of the Mathare brewers, died from tuberculosis (TB) excessive Changaa drinking last week. The police, called "Leather" because of their plain clothes, contributed to the donations for Dixin’s burial. The police have a good relationship with the brewers as they get extra income for being paid off and the brewers are allowed to keep their livelihood.

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Kill Me Quick (11 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

"I am a taster," says local brewer Japhet. A taster is someone who just tastes the alcohol to ensure it has distilled correctly. He makes 18 litres per day and works from 4am - 9pm for just 500ksh (5.7 usd). "The drink is good. People like it, and I like it because it pays me good money," he adds

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Kill Me Quick (10 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

Shahrukh Hussain started drinking Changaa when he was stabbed in the eye. He was assaulted by young boys "high" on the drink when they stole 3,000 ksh (34 usd) from him. The other eye became septic and he lost all vision. "I had no eyes, no job, no shelter - what else was I to do, but drink?" he said.

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Kill Me Quick (9 of 11)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
23 Feb 2013

Shahrukh Hussain started drinking Changaa when he was stabbed in the eye. "I stopped Changaa three months ago because it made me worse: I have a stomach ulcer and swollen feet. Changaa is so dangerous because kids rob and hurt people when they are drunk – they take advantage,” he said.

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KILL ME QUICK
Nairobi, Kenya
By Mais Istanbuli
23 Feb 2013

Changaa, meaning "Kill Me Quick", is a potent drink made and sold in slums throughout Nairobi, Kenya.
The potent drink is a concoction of jet fuel and embalming fluid both proven to be deadly ingredients resulting in the death of 130 people and blinding 20.

Understandably, the ingredients would be considered hard to come by but are purchased at Nairobi’s industrial hub and at 2 fully serviced airports. The jet fuel and embalming fluid speed up the fermentation process in order to shift more stock at a faster rate.

The operation is rumoured to be run by the much feared ‘Mungiki gang’ as well as by Kenyan and Indian businessmen whom never enter the slums but introduce the deadly drink with “runners”.

Slum dwellers opt for the drink as it is the cheaper alternative, a shot is sold for as little as one cent. The cheap high is consumed predominantly by young girls (as seen in the images) as well as men and children. Police turn a blind eye to the practice via bribes and are often seen harassing brewers that have not paid up.

Nairobi locals resent the consumption of “Kill Me Quick” in the slums yet have sympathy for those that need escapism from their day to day lives by this cheap high. They also believe that it offers new trade, employment and livelihoods to those that brew and sell it. Seeing people passed out on the street has now become an accepted daily part of their lives.