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High-Risk Education in Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By Mahmoud Alhaji Othman
11 May 2016

January 10, 2016
Aleppo, Syria

Despite shelling and barrel bomb attacks, students and volunteer instructors are still showing up at al-Risala school in the rebel held Hanano area in the northern city of Aleppo, Syria.

With no or little resources, the teachers are trying to give students a basic education in the absence of a school curriculum in areas controlled by the Syrian opposition.

The school is located in a district which has been targeted in shelling and airstrikes. “The students and teachers are in danger, the building might be heavily damaged or even destroyed at any moment” says Ibrahim al-Ali, the school principal. “We have no choice but to keep operating at high risk. This is the situation in almost all schools in rebel held Aleppo”.

Interviews:

04:03
Nada, Teacher:
“The number of students is good, but we are short of instructors. Teachers are not available. Q: What are your main needs other than for teachers?
A: We actually need everything.. The school building needs restoration, the students have not received backpacks, the teachers have no support.. There’s a lack of everything.”

04:59
Abu Hassan, Teacher:
“I am the science teacher, I try my best to improve the scientific skills of the students whether in math or physics or chemistry. Q: How do you describe the student comprehension abilities?
A: Starting directly with the curriculum in books is impossible because the students did not have the chance to learn the basics. It’s been like a month since we started teaching them the basics, the simple operations such as addition and subtraction. Introduction to physics and introduction to chemistry, we are only teaching them the basics that they missed for now.”

05:43
Mohamed, Student:
“We are here in al-Risala School, in Hanano area.. We have few teachers, a teacher of mathematics and a teacher of religious education.. We have no other teachers, however they are trying to teach us the basics so we can understand the actual curriculum. I hope that Syria will be a safe and secure place again especially in Aleppo because Bachar al-Assad targets us with barrel bombs and has destroyed all areas of Aleppo. Even our instructors had to flee because of the massive shelling.”
Q: Did you see any fighter jets striking?
A: We’ve seen a lot, and barrel bombs are dropped over our heads.”

06:32
Zainab, Student:
“We have no books but they told us that they would bring us some. We came here to study but we have shortage of teachers. The teacher is trying his best to teach us. When winter comes we have no heaters and the windows are all damaged and we have no means to replace them. Every time we go out for recess helicopters come so they bring us back inside out of fear.”

07:04
Ibrahim al-Ali, School Principal:
“We are educating the students despite the lack of an educational system. Almost all teachers are volunteers. Some are university graduates, others have just graduated from school. They are all doing volunteer work with nothing in return. The condition of the school is miserable. The building needs restoration, electricity and water repairs. We face a persistent cut of electricity which is affecting the lighting in class rooms. We also need water tanks to store water. We are also expecting the problems which we went through last year such as lack of heaters and the windows destroyed because of the constant shelling and barrel bombs by the regime.”

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Covers of the New ISIS School Textboo...
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
26 Oct 2015

ISIS has created a new curriculum for school students in areas controlled by the group. The new textbooks are being distributed to schools on a computer disk. Paper copies by the books to be given to students will be printed by each school

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The Book of "Hadith"
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Hadith (Quotations spoken by the profit Mohamed) textbook for Grade 1. This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Hand Writing Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Hand Writing Textbook for Grade 1. This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Mathematics Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Mathematics textbook for students of Grade 1. This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Science Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

This is a Science textbook for students of Grade 1. This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Physical Education Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Physical Education textbook for students of Grade 1. This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Reading Comprehension Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Reading Comprehension textbook for students of Grade 1. The title of this textbook is "I am a Muslim". This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Quran Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Quran textbook for students of Grade 1. Features selected passages from the Quran.
This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Biography of the Prophet Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Biography of the Prophet textbook for students of Grade 1. This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Islamic Faith Textbook
Mosul, Iraq
By mchreyteh
22 Oct 2015

Islamic Faith textbook for students of Grade 1. This is a textbook published and distributed to schools by ISIS under the new school curriculum for ISIS controlled areas.

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Blind Man Founds School for Visually ...
Yaounde, Cameroon
By Dzekashu Macviban
19 Feb 2015

Life for visually impaired people in Cameroon is a constant battle, given that they are discriminated upon, a phenomenon which condemns some of them to live in solitude and mendicancy. Even though many of them are undocumented and often ignored by society, this doesn’t stop them from being ambitious and entrepreneurial. This is the case with Coco Bertin, who runs CJARC, one of Cameroon’s most solicited rehabilitation centres for the visually impaired. Bertin speaks fondly of his centre, saying “I am morally gratified by the fact that I am able to help other people, so that they can share in my happiness.” 
Upon graduating in 1986, Coco Bertin, who is visually impaired, received a modest financial incentive of CFA 61.500 from the Rehabilitation Institute for the Blind in Buea. Rather than indulge in mendicancy as is the case with so many blind people, he decided to start an organisation that could provide strategic education for the visually impaired. This decision was greatly influenced by the fact that people with disabilities who go to school find it very difficult coping with a system which does not take them into account when drawing the curriculum. 
In order to achieve this, he started working on the furniture for his organisation, which he named COJARY (it was later renamed CJARC [Club des Jeunes Aveugles Réhabilités du Cameroun] in 1988) from his bedroom in his parents’ house, and as well joined forces with Martin Luther, another visually impaired person who graduated from the same school as himself. From Bertin’s parents’ bedroom, the activities moved to the veranda of the Departmental Delegation of Social Affairs in the Essos neighbourhood. 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Education Changes Under Syrian Opposi...
Aleppo
By mohammed alhadi
30 Nov 2014

November 2014
Taqad, Aleppo Province, Syria

Students in the rebel-controlled village of Taqad to the west of Aleppo no longer have to pay tribute to the Syrian regime.
In this village with a population of 11,000, public schools follow books issued by the interim government appointed by the opposition Syrian National Coalition.
The director of one the local schools says that the new curriculum “shifted from glorifying the regime to glorifying the homeland.”
References to Bath party’s ideology or the “achievements” of Presidents Bashar al-Assad and his father the late President Hafez al-Assad were omitted from the new books, which are printed in Turkey and opposition-held areas in Syria.
Schools in this little town, however, have other pressing needs to deal with. Teachers work in overcrowded classrooms and students sometimes ditch school when they hear the sound of warplanes.

Shot list

00:00 – 00:06
A medium shot shows pages from a primary-school book coming out of the printer.

00:07 - 00:20
A medium shot shows a man binding a book.

00:21 – 00:32
Interview with ِAhmad Jumaa, principal of Qaddour al-Sayyid School (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

00:33 – 00:35 A medium shot shows a man binding a book.

00:36 – 00:39
A wide shot shows graffiti that reads: “He who opens a school closes a prison – Al-Urfan Organization [an Islamic social welfare organization].”

00:40 – 00:43
A wide shot shows a young boy carrying a backpack with the UNICEF logo running across the school courtyard.

00:44 – 00:46
A close-up shot shows a school girl writing.

00:47 – 00:59
Interview with Abdel Karim Subhi, a second-grade student (Boy, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

01:00 – 01:03
A close-up shot shows the face of a young student during a mathematics lesson.

01:04 – 01:07
A wide shot shows a teacher explaining a mathematics problem to a student on the blackboard.

01:08 – 01:32
Several shots show books being printed.

01:33 – 01:30
A close-up shot shows the covers of books produced by the Syrian interim government.

01:31 – 01:46
Interview with a primary school teacher (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

01:47 – 01:53
A wide shot shows a second-grade science class in session. The teacher asks: “Who can name an animal that could fly?”

01:54 – 02:02
A medium shot shows a second-grade student answering a grammar question.

02:03 – 02:07
A close-up shot shows the hands of two students writing.

02:08 – 02:20
Interview with Rama Humaida, a seventh-grade student (Girl, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

02:21 – 02:26
A wide shot shows a teacher writing on the blackboard from behind as students follow.

02:27 – 02:44
Interview with Abdullah Jumaa, a local teacher (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

02:45 – 02:49
A close-up shot shows a page of a book issued by the Syrian regime that explains the history of the 1970 Corrective Movement, the coup d’état carried out by the Baath Party.

02:50 – 02:54
A close-up shot shows a page of a book issued by the Syrian regime that explains when President Bashar al-Assad came to power and praises Syria’s policies.

02:55 – 03:01
A close-up shot shows the covers of books produced by the Syrian interim government.

03:02 – 03:10
A wide shot shows a demolished school wall.

Interviews

00:21 – 00:32
Interview with Ahmad Jumaa, principal of Qaddour al-Sayyid School (Man. Arabic)

“I am the principal of Qaddour al-Sayyid School. The provisional Syrian government gave us schoolbooks. Some books were missing, though, and we had to print them locally.

00:47 – 00:59
Interview with Abdel Karim Subhi, a second-grade student (Boy, Arabic)

“I am eight years old. Whenever airplanes are flying, my siblings and I do not come. We wait for them to end their raids so we come to school.”

01:31 – 01:46
Interview with a primary school teacher (Man, Arabic)

“Despite the hard conditions we are living in and continuous airstrikes, we started the new academic year.”

02:08 – 02:20
Interview with Rama Humaida, a seventh-grade student (Girl, Arabic)

“My siblings and I come from a middle-class family, and we come to school every day to learn. My favorite subject is religion, and I wish to be a religion instructor in the future.”

02:27 – 02:44
Interview with Abdullah Jumaa, a local teacher (Man, Arabic)

“Books were amended to suit the current situation. All the content that glorifies [President] Bashar al-Assad and his were removed. The new books shifted from the glorification of the regime to the glorification of the entire homeland. Certain passages were omitted and other ones that suit the current phase were kept.

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The education sector in Aleppo.
Aleppo, Syria
By Mhammad Darwish
04 Nov 2013

With the continuation of the war, the Syrian education sector has become tragic after that closed schools, prompting some young volunteers in spite of not completing to undergraduate testimony to the establishment schools and institutes for teaching in it.

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Children's Resilience in Aleppo 1
Aleppo, Syria
By Walid Al Ahmad
01 Oct 2013

Aleppo- Syria, October 1, 2013: Heba Basmage, a 9 year-old diagnosed with cancer, was being treated before the revolution, but now does not have access to a hospital to continue her therapy. She insisted to continue her education.

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International Children's Day (2 of 18)
Ankara, Turkey
By Amy Hume
23 Apr 2013

Turkey's Next Generation

Turkey's International Children's Day, April 23, was created in 1927. In addition to local school celebrations, many people pay their respects to the Turkish Republic's founding father, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk on this day. Atatürk, who adopted 13 children, stressed the importance of education for future success of the Republic.

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Life In The Graves
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By U.S. Editor
13 Apr 2013

In the Idlib region, North-Western Syria, hundreds of families take refuge in the "dead cities", which are Byzantine and Christian archeologic sites from the 3rd to the 6th Century.
In the Shansharah site, 80 km from Aleppo, Syrian displaced people have transformed graves into shelters: these dark and humid places are the only safe place they found to protect themselves from rockets, mortar and air attack.
Even if this part of the Idlib region has been liberated from the regime by rebels, bombings and air attacks from the Syrian army still are the daily fate of the inhabitants. Most of the Shansharah refugees are coming from Kafr Nabel and Kafr Rouma, two free cities regularly targetted by the Syrian army.
Living conditions are extremely hard in the Shansharah site : there is no electricity and running water. The closest water well is three kilometres far from the site. Displaced people go there everyday to get water. In the site there is only an ancient thermae with stagnate water that can be used to wash dishes and the clothes. Children often dive into this microbes nest. As a consequence, diseases are proliferating because of the lack of hygiene. The first disease is however coming from an insect: the leshmaniose, which gives big and red spots that erode the skin; it is spreading among Shansharah's displaced people, especially children. No organization is providing them any treatment.

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Tens of thousands of children studyin...
Pakistan Administered Kashmir (PAK)
By objectivereporter
03 Mar 2013

Around 2, 800 schools were decimated by an earthquake that hit a large part of northern Pakistan in 2005. The government failed to reconstruct those schools even after 8 years, risking the lives of thousands of children who are forced to take lessons under the open sky in harsh winter and scorching summer. The government claims that it faces a paucity of funds to rebuild decimated schools while on the other hand, critics of government say most funds provided by the international community for rehabilitation have been directed to other projects. Officials say around 200,000 children in areas located above 5000 feet high altitude are compelled to continue study either in wall-less, roofless shelters or worn-out tents. Government claims that 1,100 schools out of total 2, 800 have so far been built while construction work 900 schools has been suspended due to want of funds. The construction work on 700 schools yet to be started. Due to non-availability of funds number of drop out of children have been increased as parents are reluctant to send their children to such schools due to health hazards.
The October 8, 2005 earthquake, which originated in the Himalayan mountains of Pakistan was the worst disaster in the history of the country; it left more than 70,000 dead, injured twice that number, left up to 1 million homeless and 1 million in immediate need of assistance.
The Government of Pakistan estimated that 17,000 children died, 23,000 children suffered disabilities and long-term injuries while more than 39,000 children lost one parent and 1,700 lost both parents. Thousands more were left homeless and vulnerable. Most of children died when they were in schools when earthquake struck the area razing sub-standard constructed schools buildings to ground and burying thousands of children alive

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HEALTH CARE IN UGANDA
Kampala, Uganda
By U.S. Editor
09 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.

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GROWING NUMBER OF YEMENI CHILDREN ADD...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By Editor's Picks
12 Dec 2012

In Yemen, Qat addictions have grown to epidemic proportions among children and young adults. The drug induces a similar high as that of caffeine, and can be highly addictive. The problem is such that many children stop going to school, instead choosing to stay home to chew the bitter plant with friends, or addicted family members. Officials are concerned about the growing problem, an fear that the plant is creating a generation of illiterate children.

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PRESSURE BUILDS IN LEBANON - Editor's...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Editor's Picks
06 Dec 2012

Clashes continued Wednesday in Lebanon's northern city of Tripoli, between residents in the Bab al-Tabbaneh and Jabal Mohsen neighborhoods who are loyal to opposing sides in Syria's civil war. In response, Prime Minister Mikati called on the Lebanese people to disassociate themselves from Syria's conflict and refrain from resorting to violence. Meanwhile, in Aleppo the conflict rages on; neighborhoods are reduced to rubble and children play in the remnants of a bombed-out school yard.

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BUNKER SCHOOLS IN SYRIA; MASKED MILIT...
Al Bab, Syria
By Editor's Picks
22 Oct 2012

Following months of routine shelling, the “liberated” Syrian town of Al Bab bands together in an attempt to grasp a bit of normalcy for their children. Since August, six schools have been shelled in Assad’s escalated aerial bombardment, and class has been moved to underground bunkers and basements, adapting to the times. Many parents fear sending their children to school, but now community members are volunteering their time in order to safely get the kids out of the house... and back to school.

Masked Militants Block Roads In Lebanon While Protests Continue At The Cabinet Building

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Concern for Za'atari Camp Refugees Gr...
Za'atari Refugee Camp, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
18 Oct 2012

October 25, 2012 - Za’atari - As Syrians continue to flee their borders, Jordan is hosting more of their neighbors from the north than any other country in the region.

 More than 210,000 Syrians have fled to Jordan since March of last year and according to the UHNCR there are 105,000 either registered or awaiting registration.

However funding requests have not kept pace with the demand for services in the Za'atari refugee camp which as of last week was hosting more than 37,000 Syrians. 

More than 50% of those in the camp are under the age of 18 according to the UNHCR. 

As Amy Hybels reports, concern for the welfare of the refugees continues as winter approaches.

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Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

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Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

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Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

Frame 0004
Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

Frame 0004
Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

Frame 0004
Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

Frame 0004
Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

Frame 0004
Massive congregation for the Bahraini...
Bahrain Sitra
By Media Made by Bahraini People
14 Sep 2012

massive congregation for the Bahraini opposition in Sitra island, south of the capital under the title:
" Bahraini children in jail " In protest against the detention of 80 children by the Bahraini authorities while schools are about to start a new academic year.

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Education in Rural Uganda (7 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

The rich red dirt paths that link the small village leave their mark on the children. More than 90% of Ugandans live in a rural area, with attendance rates in these areas lower than in urban hubs.

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Education in Rural Uganda (6 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Like all other teachers in Young Cranes Primary School, Moreen Nakiboneka teaches in English, a historical nod to Uganda's colonial past. She is a recent graduate from university, and confided that while she loves teaching, the pay, only $150 a month, isn't enough for her to make ends meet. She does, however, command the respect of the village elders and her students.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 Mar 2012

Gul-e-Khandana, the school's head teacher, helped save the girls from the Taliban at the school where she taught. She oversees the morning assembly with her students.