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Druze Reincarnation-1
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2017

View towards Beirut from Mount Lebanon, the heart of Druze community in Lebanon. The now-defunct Damascus-Beirut railway operated until the civil war broke out in 1975, and opened these mountains to tourists from across the Levant escaping the summer heat. Prior to that, it made an ideal stronghold for its autonomous community, submerged in religious secrecy.

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Druze Reincarnation-2
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2017

A Druze man plays the flute in their friends hangout, perched on the hill overlooking the valley below. The tight knit community of friends all subscribe to the ideals of Druze faith - or at least, to the little of it that they do know.

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Druze Reincarnation-9
Beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
14 Oct 2017

Young people from Nibal’s village dance Dabke - the traditional regional dance. All in their late 20s and 30s, no one has ever been shown the ways of Druze faith, without having undertaken the lifelong path of becoming a religious cleric, the sheikh.

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Syrian supporters in Beirut's Hezboll...
beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
05 Oct 2017

Syrians watch football in area controlled by Hezbollah, near Beirut’s Armenian quarter. Hezbollah, Iran’s proxy entrenched in southern Lebanon, has fought successfully alongside the Assad regime in Syria, despite Lebanon’s official policy of neutrality. The spillover from the war resulted in an ongoing ISIS militancy in north-eastern region and a multi-million Syrian influx.. The subsequent economic difficulties have left many Lebanese pointing fingers at the Syrians, not unlike the Palestinian question preluding the civil war in 1975.

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Beirut Urban Faultlines (9)
beirut
By Benas Gerdziunas
01 Oct 2017

Almost an antidote to the urban psychosis, a private-equity fuelled reach for the sky resulted in deregulated skyscrapers dotting the skyline. Whoever affords it, moves higher, only to be blocked in by the subsequent tower project.

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WFP Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May...
Bar Elias
By oski1980
02 May 2017

Interviews with the WFP Executive Director, Mr. David Beasley; Syrian Refugees and supporting B-Roll in Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017.

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WFP B-Roll Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Leba...
Adam Camp
By oski1980
30 Apr 2017

WFP B-Roll Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017

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WFP Interviews Adam Camp, Bar Elias, ...
Camp Adam
By oski1980
30 Apr 2017

WFP Interviews Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017

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Beirut Scenic and Street Shots
Beirut, Lebanon
By mchreyteh
05 Feb 2016

Various shots of Beirut streets, people using smart phones and walking in Beirut Souks shopping center.

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Hannibal Kadhafi Files
Tripoli, Libya
By mchreyteh
17 Dec 2015

In August 2011, a group of militiamen, who were fighting against the Libyan president Mummer Kadhafi, entered the house of Kadhafi’s youngest son, Hannibal, in Tripoli, and found a tablet device which they believe was his personal device.

The device was turned over to a group of media activists in Tripoli, who examined the content. On the device they found thousands of photos and videos, including personal and family images. In a folder titled “Bosleem” there were videos that appeared to show prisoners being tortured during questioning, and photos of what are believed to be prisoners including their names, some appearing to be injured. The content also included Word documents and power point presentations some of which are encrypted.

The media activists have posted on social media a number of photos of Hannibal Kadhadi and his family, and several videos of prisoners being tortured. The activists group says one of its members was kidnapped and his fate remains unknown. Since then they have felt that they are in danger and have had to change locations frequently. They decided to move the content of the device outside of Libya. They contacted Lebanese journalist Mohamad Chreyteh, and one the the activists travelled to Lebanon in 2014 and gave the journalist the content.

Mr. Chreyteh says he has been working on organizing and verifying the content over the last year. He says he decided to make some of the content public on Sunday December 13, 2015, after hearing news that Hannibal Kadhafi is being held in detention. Kadhafi was turned over to Lebanese Internal Security official by gunmen who had seized him in Baalbek on Thursday December 10. Kadhafi is under investigation and official are trying to determine if he can be put on trial in Lebanon, in connection with the disappearance in Libya of Lebanese Shiaa spiritual leader and founder of the Amal Party, Moussa al-Sadr, in 1978.

The content includes many items that have not yet been made public:

  • More than 700 photos and videos, of Hannibal Kadhafi, his wife, children, homes, yacht, private jet and international travels.
  • More than 1700 photos and names of who are believed to be detainees held at Bosleem prison in Tripoli.
  • More than 50 video clips showing what appears to be the interrogation and torture of prisoners.
  • More than 35 documents including letters from investigators in Kadhafi’s security forces to senior officials, lists with names of wanted people, lists with names of detainees, lists with names of people recommended to be set free, notes detailing prisoner interrogations, letter from a senior military police official to a senior judge.
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Family Photo (089)
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

Hannibal Kadhafi and his Lebanese born wife Aline Skaf in what is believed to be their home.

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Doc 1
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

A portion of a lengthy undated document from 2011, that appears to be a report by a Libyan security official to a superior on the uprising against the Kadhafi regime in 2011.
The subject "Summary of the current incidents based on investigations of detainees".
The report says that what it refers to as the 'conspiracy', started in Benghazi on February 7, 2011, blaming it on what are called "crusader countries" including the US, France, Italy, and the UK.
The report goes on to also blame Arab countries including Qatar, UAE and the Arab League, as well as external opposition and "internal traitors".

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Doc 2
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

This is a of a portion of an undated document from 2011, that appears to be a reply by a Libyan security official to a letter from his superior dated May 18 2011. The document appears to be a report of interrogations of prisoners who have identified other people as participants in the uprising against the Kadhafi regime.

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Doc 3
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

A portion of a document dated June 24, 2011, that appears to be a list of detainees at the 'central prison', believed to be Bosleem Prison. The document lists the names of 385 prisoners showing their file number, nationality, and location and date of their apprehension.

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Doc 4
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

A portion of an undated document from 2011, that appears to be a letter by a Libyan security officer to a superior, accusing a police officer named Sufian Fawzi al-Seid al-Zarkani, of participating in the uprising against the Kadhafi regime.
The report also claims that the officer hid members of the opposition in his house, and did not allow his family to watch Libyan state television and instead allowed them to watch external channels such as al-Jazeera and al-Arabiya.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
13 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
12 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
12 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
12 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
12 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Beirut, Lebanon
By TTM Contributor 12
12 Nov 2015

Two explosions ripped through the Bourj al-Barajneh, a Hezbollah stronghold in the southern suburbs of Lebanon's capital, Beirut.
ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack minutes after the bombing.

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Lebanon garbage crisis: Youstink mass...
Beirut
By mchreyteh
31 Aug 2015

August 29, 2015
Beirut, Lebanon

Thousands of Lebanese protested on Saturday, August 29 in Downtown Beirut, Lebanon.
The protesters vowed to escalate their measures next week if the state failed to meet their demands within 72 hours.

The protests started in August 17, 2015, pressing the government to find a solution for the garbage crisis. Soon the protests turned into demands by the “You Stink” movement and its supporters for a change of Lebanon’s leadership.

‘You Stink’ is also pressing the State Financial Prosecutor to pursue a corruption investigation of the country’s waste management sector, as well.

The campaign demands the Lebanese cabinet decision to transfer waste management authority to municipalities and hand over state money owed to them.

On Sunday, August 23, demonstrations turned violent, as police fired tear gas and hoses at thousands of protesters gathered in front of the office of Prime Minister Tammam Salam.

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Wherever They Are, We Are
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
19 Jun 2015

The image of the masked protestor, with their fiery eyes and fist in the air is one of the most iconic images in popular culture. This character has become romanticized, demonized, idolized, and oftentimes misunderstood. The upheaval that has taken place around the world, especially in the last four years, has both reinforced and broken this stereotype.

But who are those who take to the streets? Why do they do it? What do they want?

A procession of women in Nigeria, marching together with placards reading “Bring Back Our Girls”, has a considerably different tone than the charged clashes between riot police and anarchists in Greece. A candlelight vigil held by journalists in Lebanon in solidarity with Charlie Hebdo does not have the same risk of deadly violence as villagers and farmers confronting trigger-happy gunmen in Syria. And a group of concerned citizens voicing their discontent with the privatization of a public beach does not have the same high social and political stakes as those trying to overthrow an authoritarian regime.

However, despite vast differences in context and situation, those who take to the streets often share a common drive to stand up for ideas they believe in. For many, there is a common belief that by taking to the streets and making their voices public, they can influence change in their world.

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Global Refugee Crisis: The Worst Sinc...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

June 20 is World Refugee Day.

In 2014, global refugee numbers were higher than they have ever been since World War II. In 2015, the problem has only gotten worse.

There are currently over 50 million refugees in the world and more than %50 of them are children. Approximately half of the world's refugees are from just three countries: Afghanistan, Syria, and Somalia.

The response to this massive international crisis has been limited, with most refugee aid programs desperately underfunded. Amnesty International has called the lack of robust international response "A Conspiracy of Neglect." With little help on the way, the future of the world's displaced remains uncertain.

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Downtown Beirut Restaurants Struggle ...
Downtown Beirut
By b.yaacoub
14 May 2015

Restaurants and cafes in downtown Beirut are suffering under the weight of political turmoil. Several establishments have closed down and the remaining ones are trying their best to survive. The manager of one these remaining restaurants said that he has lost about 90% of his customers in the past year and a half.

What was once a promising tourist area, which started growing after the implementation of reconstruction plan, has suffered consecutive blows due to protests staged in Riad Soleh square since 2008 and wider unrest in Lebanon and neighboring Syria.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

-Wide shot of Place de L’Étoile (Nijmeh Square) -Medium shot of Place de L’Étoile - Medium shot of empty tables at an outdoor restaurant -Close-up shot of empty tables -Close-up shot of sign that reads ‘For rent’ with a phone number - Medium shot of two closed shops - Medium shot of a closed shop -Close-up shot of chains with a lock -Wide shot of pedestrian area - Medium shot of closed shops -Wide shot of a closed restaurant -Close-up shot of a steel restaurant area -Close-up shot of piled tables
-Medium shot of tables -Various shots of Ali Abdel Wahed while working at the restaurant -Out of focus/focus, wide shot of pedestrian area -Various shots of ‘For rent’ sign of a closed shop -Wide shot of a closed restaurant -Wide shot of a street -Various shot of closed down shops -Various shot of a closed down restaurant -Wide shot of a closed down shops -Wide shot of Place de L’Étoile -Pan right on a closed down restaurant -Various shots of a clothing shop -Various shot of Place de L’Étoile -Travelling shot of several closed shops -Various shot of Place de L’Étoile -Various shots of empty tables at a restaurant -Various shots of a closed down restaurant -Various shots of a closed down shops -Wide shot of Star square -Pan right on a closed shop - Various shot of a closed down shops -Tilt down on a street with closed shops -Wide shot of Place de L’Étoile -Mid shot on a closed restaurant -Various on empty tables in an outdoor restaurant -Close-up shot of Place de L’Étoile sign -Various shots of a man having lunch and water pipe at a restaurant -Various shots of Houssam and his friends having water pipe and lunch -Various shots of a closed shop -Wide shot of Riad Soleh square -Wide shot of kidnapped soldiers’ families protest tent -Tilt down of photos of kidnapped and killed Lebanese soldiers -Various shots of protest tents in Riad Soleh square -Various shots of barbed wire at Riad Soleh square -Various shots of small children’s drawings and writings on a bridge
-Various shots of writing on the wall that read “Before I die I want Lebanon To” -Various shots of a building that still has the civil war traces -Various shots of Mohamad Al Amin Mosque and Martyrs’ Square

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Beirut Authors Hope to Inspire Reader...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
02 May 2015

Mono Street, Beirut, Lebanon

May 2, 2015

On the first Saturday of every month, professional antique sellers, second-hand book vendors and everyone else who wants to sell and buy books gather on Mono Street.

Among these vendors are also authors who took the chance to reach out to potential readers directly. One of the authors addresses women, and hopes to encourage them to overcome the difficulties of their lives with short, uplifting poems.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of people passing by bookstands
Close-up of books on a stand
Various of man holding a book
Pan right of the street
Various of books on a stand
Various of a female vendor behind her stand
Close-up of a book titled ‘Drole de Visite du Musee National de Beyrouth’
Various of books
Mid shot on Annie
Mid shot of two people reading
Various of a store for books and art
Various of people in the market
Close-up of ‘Spark Your Imagination’ books
Medium of books on a stand
Various of Houwaida Bitar sitting behind her desk
Close up shot on Spark your mind stand
Various of a man and woman playing the drums
Various of handmade accessories
Various of Grace Tawile behind her stand
Wide of street book market

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Syrian Kurdish Refugees Find a Home i...
Akre
By Mat Wolf
20 Mar 2015

March 20, 2015
Akre, Iraqi Kurdistan 


Housed inside a former detention facility, Syrian Kurds who fled fighting in their homeland are doing their best to restore normalcy in their lives in the mountainous Iraqi Kurdish city of Akre in the Dohuk government.
 
At the Akre settlement for Syrian Kurds—housed inside a former prison and Baathist military base—parents look on as their children run around the facility’s courtyard setting off fireworks. Youngsters are also working on a mural covering part of the two-story, yellow brick facility’s walls and stairwells in an art project sponsored by the Rise Foundation NGO and local teachers. Cartoon characters, animals and hearts are popular themes in the artwork.
 
“I like the trees, flowers, woods—the natural views,” says English teacher and fellow refugee Nazim Qamr, 29. He adds he’d prefer the children avoid cartoon characters, but it’s not up to him.
 
“We ask the children and listen to their opinions about what they like and don’t like,” Qamr says. 
 
As rays of sun occasionally poke through the clouds on an otherwise gloomy March 20, Iraqi Kurdistan’s mountains and postcard beauty makes it easy to forget the Akre settlement is a refugee camp. Housing just under 1,500 people—many of them small children—its residents are afforded small apartments converted from prison cells, and many admit they’re superior to the UN tents and ad-hoc structures that define many of the region’s refugee camps.
 
“They gave each family a room,” says 24-year-old English teacher Kawther Ahmed, originally from Damascus. She came to Akre with her family a year and a half ago, and said camp administrators from Iraq’s Kurdistan Regional Government have done their best to ensure the Syrian Kurds feel welcome. “Compared to the tents, this building is better than the tents,” she says.
 
Because the Syrians at Akre have been taken in by their fellow Kurds, they’re also allowed more privileges than the local government typically allows non-Kurdish refugees. Residents of the Akre settlement are allowed to freely come and go from the camp once they’ve filed residency paperwork, and can seek work in the local community. But despite some advantages given to Kurdish refugees in Kurdish territory, many of Akre’s Syrians still bear the scars of their homeland’s complex civil war, and have faced difficulties in adjusting to life in Iraq.
 
Adnan Mahmoud, 35, says he is originally a mechanic from Qamishli who fled the forces of the so-called Islamic State in Syria and came to Iraq a year and half ago. Since that time he’s developed a cataract in his left eye, and he says he’s gone partially blind. “It’s a simple surgery, but they don’t have doctors here to do it, and I’ve filed paperwork to go to a hospital that can, but nothing’s working,” he says.

He adds his young daughter Haifa has suffered a knee injury, and has had an X-ray done, but she also needs surgery and the refugees at Akre can’t find basic medical care.
 
Mahmoud’s friend and neighbor Samir Mohamed Saleh, 31, is a former restaurant worker who lived in both Syria and Lebanon before fleeing to Iraq a year and a half ago. He adds that in addition to insufficient medical care, work opportunities for Syrian Kurds in Iraq are limited and low paying.
 
They both say they’d like to be able to find real, serious work like they had in Syria. Like other men in the camp, they’ve found work packing and loading gravel, but they say the salary is poor and the work exhausting, sometimes for as little as $1.30 a day.
 
“We need real work, we need self-respect,” Samir says.
 
He adds however he thinks the Iraqi Kurds have been gracious, and that at least in Akre he has a roof over his head and food to eat.
 
“It’s good here, we have bread, electricity, food and water,” he says. “The Kurds in Iraq have helped us a lot, I mean we’re the same nation, but we still need more.”