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Lavori in corso
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Porta aperta
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Casa e crepe
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Attendere prego
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Casa e puntelli
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Centro storico
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Arco senza trionfo
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Zona rossa
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 01
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 02
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 03
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 04
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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Kobane Drone Footage Highlights (Trai...
Kobane
By Joe Lukawski
04 Oct 2015

Video shot between October 5 and December 10, 2015.
Drone footage showing reconstruction efforts in the Kurdish city of Kobane, on the Syrian border with Turkey. Workers and machinery remove debris in the areas that were destroyed during intense fighting between Kurdish forces and Islamic State militants. In the outskirts of the city, refugee camps were set up for people who fled Raqqa, the capital of the so called Islamic State.

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Kurdish Girl Describes IS Attack in K...
Suruc, Turkey
By Ibrahim Husseini
26 Jun 2015

17 year old Suzan Hamo is a Kurdish girl from Kobane, Syria. She fled her home in Kobane after IS fighters attacked the town in the early hours of Thursday June 25, 2015. She says her house was set on fire and she received burn wounds as a result. Suzan is now receiving medical attention in Suruc.

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Gunfire Between YPG and IS Forces in ...
Kobane, Syrian-Turkish border
By Ibrahim Husseini
25 Jun 2015

Kobane, Syria
June 25, 2015

Footage taken from the Turkish side of the border shows sporadic fighting between the Kurdish YPG and the IS fighters. Kurdish sources say that IS fighters remain encircled by the YPG in Kobane, in two positions. Reports say that the IS have positioned themselves in a school and have taken hostages there. No exact figure on the number of the hostages were given.

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Tirana City Scenes
Sheshi Skënderbej, Tirana,Albania
By mattia.marinolli
19 Jun 2015

A series of clips of landmarks from the Albanian capital Tirana.

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"

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The streets of raqqa 02
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

An IS fighter takes on the role of traffic police. The Islamic State fighters in charge of governing Raqqa come from a variety of backgrounds. Some fighters are from Raqqa and some are Syrians from other cities. There are also fighters from different countries, including Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and Morocco. The key is that those who interact with the public are Arabs because it is important for citizens to be able to communicate with the authorities in the streets.

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Recycling the Rubble of War in Gaza
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
20 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Gazans are salvaging construction materials from the rubble of buildings that were destroyed by Israeli military action in the 2014 summer war. Over 45,000 houses were destroyed in the war and the ongoing Israeli blockade is preventing Gazans from importing cement for rebuilding purposes. Instead, Gazans are left to find creative ways to rebuild their communities, including recycling rubble.

Burj Al Basha, in the heart of Gaza city, was completely demolished during the last Israeli war against Gaza. The building was one of the main landmarks in Gaza city. Its bombardment left huge amounts of rubble to the extent that it closed off two of the main streets in the city. Tens of workers using heavy equipment are trying to clear a path for the traffic. During the process workers try to recycle iron bars from the rubble to be used for future construction projects. They are also recycling pieces of concrete for street paving projects.

Abu Ali Daloul is one of the main traders of recycled iron bars in Gaza. He bought tons of the iron bars removed from the rubble of the recent war. He fixes the bars and prepares them to be used again for construction purposes.

The concrete rubble are transported to stone breaking workshops in order to be turned into pebbles for use on road paving projects. Abu Lebda is a stone breading workshop which recycles concrete rubble and provides brick manufacturers with pebbles to make bricks with

Malaka concrete bricks factory brings the pebbles from Abu Lebda's stone breaking workshop and puts the amounts in its stores hoping the cement to pass through the crossings to be able to produce bricks suffecient to rebuild Gaza.

Despite the strenuous efforts Gazans are undertaking to create new methods to rebuild their shattered communities, cement is still the biggest challenge for them as the blockade on the coastal enclave remains.

Shot List:
Shots of a machine breaking concrete in Burj Al Basha site.
Shots of a bulldozer removing the rubble.
Shots of workers collecting and rehabilitating iron bars.
Shots of Abu Ali Daloul's store for recycled construction iron bars
Shots of Abu Lebdda concrete stone breaking manufactory recycling the rubble
Shots of Malaka's concrete bricks factory

Interviews:

(02:00) Waleed, a worker in Burj al-Basha (man, Arabic):
"We are in Gaza at the gates of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) that was shelled by Israel. We modify iron so we can reuse it. We do this so we can rebuild Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower). As you know, the iron factories are not working, so we have to work with the rubble. We take the iron that came from the rubble of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) and we work on it so we can reuse it to rebuild the area."

(02:37) Mohamad, a worker in Burj al-Basha site (man, Arabic):
"We are now in front of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) , it is a factory for modifying iron. There are about 25 workers here in addition to a modifying expert. Our job is to remove the rubble from the buildings that were destroyed by Israel. We separate the iron from the concrete. We modify the iron and store it in a storage room to be reused in the future. And we also put the concrete in special storage units to be reused later, it can be used for construction or as asphalt for the roads. We work on re-appropriating iron from the buildings that were destroyed so we can use it in construction work or other things.

(04:06) Abu Ali Daloul, Iron trader in Gaza: We did not think of taking this as a profession before and we never thought about it. However, because of the destruction that happened, we had to resort to what we call 'self-sufficiency'. If the roads are closed and we are sieged, we need to build the country and we need this material. At first we started separating the iron, some of the iron is junk, some is appropriate for manufacturing. It can be used for construction, but mostly it is used for manufacturing, it can be used for shielding windows, making nails and other similar aspects. The rest of the iron which is in good condition goes to construction. The closest site to us was Burj al-Basha, and Burj al-zafer, and also in 8th street, there used to be a building near Ali Bin Abi Taleb Mosque. Its rubble blocked the road, so we had to remove them quickly because it was affecting the traffic. At the moment, all the iron that we have is from Burj al-Basha. We were able to take out of Burj al-Basha about 45 tons the first time we tried salvaging. Most of the iron we extracted is already sold, but the problem of the lack of concrete is what is postponing the construction process. No matter what, we will build our country, which our iron, our products, our work and effort.

(07:17) Abu Mohamad Abu lebdda, owner of a concrete breaking factory:
After the war, and after Israel had destroyed the houses and blocked paths, we did not have concrete entering Gaza. So we had to recycle the rubble, to produce concrete, and to make bricks to be used in construction. We also reuse the metal after adjusting it. As you can see, the workers here, separate the rubble from the wood, the clothes, plastic and of the remaining found under the rubble. We clean it then crush it using machines, and we produce gravel, the soft one for building bricks and the rough one is used as concrete.
As I already stated, there are two types of gravel, the rough one we call "lentil", used as concrete, and the soft one we call it "sesame seeds", used to build bricks.

(09:21) Lad Malaka:
We build these bricks from the gravel made by the rubble recycling factories in Gaza. This type of brick is used for building roofs. We need good quality, so the brick has to pass through a test, we take it and examine it near the Islamic University. This brick passed the test and was made according to the required quality. We increase the cement [the small amount of cement available, which is mixed with the rubble] a bit, and it gives us a great quality.

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Syrian-Palestinian Refugees find New ...
Gaza City
By Yasser Abu Wazna
03 Sep 2014

August 30-31, 2014
Gaza City and Beit Hanoun, Gaza

Mr. Atef el Emawai is a Palestinian refugee who fled the brutal siege of the Yarmouk camp in Damascus for the Gaza Strip. Once in Gaza he and his family soon found themselves in the middle of another war. When Israel launched the July 2014 war in Gaza, Atef's new house was destroyed and his family once again had to flee their home, this time to the still dangerous Gaza City.

Before the war in Syria, Atef had established a comfortable life in Syria for him and his family. Despite not being a Syrian citizen, Atef had married a Syrian wife and built a successful business. However, Atef lost most of his fortune when the Syrian War broke out. The violence in the Damascus suburb of Harasta forced him to relocate to the Yarmouk camp with his family. However, the ensuing violence in Yarmouk forced him and his family to flee the country all together.

Atef decided to return to his birthplace, the city of Beit Hanoun, in the Gaza Strip. For Atef, Gaza was a long sought after dream, a place of peace he had always yearned to return to.

When he arrived he established a committee to help assist the 200 Syrian refugee families living in Gaza. He also, with the assistance of his wife, established a food processing workshop in his rented house in Beit Hanoun.

However, Atef soon realized his choice to return to Gaza was a mistake when Israel launched the July 2014 war. His house and business in Beit Hanoun were demolished by Israeli forces. He and his family had to flee Beit Hanoun and had to relocate four times during the war until they settled again in Gaza City.

A man in his sixties, Atef now feels helpless and that he can no longer improve his situation. He cannot afford the university fees of Madhat, his son, or the rental of the new apartment he lives in now. Unemployment and very poor aid from the Palestinian government makes life miserable for him and his family. His wife, Mrs. Wisam says, ‘I regret I came to Gaza. I hope I can leave it.’

Translations:

(02:03)“This photo was hung on the wall, along with the photos of my mother and father. We could only find the photo of my father in law, we are very proud of it of course. God have mercy on my mother’s and father’s soul, we were not able to find their photos”. (02:21)

(02:35) “Because I do not have a refrigerator, I am going to take them to the neighbor’s house, so they would not get ruined”. (02:39)

(02:53) “It was not our free will that brought us to Gaza, Gaza was our only option, one way. We were not able to go to Lebanon, or Jordan, or Turkey, or any other place. We came here because we have relatives here, there is a home, a country. (03:13)

(03:14) “We used to live in Harasta. We fled to al-Yarmouk camp because it was safe and it had many Palestinians. Though my wife is originally Syrian, we witnessed how things escalated in the area of north Damascus, which is a part of Eastern Ghouta. Harasta and Douma are a part of Eastern Ghouta”. (03:43)

(03:44) “Many people told us that we were leaving a bad place to go to another”.(03:47)

(04:48) “We took some money from a few friends, as a loan, and we started a pastry factory. When we were in Syria we had a textile factory, it was average, but we were living comfortably off that factory. We had over 40 families working in it, and over 60-70 families during high season. Now in Gaza, we were hit really hard, this war came to kill all of our dreams of living a comforting dignified life. It destroyed those dreams by taking everything that we have built and to take us back to the point zero in this old age. We are not young people to start over again”. (04:45)

(04:46) “Concerning fear, I was more afraid in Syria, to be honest, because we did not know our enemy. I used to worry about my son going out, not only from the shelling or the bombing, but also from people, from the road blocks, kidnapping. You fear rape for the girls, so the fear there was much bigger. Death is the same, but.. here the enemy is very clear, you know that you are just like anyone else. As they say, dying with a group is easier, you know that you are just like anyone else, you could die any minute. There [Syria[ the situation was much harder because you do not know where your enemy is”. (05:31)

(05:32) “I hope to go back to Syria, I do not think it is anytime soon, I do not have hope that Syria will go back. I wish of course for Syria to go back to the way it was, despite of the government, I am not talking about the regime, I am talking about the humane loving, wonderful atmosphere that used to be in the past. However, I think this matter will take too long, and based on that, I cannot return to Syria under these circumstances because, first of all, my nationality, and the fact that we are unable to go back. If you want to go back to Syria, what will you do?Simply work, a person has to work and build his life, and there is not a way to do that in this situation in Syria right now. Also to remain in Gaza, the way it is now, is also insanity”. (06:51)

(06:53) “My choice to leave Gaza is not an unlikely thing, but it is not on the table at the moment”. (07:01)

(07:02) “In the beginning of the war we moved to a house so we wouldn't be alone. It is better if we are with a group and we can run together. Then it escalated, so we spent a night in Jabalia. The house was small and packed with people. Then we went to another place and we stayed with 40 people in the same house. A Syrian family took us in, then we came to this house after 47 days.

When we first arrived to Gaza, there was this feeling of wonderment, about why we came to Gaza. People in Gaza have enough problems, and the issues they have are not easy, and even once I was saying that most Syrian refugees here have university degrees, so they said: “why did you come here? The inhabitants of Gaza are not finding jobs”. They feel that whoever comes here is taking job opportunities from the Palestinians”. (08:12)

(08:13) “We are four people, two children, and my husband and I. A small family and still we suffer. As you know, a university student has expenses for university and transportation, tuition fees”. (08:33)

(08:35) “I deeply regret coming to Gaza, I wish we had not come here”. (08:41)

(08:42) “Here are our passports. My Syrian passport, these are the stamps of entering Gaza, here is the residency [permit] of my daughter and the residency [permit] of my son. Here is my husband’s passport and it has the residency on it from Syria. These are school papers for my son and for my daughter, those papers are from Syria.

Our memories in Syria, this picture is taken in Douma garden, with Abu Salim’s family, I saw him today.

This is a bit burnt because of the fire that happened in Hanan’s house, it is from Syria. My son loves Palestine, and while he was in Syria someone got him this box that has Palestine on it for his birthday. That is the only thing he brought with him from Syria, it is the only thing for him he found in the ruins when Hanan’s house was destroyed. He brought this Qanun with him from Syria, it was not easy to carry on the plane. The room was burnt completely but it was not affected. The whole room burnt, but nothing happened to it”. (11:17)

(11:22) “This is the entrance of the house we used to live in”. (11:28)

(11:50) “Here we witnessed the first five days of the war, ever since the first day of the ground invasion, we were here, sitting two families together, from upstairs you will have a better view”. (12:06)

(12:14) “That night we spent it here at the door, I do not play cards, but I wanted to entertain them, so I told them to come up so we can play cards. We got a table and chairs and we spent the night here, the Israelis were not far away, we were sitting here and the bullets were hitting the window of the house”. (12:37)

(12:38) “This was the living room, I got this refrigerator two days prior to Ramadan, it is gone, you cannot even see it anymore. The things I told you were brought from Syria, were there, and there was our bedroom”. (13:19)

(13:28) “I had two refrigerators and a freezer because I prepare a lot of food in advance, it's all gone now”. (13:38)

(13:40) “There was the closet, there was a wall here, and here are the remains of the closet, and the remains of our things. This is what is left of our bed, this was a gift for mother’s day, the children brought it from Damascus”. (14:13)

(15:24) “A harsh and heartless enemy does not know the difference between the elderly and the young, or between men and women”. (15:34)

(15:35) “We are refugees from Syria, we lost everything in Syria, we came here and lost everything again. We do not having a stable income, I am a university student, and since my family does not have a stable income, I am trying to find work just to cover my tuition fees. Unfortunately, Gaza has an unbelievable rate of unemployment. We are trying to live, despite the siege, the destruction, the poverty and the horrible situation our population is going through, we will try to live”. (16:22)

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Last days of maydan 01
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

A woman begs police not to demolish the barricades and tents.

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Last days of maydan 02
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

Activists and police clash in the Ukrainian capitalÕs center after communal workers tried to dismantle the Maidan protestors' camp. This follows a months-old conflict over the camp between pro-democracy protestors and the city administration.

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Last days of maydan 03
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

Activists argue with the police, who don military equipment. They have come to dismantle the camp set up in Kiev's Maidan square.

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Last days of maydan 04
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

Police evacuate a wounded colleague from the Maidan camp where protestors clash with authorities who want to dismantle their camp.

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Last days of maydan 05
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

A Cossack taking part in the protests stands before a pile of burning tires that fills the air with thick smoke.

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Last days of maydan 06
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

A photographer walks by a tire fire extinguished by local authorities as they try to remove protestors from Maidan square.

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Last days of maydan 08
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

Police detained a young man who they believed to be carrying a bomb.

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Last days of maydan 09
Kiev, Ukraine
By Igor Golovniov
06 Aug 2014

Young man wears a gas mask to protect himself from the thick smoke of burning tires and in case tear gas is used by the police, who are trying to remove protestors from Kiev's Maidan square.

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North Korea in Black and White 009
By Ulrik Pedersen
07 Jun 2014

Woman in Wosan in front of pictures of the president and general. Pyongyang, North Korea.

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North Korea in Black and White 024
By Ulrik Pedersen
03 Jun 2014

View of Kaesong city. Kaesong city is where the industrial zone between the south and north are located. The zone brings hard needed dollars to the government. Kaesong, North Korea.

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North Korea in Color 025
By Ulrik Pedersen
01 Jun 2014

A view from the Juche tower. Kim Jong Un, leader of North Korea, has started a new program attempting to build high-rise buildings in record speed.

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Kyiv Citizens and Barricades
Kyiv, Ukraine
By Max Kozmenko
03 Mar 2014

Nowadays barricades and the camp city at the Independent square in Kyiv attract many tourists. But Kyiv citizens as well like to come there and walk around. They give a big support to protesters.

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view of Sanandaj
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Feb 2014

The view of Sanandaj with the mountains in the background. Sanandaj is growing and growing, both economically and population even with the restrictions on Iran and internal restriction on the Kurdish population. There is a university and one of the few bright spots in the Kurdish area. Sanandaj, Iran.

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New city
kish island, iran
By Ulrik Pedersen
03 Oct 2013

New city areas are being built on other places on the island. Kish Island, Iran.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.