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Ali Abdullah Saleh returns to public ...
Sana'a, Yemen
By luke_somers
27 Feb 2013

A child in Sana'a, Yemen wears a picture of Ali Abdullah Saleh at a gathering where the ousted president made his first public appearance in 18 months.

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Childhood in refugee camps in Jordan
Ramtha, Jordan
By hamzaeqab
12 Feb 2013

Sidra a little girl living at garden camp for Syrian refugees

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Afghan child in Logar
Logar, Afghanistan
By johnjournalist
01 Feb 2013

An Afghan child in the troubled province of Logar

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 18
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
24 Jan 2013

Cerro Lunar: Vanesa Canesa is photographed with her daughter Ana Paula in front of their little house, made with stones and "calamina" (metal layer), in Cerro Lunar, Ananea, Peru. Vanesa is a miner's wife and she used to support her husband working on "Pallaqueo" (collecting stones thrown from the mines looking for gold) and now she quit due to health reasons.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 24
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
21 Jan 2013

A child is dressed by her mother after being assisted by a doctor at the health center in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru. Most of the children in La Rinconada suffer malnutrition and problems of growth due to cold weather and pollution.

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Syrian refugee tries to call home on ...
Zaatari refugee camp, Al-Mafraq, Jordan
By Daniel Pye
25 Dec 2012

A young Syrian refugee with his father at Za'atari Refugee Camp, Jordan, on December. 25, 2012. Refugees in the camp gather on this small hill in the hope of calling their relatives in Syria. It is the only place where Syriatel signal can be picked up. Syriatel is owned by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's cousin, Rami Makhlouf.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (9...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A girl was injured when a bomb fell on her home in Hass, Syria and glass got into her arm. Now she and her family, who live in tents at Qah camp near the Turkish border, are among Syria's two million internally displaced people. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A woman and child look through a tent at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. Cold weather and rain has increased the hardships faced by nearly 3600 displaced Syrians, many from the destroyed town of Hass have taken refuge there. Since Turkey began turning away refugees, many thousands have moved to tents on the Syrian side of the border.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (1...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A boy is examined by Medecins Du Monde doctor at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (4...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

A boy with shrapnel in his leg at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Syria - A Step Away From Heaven (6 of...
Kilis, Turkey
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Mohannad, the kid in the corner, and Mahros Ashoy, on the bed, have reported injuries to their legs during a bombing in Halep.

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Bedouin Settlement Near Israeli Housi...
Ma’aleh Adummim, West Bank
By javiervidela
06 Dec 2012

Hands of a Bedouin woman with her son. Women tend to marry very young, it is quite normal even marry before age 18.

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Bedouin Settlement Near Israeli Housi...
Ma’aleh Adummim, West Bank
By javiervidela
06 Dec 2012

Mother with her daughter in front of fireplace at home in front of the settlement of Ma'aleh Adumim. Women tend to marry very young, it is quite normal even marry before age 18.

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Child lead anti-government protest in...
Aleppo, Syria
By Jean Carrere
30 Nov 2012

A child chants and leads an anti-government protest in Aleppo. Every friday, protesters gather for peaceful protests calling for the ousting of president Bashar al-Assad, despite protests often being the targets of government airstrikes.

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soccer
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Nov 2012

Boy playing soccer in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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Walk for children of Syria (63 of 65)
Bologna, Italy
By Michele Pero
17 Nov 2012

Walk for Syrian children in Bologna, Italy, on November 17, 2012. Syrian people from all over the world meet up for a global walk for to drive the attention of the world to the condition of Syrian children left under the regime of Assad.

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Protesting Israeli Strikes In Gaza (6...
ESCWA, Beirut, Lebanon
By hussein baydoun
15 Nov 2012

The Lebanese Communist Party and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine demonstrated in front of the ESCWA (Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia) building in Beirut, Lebanon, demonstrating against the Israeli strikes inside the Gaza Strip on Thursday, November 15, 2012.
Photo: Hussein Beydoun

إعتصام لحزب الشيوعي اللبناني والجبهة الشعبية لتحرير فلسطين مقابل مبنى اسكوا في بيروت ضد مجازر الاسرائليين في قطاع غزة. بيروت ، لبنان . تصوير : حسين بيضون

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

10 year old amputee Pat Roty lost his leg 3 years ago whilst playing close to his home. Landmines in rural areas of Cambodia are still a major problem, and unfortunately a large percentage of the victims are children.

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In the land of God: Huaorani Woman & ...
Pastaza Ecuador
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Oct 2012

Cononaco Bameno-Ecuador(South America) October 27th-2012-EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY.
The Huaorani, also known as the Waos, are native Amerindians from the Amazonian Region of Ecuador (Napo, Orellana and Pastaza Provinces) who have marked differences from other ethnic groups from Ecuador. They comprise almost 4,000 inhabitants and speak the Huaorani language, a linguistic isolate that is not known to be related to any other language. Their ancestral lands are located between the Curaray and Napo rivers, about 50 miles (80 km) south of El Coca. These homelands – approximately 120 miles (190 km) wide and 75 to 100 miles (120 to 160 km) from north to south – are threatened by oil exploration. In 1993, the Huaorani, and Quichua indigenous people, filed a lawsuit against Texaco oil company for the environmental damages caused by oil extraction activities in the Lago Agrio oil field. After handing control of the oil fields to an Ecuadorian oil company, Texaco did not properly dispose of its hazardous waste, causing great damages to the ecosystem and crippling communities. And recently, an US oil giant, has been fined $8.6 billion, for causing devastating pollution in large parts of the Ecuadorian Amazon basin, where Huaorani tribe lives. The oil firm Texaco, wich merged with Chevron in 2001, had been accused of dumping billions of gallons of toxic waste into unlined pits in the Amazon’s rainforest and rivers. Tribes indigenous to the area, like the Huaorani, have campaigned for almost two decades against the firm’s actions, saying that the poisonous waste has increased cancer rates, killed wildlife and contaminated water.In the past, Huaorani were able to protect their culture and lands from both indigenous enemies and settlers but the fighting against the multinational oil company, still goes on.
In the last 40 years, they have shifted from a hunting and gathering society to live mostly in permanent forest settlements. In traditional animist Huaorani worldview, there is no distinction between the physical and spiritual worlds, and spirits are present throughout the world. The Huaorani once believed that the entire world was a forest (and used the same word, ömë, for both). The Oriente’s rainforest of Ecuador, remains the essential basis of their physical and cultural survival. For them, the forest is home, while the outside world is considered unsafe: living in the forest offered protection from the witchcraft and attacks of neighboring peoples.
The Huaorani believe the animals of their forest have a spiritual as well as physical existence. They believe that a person who dies walks a trail to the afterlife which has a large anaconda snake lying in wait. Those among the dead who cannot escape the snake fail to enter the domain of dead spirits and return to Earth to become animals, often termites. This underlies a mix of practices that recognize and respect animals, but does not shield them from harm for human use.
Hunting supplies a major part of the Huaorani diet and is of cultural significance. Traditionally, the creatures hunted were limited to monkeys, birds, and wild peccaries. Neither land-based predators nor birds of prey are hunted. Traditionally there was an extensive collection of hunting and eating taboos. They refused to eat deer, on the grounds that deer eyes look similar to human eyes. While a joyful activity, hunting (even permitted animals) has ethical ramifications: “The Huaorani must kill animals to live, but they believed dead animal spirits live on and must be placated or else do harm in angry retribution.” To counterbalance the offense of hunting, a shaman demonstrated respect through the ritual preparation of the poison, curare, used in blow darts. Hunting with such darts is not considered killing, but retrieving, essentially a kind of harvesting from the trees. Spearing wild peccaries, on the other hand, is killing and is practiced with violence and rage.
While never hunted, two other animals, the snake and the jaguar, have special significance for the Huaorani. Snakes are considered "the most evil force in the Huaorani cosmology", particularly the imposing (though nonvenemous) anaconda, or obe. A giant obe stands in the way of the forest trail that the dead follow to an afterlife with the creator in the sky. Here on earth, snakes are a bad omen, and traditionally killing them is considered taboo.
The Huaorani identify deeply with the jaguar, an important and majestic predator in the Oriente province of Ecuador. According to myth, the Huaorani were the descendants of a mating between a jaguar and an eagle. Elders became shamans by metaphorically adopting “jaguar sons” whose spirits communicate medical and spiritual knowledge. In the Huaorani belief system, jaguar shamans are able “to become a jaguar, and so to travel great distances telepathically and communicate with other Huaorani.”
Plants, especially trees, continue to hold a complex and important interest for the Huaorani. Their store of botanical knowledge is extensive, ranging from knowledge of materials to poisons to hallucinogens to medicines. They also relate plants to their own experiences, particularly that of growing. Among trees, certain kinds are auspicious. Canopy trees, with their distinctly colored young leaves and striking transformation as they mature to towering giants, are “admired for their solitary character … as well as for their profuse entanglement” with other plants. Other significant trees are the pioneer species of the peach palm (used for making spears and blowguns, as well as for fruit), and fast-growing balsa wood, used for ceremonial purposes. Peach palm trees are associated with past settlements and the ancestors who live there.
The Huaorani notion of time is particularly oriented to the present, with few obligations extending backwards or forwards in time. Their one word for future times, baane, also means "tomorrow". Spears are the main weapons of the Huaorani culture used in person to person conflict.
Their main hunting weapon is the blowgun. These weapons are typically from 3 to 4 metres long. The arrows used are dipped in curare poison, which paralyzes the muscles of the animal which is hit with it, so that it cannot breathe. Kapok fluff is used to create an air-tight seal, by twisting the fibers around the end of the dart or arrow. The pictures shows an old woman with a little huaorani boy, navigating the Cononaco Bameno river.

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Eid preparation in Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By Jean Carrere
26 Oct 2012

A child stands in front of several slaughtered sheep in preparation of the Eid el-Adha holiday in Aleppo. The child lost several relatives in the past months due to the fierce fighting taking place in his hometown.

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Interview with a child talking about ...
EGYBT,FAYOM CITY
By Sara Abd Alaziz
26 Oct 2012

Part of my documentary film about child workers, and thisi was meeting with a child supported Hamadein alSabahi and refuses to Mursi and the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood

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Mourning family in Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By Jean Carrere
21 Oct 2012

A child breaks down in tears in front of an emergency hospital in Aleppo, having been orphaned by a government airstrike that hit a local bread factory.

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Injured child in Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By Jean Carrere
21 Oct 2012

A man carries his wounded grand daughter away from an emergency hospital, helped by her young cousin. All have lost relatives in a government airstrike that hit a local bread factory.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, a 54-year-old immigrant from Nigeria, is watching Lia Lemonjava, a hairdresser sharing the same store, perforate a local girl's ears for her first earrings. Lemonjava, who has been working with Nelson for the last six years, says that his a very honest and reliable person. But best of all, she says, is that "he loves Georgians."

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Aleppo Cries (Part 10 of 17)
Aleppo, Syria
By Maamoun
18 Oct 2012

Child body on the sidewalk, Al Sha'ar neighborhood in Aleppo.

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2012 Venezuelan Presidential Election...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
07 Oct 2012

Child with the Venezuelan flag in the door of the polling station.

Venezuelan immigrants living in Barcelona turnout to vote for their new president. Barcelona is on of five Spanish cities that provided a place for Venezuelans to vote in the election, with 13 tables in the Holy Family Civic Center.

Niño con la bandera de Venezuela en la puerta del colegio electoral.

Los inmigrantes venezolanos residentes en Barcelona acuden a votar a su nuevo presidente. Barcelona es una de las cinco ciudades españolas que han habilitado un espacio para votar en los comicios venezolanos, con 13 mesas en el Centro Cívico Sagrada Familia.

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Aleppo Cries (Part 12 of 17)
Aleppo, Syria
By Maamoun
03 Oct 2012

There is nothing more painful than losing a child.

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A child from Azaz silhouetted by bull...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble.

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Stuggle for healing
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
17 Jul 2012

Zain Adeen 14, struggles to gain strength for rehabilitation after a vehicle exploded in Feburary, 2012 while he was walking to work at a neighborhood restaurant in Baghdad, Iraq  where he sells hummus, the explosion resulted in losing his right foot and maiming his left leg. When asked how he feels about his situation Adeen said," This is normal in Baghdad what can I do?" Amman, Jordan 2012.

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Spider Hunters in Cambodia
Trov Pheang Ctas
By George Nickels
09 Jun 2012

On The 9th August 2012 I was invited to the remote jungle village, known as Trov Pheang Ctas, located deep within the Svay Ler district in Cambodia. It was somewhere I had never been or heard of, and I assumed there might be both unexploded landmines, and illegal logging activities, as is the case in much of the rural countryside.
My time there would be spent documenting the hunt of one of Cambodia’s finest delicacies, Haplopelma albostriatum.
Haplopelma albostriatum, are a species of tarantula called "a-ping" in Khmer, and also known as the Thai zebra tarantula, when fully grown can reach the size of a human palm.
The spiders are caught using a very primitive simple yet effective technique, where the hunter will tease the creature from its den by the ways of using a stick to tickle its web and entice the spider to surface. The spider then makes its retreat deep into its hole, but no escaping as that’s when the improvised shovels come into play. Although venomous the tarantulas are not deadly and there bite has been described as something close to a very bad bee sting.
Once visable the arachnid is quickly plucked from its hole and grabbed by its back just in front of its abdomen using 2 fingers with care taken to avoid a nasty bite from there rather large fangs.
When caught the spiders are delicately put into small plastic bottles and kept there until they and ready to eat. The process used to prepare the catch for eating comprised of filling a bowl with water and jointly drowning and washing the spider in one easy step. The method used at this particular village was very cheap and easy, the spiders are tossed in salt and deep fried.
It is not clear how this practice started, but some have suggested that the population might have started eating spiders out of desperation during the years of Khmer Rouge rule, when food was in short supply.

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Bashar Falls
Amman, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
29 May 2012

7-year old Jana holds up a piece of paper with a message for her homeland's regime: "Bashar falls."

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Fear of retribution
Al Mafraq, Jordan
By MattKauffman
24 May 2012

Waleed, 39, hides behind his son Talal in order to conceal his identity to protect relatives back in native Syria. Waleed and his family of six escaped Homs and were smuggled into Jordan with the aid of the Syrian Free Army

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Uganda_HIV
Gayaza
By Tadej Znidarcic
20 May 2012

Jacquelyne Mugenyi, HIV positive mother, plays with her son Mutumba Alpha in the backyard of their home in Gayaza, Uganda.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
30 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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A Child Sleeps With Weapons
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria

A child sleeps under weapons hung inside an FSA headquarters in the city of Taftanaz.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
14 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.