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Life after Ebola in Liberia: A Diffic...
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to everyday life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems. Survivors living on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia share their experiences of illness, loss, and coping with a new reality as the disease is slowly but surely eradicated from their area.

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

After one week of throwing up, Bindu, 23, went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

Helena Henry (30) and her brother were the first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Ebola Survivors 01
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

"People were talking a lot about the disease. You shouldn't shake any hands to prevent getting the disease," Mammie Bindah, 38, said.

Still her husband who was working at a treatment clinic got the disease. Mammie took care for him for about two weeks before he died. In the process, Mammie contracted Ebola. She was throwing up blood when she got to the ETU. This is where she fought the disease for 20 days.

"After 12 days I started feeling a bit better,” she said. “When I recovered, I found out that my children ran away out of fear. It took a while before they returned back home."

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Maternal issues through Ebola 05
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Health workers were afraid to accept Comfort at the local hospital when she needed to give birth. They thought she might be caught with Ebola, so they turned her away. Comfort is aiming at the spot right on the streets where she gave birth. To twins. In the rain.

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Ebola Survivors 08
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Rosanna's organization helps Ebola survivors to cope with the loss around Ebola.

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Ebola Survivors 09
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 10
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Beds of Ebola victims lie disused in a field near a closed Ebola treatment unit.

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Ebola Survivors 11
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU) lies all but condemned on the outskirts of Monrovia.

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Ebola Survivors 12
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

All of this woman's family members died; only grand children remain. Now, her house is empty.

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Ebola Survivors 13
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

An Ebola survivor does the dishes outside her home in Monrovia. Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 14
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
27 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 02
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

After one week of throwing up, Bindu (23) went to a hospital in her district. She couldn't eat anything for a over 10 days. All her family members around her also caught the virus. She is the only one survivor and in her community people are afraid to speak to her in fear of getting the disease.

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Ebola Survivors 04
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Helena Henry (30) and her brother the were first of her household to get Ebola from a younger cousin who was staying over. He died at the age of four-years-old, and soon after, more people in her family became ill.

"After calling for an ambulance for over 12 days, they finally showed up,” she said. “But in the meantime, my younger brother already died here in house."

She went to the ETU for treatment, but some people were afraid to go there, so they remained at home. After three weeks fighting for her life, she survived Ebola. Returning home, she found out that her husband, her sister and another brother, her aunt & uncle and their daughter and sister-in-law also caught the virus.

"None of them survived,” she said. “Now I live in a empty house, taking care of my two children, four children of my mother and one of my brother." She relies on food aid from World Food Program to get by. "When this aid stops, I don't know how I can feed 7 children."

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Ebola Survivors 06
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 07
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
26 Feb 2015

Surviving Ebola is one thing, but returning to life after the deadly virus brings its own new set of problems.

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Ebola Survivors 03
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
25 Feb 2015

The father of Vivian Kekula (26) was working in a local clinic as a nurse. That's where he contracted Ebola. When he got sick in June, her family didn't think about Ebola at first. The ambulance brought him to an ETU, but in the process he spreaded the disease to Vivian's mother, sister and a cousin. And then to Vivian. People were suffering from internal bleedings. "This was hard to watch. I was crying because I was scared. But people that were treating me where encouraging me, that gave me strength". When she got out she heard that all family members somehow survived the disease. "That's when we celebrated". Now she has a six month contract working for Save the Children to talk to survivors and hear their stories to see what aftercare is needed.

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Ebola Survivors 03
Monrovia, Liberia
By Reinier van Oorsouw
24 Feb 2015

Health workers were afraid to accept Comfort at the local hospital when she needed to give birth. They thought she might be caught with Ebola, so they turned her away. Comfort faces at the spot where she gave birth, in the middle of the the street, to twins. In the rain.

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Ebola Diaries 2014
Monrovia
By Daniel Van Moll
30 Sep 2014

At the end of September 2014 photojournalist Daniel van Moll travelled to Liberia to cover the outbreak of Ebola and the situation on the ground. The video gives insight to the enormous work of international health organizations like Doctors Without Borders who are operating the biggest Ebola Treatment Unit but also shows the struggle state health workers are experiencing while fighting the virus. Daniel visited the Ebola treatment unit of Doctors Without Borders in Monrovia where hundreds of volunteers provide help for Ebola infected patients. But he also visited rural counties in Liberia where international help did not yet arrive. But Daniel also focused on the social impact of the recent outbreak and visited a church in Monrovia to film the community trying to seek relief in their belief.

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Ebola Diaries (rough cut)
Monrovia, Liberia
By Daniel Van Moll
30 Sep 2014

At the end of September 2014 photojournalist Daniel van Moll travelled to Liberia to cover the outbreak of Ebola and the situation on the ground. The video gives insight to the enormous work of international health organizations like Doctors Without Borders who are operating the biggest Ebola Treatment Unit but also shows the struggle state health workers are experiencing while fighting the virus. Daniel visited the Ebola treatment unit of Doctors Without Borders in Monrovia where hundreds of volunteers provide help for Ebola infected patients. But he also visited rural counties in Liberia where international help did not yet arrive. But Daniel also focused on the social impact of the recent outbreak and visited a church in Monrovia to film the community trying to seek relief in their belief.

SHOTLISTS - Duration: 00’33’46’23
TIMECODE DESCRIPTION
00:00:00:00 Wall in Monrovia painted with warnings about the Ebola disease
00:00:10:15 Entrance to the compound of the Ebola Treatment Unit of Doctors Without Borders, Monrovia
00:00:48:19 A POV walk through the camp of Doctors Without Borders, Monrovia featuring hundreds of rubber boots drying after disinfection.
00:01:12:14 One of many hand-disinfection units
00:01:15:06 Disinfection of rubber boots
00:01:23:22 Removal of Personal Protective Equipment
00:01:54:11 The fenced high-risk area of the Ebola Treatment Unit with infected patients inside.
00:02:03:03 Nurses and medical personnel sitting next to the high-risk area.
00:02:12:22 A POV walk through the camp of Doctors Without Borders, Monrovia
00:02:31:20 Water deposit for medical personnel
00:02:40:09 Equipping Personal Protetive Equipment prior to entering the high-risk area of the Ebola Treatment Unit. The process takes about 10 minutes. You see names being written on the masks of the personnel at 00:08:43:11 to be able to identify individuals once they are dressed up.
00:10:51:12 Feaver measurement and hand disinfection at a county checkpoint outside of Monrovia
00:11:23:13 An abandoned clinic in Grand Cape Mount county. Personnel left after one case of Ebola had to be quarantined here (see below).
00:12:01:24 A young man being quarantined as he is suspected to have contracted the virus. This is his second of 21 days of isolation inside the abandoned clinic.
00:12:29:23 Emergency meeting of local health workers in Grand Cape Mount County.
00:13:06:05 Storage for protective equipment for local health workers in Grand Cape Mount County.
00:13:52:04 Driving to Dolo Town, a remote village in Margibi County.
00:13:59:15 Dolo Town in Margibi County. This town has been under lockdown for 21 days and lost about 250 people to Ebola.
00:14:31:06 Ebola Treatment Unit of the Island Clinic in Monrovia, next to Westpoint.
00:14:43:22 A WHO truck with health equipment leaving the Island Clinic in Monrovia.
00:15:12:14 Survivors of the Ebola infection are being released from Island Clinic Ebola Treatment Unit in Monrovia. They are declared cured and released after a last disinfection and hand-over of new uncontaminated clothing.
00:18:06:06 Sunday church service in St. Peter’s Church in Monrovia. Hundreds of people came to commemorate the fatalities of the recent Ebola outbreak.
00:22:26:14 And following: In times of Ebola sacramental bread is given out with tweezers during religious services to prevent the spread of the virus.
00:23:11:17 Hand disinfection liquids on a chair inside the church
00:23:18:12 One of the priests is disinfecting his hands during the service.
00:25:28:09 Soundbite about the need of international help / Dr. Julius Garbo, Grand Cape Mount County Health Officer
00:27:11:17 Soundbite about the need of international help and the process of retrieving a dead body that was suspected to be infected with Ebola / Henric Marcus Speare, Superintendent Mboo County
00:30:01:06 Soundbite about the personal tragedy from a local in Dolo Town, Margibi County / Francis, local journalist

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Ebola Diaries (Photos)
Monrovia
By Daniel Van Moll
29 Sep 2014

SCREENSHOTS FROM "EBOLA DIARIES," FILMED BY DANIEL VAN MOLL.

At the end of September 2014 photojournalist Daniel van Moll travelled to Liberia to cover the outbreak of Ebola and the situation on the ground. The video gives insight to the enormous work of international health organizations like Doctors Without Borders who are operating the biggest Ebola Treatment Unit but also shows the struggle state health workers are experiencing while fighting the virus. Daniel visited the Ebola treatment unit of Doctors Without Borders in Monrovia where hundreds of volunteers provide help for Ebola infected patients. But he also visited rural counties in Liberia where international help did not yet arrive. But Daniel also focused on the social impact of the recent outbreak and visited a church in Monrovia to film the community trying to seek relief in their belief.

Ebola: Life under quarantine
Monrovia, Liberia
By kierankesner
22 Sep 2014

The plane came to a rough landing as it skidded to a stop on the decaying runway. Upon exiting passengers were met with an army of people rushing to take our temperature with thermometers shaped like guns aimed at our heads. I would soon come to realize these thermometers as a frightening reminder that if the number read 101.5 Fahrenheit or higher, it might as well be a real gun they were placing to my head. Washing my hands with chlorine, I proceeded through the cacophony of customs where my passport was quickly stamped and I was sent on my way. Over the next week I would come face to face with Ebola; photographing the sick, dead and every stage of the virus in between. Realizing the severity of this epidemic that sets a country back after steadily making gains from the destruction caused by civil war from 1989-2003.

In the West Point neighborhood of Monrovia and nearby towns and villages, everyday life has nearly come to a halt as aid workers try to get ahead of the disease, setting up testing and washing stations, and as authorities try to enforce quarantines set up to prevent the disease from spreading to other parts of Monrovia.

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Liberia, NEC Destroys 2011 Elections
Monrovia, Liberia
By Anthony Daniels
21 Aug 2012

The National Elections Commission (NEC) will today August 21, 2012, commence the destruction of Ballot papers for the 2011 National Referendum and the 2011 presidential and Legislative Elections at all NEC's magisterial offices across Liberia.

The destruction of the ballot papers and other election related material is in keeping with Chapter 4 Section 4.16 of the 1986 New Election Law of Liberia.

The Acting Chairman of the NEC, Cllr. Elizabeth J. Nelson, will head a team of members of the Board of Commissioners and a team of NEC Staff to NEC Magisterial Office in Brewerville where an occasion marking the symbolic destruction of the electronics materials will be held.

Similarly, destruction of elections materials will be held simultaneously across the country at all NEC magisterial offices.

Meanwhile, the Commission is inviting all registered political parties, government officials, civil society organizations, international and local partners, the media and the public to attend the occasion which begin at 10:a.m., August 21, 2012.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast and Sierra Leone; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a baby boy under malaria treatment.

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Liberia after the war
Monrovia Liberia
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Jan 2011

” Monrovia-Liberia-West Africa, January 27, 2011 After two wars over two decades in Liberia, the country is still trying to find a new pathway towards the wellbeing of its people. A small 141 bed hospital, known in West Africa for its pediatric surgery department and as “THE HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS HOSPITAL”, has become the main reference platform for the people suffering in Liberia including foreign refugees from Ivory Coast; the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia, established in 1963 by the Hospitaller Order of the Brothers of St. John of God. In synchronicity, and for almost a decade ”POR AFRICA”, a small Spanish NGO fully dedicated to the children’s’ welfare, is working in collaboration trying to provide the finest in healthcare. The very small team of Spanish doctors is known by the affectionate moniker of “HEROES WITHOUT BORDERS”. In the picture, a personnel of the St'John's of God Hospital of Monrovia, is cleaning the pediatric ward.